Orvis Animal Care Grant

Humane Society of Marion County: Orvis Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

15 sherpa fleece Kuranda dog bed pads

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Kuranda dog bed pads are wonderful and they fit on the Kuranda beds that we have for each dog. We had two pads that were donated to us for our senior dogs that we love and were very thankful for, but we wanted enough for each dog to have one, especially during the colder months. With the Orvis Animal Care Grant, we purchased a pad for each kennel so the dogs can be snuggly and comfortable on their beds. These pads are also great because they can be washed and reused for many dogs.

How many pets did this grant help?

15 and countless more, as they can be washed and reused for many dogs

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Tomato (first photo) is a sweet hound mix. She is enjoying her new Kuranda dog pad. Immediately after we put it on the bed, she climbed on with her favorite squeaky toy and snuggled in for the night! You can meet Tomato here.

Bowser, a Pyrenees/retriever mix, was just neutered in the picture below and he was recovering from the surgery. We got the pad just in time. You can see in the picture the shaved spot from his IV. The fleece Kuranda dog bed pad helped him to be comfortable and relax after surgery.

These beds are washable; therefore, they can be used for so many, many dogs during their stay with us prior to adoption. The fleece pads help to keep them comfortable. Not only are the dogs warm and snuggly lying on them, the pads are very soft too.

Humane Society of McCormick County: Orvis Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

We purchased an item called the Club House Climber. It came from the Step Two Company that produces indoor/outdoor play items and jungle gyms.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It provided a climbing surface and play area for our shelter dogs. Originally, the fenced-in area was empty of structures, with just trees. This addition initiated actual play instead of just running. The dogs explored different surfaces and levels and played “hide and seek” activities.

How many pets did this grant help?

This grant item has benefited all of our shelter dogs. We are small, with only 12 pens, but we house about 25 dogs, including puppy litters.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We are the only refuge for unwanted animals in the county, and our county has a plethora of unsupervised and roaming dogs producing litters even though we vigorously promote spay and neuter. We have a northern partner that helps us out with puppy litters. We struggle with ways to enrich their experiences so we can send them healthy and happy puppies ready for their forever homes. The puppies are being transported later this month. The Club House Climber helps with their socialization with each other, other dogs, and humans. We believe the play was more fun as we observed more tail wags and relaxed body language.

Chico (first photo) is especially fond of the climber! From his Petfinder profile: “This happy boy is Chico. He loves people and enjoys going for walks. He leans into you when you pet him and he likes to splash around in the baby pool. Chico is an active dog and he is bonded to his favorite playmate, his brother Rico. They play and wrestle together. He doesn’t ever want to go inside, although this could change with some patience. He needs room to run and a privacy fence due to his ability to climb a chain link fence. Chico is butterscotch-colored with white and black markings and one brown eye and one eye that appears white. Chico is neutered, up to date on his shots, microchipped and healthy. He is a beautiful mix of breeds but mostly boxer with a date of birth of 3/26/18 and full grown at 68 lbs. Chico would love to find a home with his brother Rico.” Meet Chico here.

Rancho Coastal Humane Society: Orvis Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

We purchased products that help stimulate and enrich our shelter dogs during their stay. Items purchased included:
Dog Lick Mat Treat-Dispensing Mat
Peanut Lick Mat Slow-Feeders Distraction Device with Suction Cup
Hyper Pet LickiMat Playdate Blue Slow-Feeder Mat for Dogs
Aquapaw Treat-Dispensing Mat for Dogs
Wilton Recipe Right Non-Stick 6-Cup Jumbo Muffin Pan
KONG Tiltz, Small
KONG Treat Dispenser Hopz Ball Dog Toy, Large
KONG Spin It Treat Dog Toys
KONG Gyro Dog Toy, Small
KONG Treat Dispenser Flipz Dog Toy, Large
Zuke’s Mini Naturals Peanut Butter & Oats Recipe Dog Treats
Zuke’s Mini Naturals Savory Salmon Recipe Dog Treats
Zuke’s Mini Naturals Roasted Chicken Recipe Dog Treats

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Animal Care and Adoption Director Ashley Llapitan says, “These enrichment items improve and enhance our animals’ mental states, providing mental stimulation to tire them out and keep them occupied. It encourages them to learn to problem-solve and also it helps them build their confidence.”

