Petfinder Annual Survey General Animal Care Grant

Humane Society of Schuyler County: Petfinder Annual Survey General Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The Petfinder Annual Survey General Animal Care grant was used to ready 15 cats for adoption.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant provided significant financial support to give appropriate veterinary care to 15 cats from a hoarding situation. Our intake over the summer months was particularly high. In the early fall, we were faced with taking animals from two hoarding cases back-to-back. This put both great financial strain on us and strain on the staff’s time to care for such large numbers at the same time. This funding helped to expedite the process of readying many of these animals for adoption, thus decreasing their time in the shelter, reducing the staff time needed and making room to accept more animals.

How many pets did this grant help?

15 cats

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

During the early fall, we took in two hoarding cases, one of 15 cats and one of 22 dogs and 14 cats. In both cases, the animals were in need of general veterinary care, spay/neuter, testing, vaccinations, fecal analysis, etc. A significant percentage of animals in both cases were also in need of extraordinary medical care, including mass removals and major dental work. The grant funding, used in its entirety, helped to provide basic veterinary care and spay/neuter services for 15 of these cats, many whom have since been adopted.

Humane Society of Nelson County: Petfinder Annual Survey General Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Medications and supplies, specifically bandage material and antibiotics for a dog with a fracture.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It allowed us to do regular bandage changes on the injured leg. Bandage material is costly.

How many pets did this grant help?

One immediately, but there are leftover supplies for others when needed.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

This dog, Rooster, is a 9-month-old great Pyrenees who was relinquished because the owner could not afford medical care. X-rays revealed a midshaft fracture of the radius and ulna of the left front leg. The leg was maintained in a splint, but the bandages had to be changed often for cleanliness and growth of the dog. He has not been adopted yet as the leg has not quite healed.

International Hearing Dog, Inc.: Petfinder Annual Survey General Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Funds from Petfinder Foundation were utilized to support the costs of running our Hearing Dog training program and general care for the dogs in our training facility. With many people on the waiting list for a hearing dog, every dollar is important to increase the number of placements and provide care to the dogs while they are in training. Our facility currently has 25 “residents in training” on a full-time basis and support from the Petfinder Foundation helped provide the needed food, vet/medical care, grooming, treats, and supplies for these dogs.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

With a full list of applicants from across the country waiting for their own new helpers, adequate finances for training and placements are always at the forefront of our fund-raising efforts. With your support, in Fiscal Year 2018-2019, International Hearing Dog, Inc. placed 22 certified Hearing Dogs with recipients across the country who are Deaf or hard-of-hearing. To date in 2019, we’ve placed 16 additional Hearing Dogs into loving homes. After lots of hard work and training, these special pups go on to become the “ears’ for their Deaf or hearing-impaired partners helping them live independently in a safe and secure home environment. Your $500 gift helped enable International Hearing Dog to continue to provide its professionally trained dogs at no cost to recipients.

How many pets did this grant help?

25 (On average, IHDI houses 25 dogs at its facility at any given time)

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Our Director of Placements recently placed one of our certified Hearing Dogs with a recipient in Illinois. The recipient, Jodi, was born Deaf and previously had a certified Hearing Dog through IHDI that recently passed away. Jodi was matched with Hearing Dog Crouton. In training, Crouton learned basic sound awareness (phone, doorbell and knock, smoke alarm, alarm clock, and baby cry), as well as general obedience and socialization skills. Crouton did great with both his sound training and socialization training and he’s already proven to be a great fit for Jodi’s needs. Having a dog that will alert her to the phone, doorbell/knock, smoke alarm, alarm clock, baby cry, and other common sounds in the home opens the doors of independence, awareness, and safety for Jodi. Additionally, as only dogs from animal shelters or rescue groups are selected for this special program, Crouton now has a second chance at a loving home where he is wanted, needed, and loved.

Friends of the Jefferson Animal Shelter: Petfinder Annual Survey General Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

We have used this grant to provide enrichment for the cats in our adoption center: Cat hammocks, cat beds, toys and cat scratchers for their cages.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It provided enrichment to the cats in our offsite adoption center waiting for forever homes.

How many pets did this grant help?