How many pets did this grant help?

On Sept. 15, 2020, we had 68 dogs in our care. All have the potential to benefit from these new products.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

For this report, I would like to highlight 92-lb. mastiff mix Pancake. He has been at the shelter since March. During that time, he was adopted and returned once, as the adopters felt Pancake was more dog than they could handle once they got him home. Pancake can and will easily jump a 6-foot fence. He is friendly and playful, but needs to be mentally and physically stimulated.

In the fifth photo, you can see our staff member Tracy walking Pancake back from the play yards to his kennel. She has a firm grip, but Pancake is clearly distracted and pulling due to the barking and reactions from his kennelmates. However, as soon as Pancake walks into his kennel and notices the special Dog Lick Mat loaded with peanut butter, he quickly calms and focuses his attention on the special treat. You can meet Pancake here.

Thank you, Petfinder Foundation, for supporting Rancho Coastal Humane Society.

Animal Rescue of the Rockies: Orvis Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

We bought beds, blankets and toys for dogs who are in foster care, awaiting their forever homes. If these dogs can be more comfortable and more happy while in foster care, we hope they can get adopted faster.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant enabled us to provide enrichment to these dogs without taking money away from medical care such as spay/neuter and vaccinations. The enrichment toys kept the dogs stimulated. The beds and blankets are comfy and soft. The dogs enjoy their stay in foster care!

How many pets did this grant help?

250

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

One of our older dogs, Bert, was provided a heated memory-foam bed so that his old bones could be comfy and warm. He really enjoyed this bed prior to his adoption. It’s possible that his smiling face enabled him to get adopted by a wonderful new family.

Tulsa SPCA: Orvis Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

We used the Petfinder Foundation Orvis Animal Care grant to purchase the following: five wobbler dog toys, five food-cube dog toys, four rawhide dog treats, 13 snuffle feeding mats, five treat-dispensing toys, and 20 slow-feeder bowls,

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We have used these enrichment items to keep the animals in our care mentally and physically active during their stay with us. Many of the dogs in our care were developing behavioral issues and, due to budget constraints, we did not have a variety of enrichment items. Thanks to the Petfinder Foundation Orvis Animal Care grant, we were able to greatly diversify our selection of enrichment items to prevent boredom and depression while the dogs waited for their forever homes.

How many pets did this grant help?

37 and counting!

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Cesare (first photo) was a dog in our care who had a difficult time being adopted because he was a senior dog but had never been house trained. He was surrendered to us by a good Samaritan who’d found him wandering the streets but couldn’t keep him. Because Cesare was a larger dog, while he waited for his forever family, his adjustment to the shelter environment was not going well. He would howl and knock over his bed every time someone walked by him. Once we introduced him to our enrichment programs that included enrichment items from the Petfinder Foundation Orvis Animal Care grant (second photo), he turned a corner and we’re happy to report, has been adopted!

Animal Rescue of the Rockies: Orvis Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Purchase of educational toys to keep both the cats and dogs stimulated. Catnip mice. Dog and cat beds

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

These items keep the cats and dogs happy while they’re waiting for their forever home. The animals are stimulated and using their senses.

How many pets did this grant help?

100

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Lollie really enjoys catnip. We provided her several different catnip toys to keep her stimulated and happy while waiting for adoption. These toys gave her exercise, too! Lollie was adopted within a few weeks. Seeing her playing with her catnip toys may have made the difference!

Sequoia Humane Society: Orvis Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The monies that were granted for this project were spent on dog enrichment for our shelter dogs. We were able to establish a fight kit, should we need it, for group play in our outdoor field and enclosures. Windchimes have been purchased and installed in all of our outdoor kennels, and they seem to calm our dogs during the day while they enjoy fresh air, sunshine and exercise. And lastly, scent enrichment was purchased. We were able to buy and have been using oils and spices for our scent enrichment. Oils that were purchased are: vanilla, almond, coconut, banana, peppermint and eucalyptus extracts; spices are nutmeg, rosemary, parsley, cumin, cinnamon, and parsley; and lastly spray scents of ocean, lavender, cookie and Hawaiian mist.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant afforded us new opportunities to provide simple activities of enrichment for our shelter dogs. The scent enrichment allows the dogs to use their sense of smell and enhance their senses of smell through different scents throughout the week. The practice has been well-received by the dogs, both in the kennels as well as outdoor areas.

The fight kit was something that we have been needing to in order to engage in group play in our outdoor areas. Staff and volunteers have been trained on the proper use of break sticks, air horns, and blankets should the dogs involved in group play decide to not get along or the play gets too serious. Group play had not been used in our shelter previous to getting this gear so that all parties are safe with their interactions.

The windchimes tap into the dog’s sense of hearing and is soothing to them outdoors in our enclosures. The sounds that resonate from them drown a little of the noise from the cars that pass which is wonderful for some of our more shy dogs learning to feel safe outdoors. It has been a very pleasant addition to our normal.

How many pets did this grant help?

350

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

This grant has helped several of our current dogs in-house. We have been able to engage in group play with several dogs, including Diesel (first and second photos), a large, full-grown doberman who took a liking to Vera (third photo), a cairn terrier mix; and Uno (fourth photo), a big Siberian husky-Pyrenees mix puppy. Having two of them out in the field playing together was fine, but adding the third to the mix created a little too much excitement and air horns stopped all activity so that the humans could return dogs to leashes and calm the situation.

Diesel was recently adopted.
Meet Vera here.
Meet Uno here.

Whitman County Humane Society: Orvis Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The grant money that we received was used for purchasing new enrichment items for the dogs that are living at or will come to Whitman County Humane Society. These items are being used to make the dogs’ stays more enjoyable and make them more adoptable!

Some of the items that were purchased included Petstages Dogwood Stick chew toys and a Rubbermaid tote to contain multiple toys that now lives in our play yard so the staff and volunteers have quick and easy access to toys to provide for the dogs during that enrichment activity. Quite a few food enrichment items were purchased that included Lickimats, a Trixie Mad Scientist food windmill, a Foobler ball, chain belt sets to make frozen treats to hang from the fences, and SmartBones calming chews to help keep the dogs busy while helping to keep them calm in an environment as stressful as a shelter.

One item from our original proposal that was not purchased was popsicle molds. This decision was made due to the item that we were wanting to purchase no longer being available and other options were more expensive than we were willing to spend.

Play sand and a flirt pole were also purchased, which allow the dogs to experience new physical activities, from digging in sand to jumping and chasing the fleece lure on the flirt pole. To stimulate sensory enrichment, a portable speaker that plays calming music was purchased, as well as windchimes. The dogs have enjoyed listening to sounds that were not other dogs barking.

The initial proposal put the items that we wanted to purchase at $959.23, and we requested the full $1,000 to account for changes in price and shipping for the items. When ordering the items, quite a few were under the price that was initially seen and reported. This allowed for funds that otherwise would not be used if solely going off our proposal to purchase other items that were not initially included. In the effort to not waste any grant money that we received, we purchased new gentle leaders, easy-walk harnesses, and chain leashes. These items are being used to train the dogs to walk on a loose leash — a characteristic that makes a dog more adoptable! Some dogs that come to us can be very destructive and mouthy towards a leash; a chain leash discourages the dog from grabbing the leash and pulling on it and/or chewing through it.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant has helped our dogs experience more positive interactions with the staff and volunteers. Before, we did not have many options in terms of enrichment. What the dogs had before were old and highly chewed-up toys, broken puzzle feeders, and KONGS. Now the dogs who come into our care have more ways to work their brains and bodies. The new food enrichment items allow for the dogs to get their meals in new and fun ways! New chew toys give the dogs something that they can chew and munch on. The grant has also helped allow the dogs to get more exercise with having more durable leashes and harnesses while also using the time as a training period so they know how to walk on a leash when they are adopted.