25

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

The cats love their hammocks and beds, which provide comfort while they are waiting for their forever homes. The cat scratchers for their cages provide them a place to do what comes naturally! And toys are always fun. Having happy, relaxed cats helps them find forever homes! Cats pictured include Willow (first photo). From her Petfinder profile: “This teenage kitten is super sweet and fun-loving. She’s been fostered with cats and dogs.” Meet Willow here.

Lucas County Canine Care & Control: Petfinder Annual Survey General Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The $1,000 of grant money was used towards the purchase of sound baffles for our large adoption area.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The sound baffles that were purchased with help of our Petfinder Foundation grant (recently purchased, so not yet delivered or installed) will help to drastically reduce the noise in our large-dog adoption area. This area houses 27 adoptable canines at any one time, and it can be a noisy room when all of the dogs get excited and start barking. Enrichment such as playgroups and Kongs help keep the dogs calm and happy, but when they get started barking, the room can be very loud to the dogs, volunteers and staff, and to possible adopters. This noise has even deterred potential adopters from viewing dogs in this area. We are really hoping that these sound baffles can help reduce the noise, thus helping the dogs and hopefully resulting in more adoptions.

How many pets did this grant help?

There are 27 kennels in our large adoption area, with new dogs coming and going every day.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Sweet Daria (first and second photos) has been waiting for a home since June 2018 and she resides in our large-dog adoption area. Although dogs have playgroups, volunteer time and enrichment throughout the day, this area still becomes very noisy, and sensitive dogs such as Daria and subject to the loud noises of the kennel for the majority of the day. These sound baffles will help to provide her with a more quiet and comfortable environment until the day she gets adopted. Meet Daria: http://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/41678495

Keebler (third photo) is another pup who, although she can really pull off the noise-cancelling headphone look, will absolutely love the new sound baffles thanks to the Petfinder Foundation.

Animal Defense League of Washington County, Inc.: Petfinder Annual Survey General Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Prior to any adoptions, our cats are fully vetted, which includes flea treatment, de-wormer, vaccinations, testing and, of course, spay/neuter surgery.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The funds received enabled us to promote our cats by saying they were the whole “cat and caboddle,” as we like to say. Offering a fully vetted/altered pet is a perk and reassures us that the animal will not reproduce, leading to unnecessary euthanasia in our shelters.

How many pets did this grant help?

About five

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

This is Topaz. He was found walking around a local store’s parking lot and rescued by one of our volunteers. We began our intake process of assessing and vetting and, once he was ready for adoption, uploaded his pics and bio to Petfinder. He’s a little lovebug — shy and needs time to warm up, but hopefully his fur-ever home is out there. Over the years, Petfinder has been such a valuable tool since it’s well-known and countrywide. We are able to showcase our adoptable cats on a much larger scale. We feel it’s efficient and easy for people to use. It’s such a wonderful tool. Thank you for this generous donation and keep up the great work! We’d love to continue our partnership with you. Meet Topaz: http://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/39546827/

Richland Hills Animal Services Center: Petfinder Annual Survey General Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

We were able to provide medical attention, spay/neuter and vaccinations to ten 3-week-old puppies who had been dumped in our city. All of those puppies are now adopted and living in loving homes.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We are constantly over-budget, due to being a very small shelter. This grant allowed us to care for animals that we would have had to raise funds to save.

How many pets did this grant help?

10

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Ellie was one of the 10 pups who was saved after being dumped in our city at the age of 3 weeks. She was the last to be adopted, but she’s so happy in her new home, along with her new big brother, Brodie. These pups appear to be shepherd/mastiff mixes, so getting them into homes was a challenge, but one we happily accepted!

Furry Friends Animal Rescue: Petfinder Annual Survey General Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The money was used to pay medical bills for three dogs who had demodectic mange. They each had several visits to the vet requiring prescription meds to help clear up their mange.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Furry Friends Animal Rescue was able to commit to rescuing these dogs even though we knew their treatment would be expensive.

How many pets did this grant help?

Three dogs were helped by this grant – Athena, Amie and Howie

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Athena, a German shepherd, was adopted by a wonderful family (third photo) after her foster parents spent weeks treating her for mange. The treatment was both expensive and time-consuming. Her new forever family sent us this update: “We are still doing great. Athena now weighs 65 lbs., and runs or walks every day! This is her after our three-mile walk this morning — tough life! Thanks for helping us find the missing piece of the puzzle to our family. We are so blessed to have Athena in our lives. We go on walks together, eat at the dinner table together — because Athena can’t reach the kid’s plates :o) — and she is teaching the kids to keep their things picked up, too! She has really whipped our family back into shape.”