How many pets did this grant help?

Since the receipt of this grant we have helped 18 dogs, with more to come as more dogs come to our shelter.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

In early January, a dog named Pippin was surrendered to our shelter. We knew he was an anxious guy, but we never anticipated how difficult his shelter stay would be for him. We saw a young border collie with happy eyes on day one, and that quickly changed. He absolutely shut down in the shelter. Within his first week here, he bit one of our staff members. We discovered that Pippin was incredibly food-aggressive and in the shelter felt as though his resources were going to be taken from him.

Of course, once he had a bite history, finding him a home took a long time. We found ways to work around him and try to grow his confidence with us. Our resources were limited, and our toys and puzzles were too worn down to stimulate Pippin in the ways he needed.

With training and all the new toys and enrichment activities that we were able to purchase with the Orvis Animal Care Grant, Pippin started to show us those happy eyes again.

On August 4, Pippin found his happy ending. His new “mom” had been following him for months. She put in the work and did the research to help make Pippin’s transition to the home a successful one. We are so glad we were able to give Pippin what he needed with your generous gift and start him on the path of rehabilitation and help him become confident enough to overcome his initial fears so much so that he was finally adopted!

Our Lil' Bit of Heaven Animal Rescue & Sanctuary: Orvis Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The monies from the Orvis grant were used to purchase a sound system with multiple speakers for the main campus kennel, soothing CDs for the dogs, and problem-solving toys for the dogs.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Soothing music now flows through the 12 audio speakers that line the perimeter of the main kennel and helps the dogs calm down. The West Paw problem-solving toys help to keep the dogs occupied and entertained. The toys are dishwasher-safe, challenging for the dogs, and are very durable.

How many pets did this grant help?

211

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Larry (first photo) is a senior dog who has shown some signs of depression. Jerky treats were wedged into the bottom of the West Paw Zogoflex Toppl treat-dispensing toy and given to Larry (second photo). Right away, Larry perked up, manipulated the toy with his paws, opened it up and spent an hour rescuing the treats that were wedged in the bottom. That was a long period of time that Larry was engaged in play and he was gratified when he retrieved all of the jerky. Larry has not been adopted as of this time, but he is a candidate for our Forever Foster Care program and we have been looking for a foster home for him. You can meet Larry here.

Muncie Animal Care & Services: Orvis Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

We used Petfinder Foundation grant monies to purchase agility equipment and toys that can be enjoyed over and over, and are sturdy and washable, to enrich our dogs’ exercise time.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Outside time is so vitally important to our dogs mentally, emotionally and physically, and the equipment purchased is making their play moments even more positive. Since we have no shaded areas in the dog areas, we installed canopies in the corners of the play yards. On hot and sunny days, the dogs can enjoy the outside longer since they are not in constant direct sunlight and have shade available for them to relax under. The agility equipment also encourages potential adopters to interact and spend more time with our dogs. We want our dogs’ stays at MAC&S to be a loving and stimulating. The agility items will help keep them upbeat, active and more engaging to potential adopters.

How many pets did this grant help?

1,125 dogs

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Beretta is a very active German shepherd who has had an extended stay at the shelter. He came in as a neglect case and is waiting for a court date to determine if he can be returned to the owner or be placed on our adoption floor. Beretta is so smart. Until we had the agility equipment, he didn’t have much to play with on his own in our exercise yards. He was frustrated and full of energy in his kennel. Now he can discover the different activities available to him. He is happier and more mentally stimulated.