Athena’s former foster mom says, “It’s incredible that the hairless, mangy, 39-lb., scared-of-people dog we got in March is now a fluffy 65-lb. dog who’s flourishing in her new family with a 4-year-old and an 8-year-old. We’ve had many fosters, but she holds a special place in our hearts. We are so glad she finally got the home she deserves and is being spoiled rotten.”

Thank you, Petfinder Foundation, for the grant which helped us rescue Athena, Howie and Amy.

Southern Counties Rescue: Petfinder Annual Survey General Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Every penny we get in seems to go to vet bills! This time of year we are busy testing and spay/neutering lots and lots of kittens. We also spend the money on vaccines, deworming and microchipping.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We are constantly short of funds to cover our vet bills since we never put a cat or kitten down if it has something that is treatable. In the last 12 months, we have had two eyelid surgeries costing $1,300 each and and a badly infected eye which ended up having to be removed, costing an extra $700. Your grants help us to continue rescuing cats and kittens in need. Last year we did over 200 cats and kittens and this year we may make it to 250!

How many pets did this grant help?

I have included four photos below of cats/kittens your grant helped. The last one shows paperwork from a very high-[volume] shelter. We were able to save the sweet mama cat and her four kittens because we had the funds to vet them.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

BK, a.k.a. Boy Kitty (first photo) was one of three cats who were abandoned when their owner got ill and went into assisted living. He is a total love at around 3 years old, and we just couldn’t see him left on the street to fend for himself. One of our volunteers took him in and is fostering him until he finds his forever home. We have vetted him, had him tested for FeLV/FIV, vaccinated and microchipped him to keep him safe forever. Meet BK: http://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/38495972

Another recent rescue is a mama cat and her four kittens from a very high-[volume] shelter. They are all adorable, but came down with a cold, and we rescued them before they were scheduled to be euthanized that afternoon. The mama cat’s shelter pic is the second photo.

We also rescued four bottle babies (third photo) from another shelter which was unable to care for them. Now named Sterling, Sawyer, Sebastian and Sissy, these guys are adorable and now ready for adoption. Sterling and Sawyer (fourth photo) turned out to be twins. Meet them: http://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/38254670

The Cats' Cradle: Petfinder Annual Survey General Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The money was used for x-rays ($250), a FIP test ($120)and a taxoplasmosis test ($300) as well as ongoing medication for taxoplasmosis including two different types of antibiotics, eye drops and eye cream and steroids. As well as weekly follow up appointment.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant was extremely helpful in being able to provide this cat with the necessary medical care it needed. This is one of our rescues in one of our foster homes. Due to this grant we were able to get the necessary treatment without draining funds from our spay/neuter, vaccination, and other medical care that we provide to each of our rescues. We are low in funds as we are small and rely soley on public donations. We recently paid the vet bills for 17 cats that were shot as target practice in our area and it left us with almost nothing. The grant that was provided was the only way this kitty would have received any treatment at all.

How many pets did this grant help?

Specifically Nelson but in turn it helped us be able to continue to get the necessary care for our rescues currently in foster care and ones to come

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Nelson was born in late April 2016. It was soon after his birth that his foster parents saw an indention in his chest cavity. X-rays were performed and it was determined to be a congenital midline shift. His sternum is pushed in towards his heart but at this time it looks as if he will not have any ill effects from it. He is a lucky little kitten.rnThen at 5 months old Nelson’s eyes began looking cloudy. He was taken to the Veterinarian who was concerned that it may be a result of FIP. He was tested for it and he does not have it. The second possibility was that he possibly had toxoplasmosis. He was tested and was found to be negative for that. He has undergone rounds of steroids, antibiotics, eye drops and creams for the past month and a half with little improvement. One of his eyes darts back and forth occasionally. The next step for Nelson is to be taken to an Optometrist in order to determine if he can keep his eye sight or if he may go blind. However we can not afford to do so as we have already spent close to 1,000 dollars on his treatment.rnNelson is a mixed Siamese. He has the greatest personality and spirit. He takes his medicine with little or no fuss. He is so good natured and laid back. rn