Orvis Animal Care Grant

Welfare for Animals Guild (WAG): Orvis Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Travel expenses for prison trips $117.12
Dog food and treats 705.34
Medicine and first aid (Cosequin) 120.07
Training supplies 57.47
TOTAL $1,000.00

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Our 2019 Orvis Animal Care grant supported WAG’s Clallam Bay Corrections Center (CBCC) Program for three months. In the CBCC Program, puppies and dogs received the training and socialization they need in order to be suitable for adoption. Dogs in the program were paired with the incarcerated trainers, who cared for them around the clock every day. Additionally, WAG volunteers traveled to the prison weekly to visit the dogs and discuss training issues with the handlers. Some of the dogs who participate in the program require serious rehabilitation. They stay as long as required to pass the American Kennel Club obedience test. Thus, during the grant period, we had animals who graduated and were adopted, some who completed training and are now back at the WAG Ranch and eligible for adoption, and some who are still working on their training at the prison. Our Orvis Animal Care Grant provided food, treats, medicine, and training supplies for the Clallam Bay Corrections Center dogs and puppies, and also covered some of the travel expenses for WAG volunteer visits to the prison.

How many pets did this grant help?

About 50 dogs and puppies in the CBCC program are or will be helped by this grant.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

This grant supported WAG’s Clallam Bay Corrections Center Program, where our rescued puppies and dogs are paired with incarcerated handlers who provide the socialization and training the pups need in order to be adoptable. We would like to highlight the stories of three dogs who participated in the prison program during the grant period.

Chief (first photo) is a handsome male staghound who recently celebrated his first birthday. He belonged to a single man who fell on hard times and gave his puppy to friends who owned a farm, hoping to secure a happy future for him. But because of Chief’s high prey drive, common to his breed, he did not do well living on a farm and surrounded by chickens and other small animals. Luckily, the farmers entrusted with his care brought Chief to WAG. By this time, Chief had high anxiety and not many house manners, as he had always lived outside. During his prison training, he was able to overcome most of his anxiety and learn how to live as an inside pet. In May, our magnificent Chief was adopted by an awesome family, including two young children who adore cuddling and playing with him (second and third photo). He now has a big fenced yard, someone at home with him every day to guide and work with him, and even regular outings to the beach!

Sylvee (fourth photo) is a beautiful black and silver husky/shepherd mix, currently only about 7 months old. She was originally from Texas, and was brought to Washington State by a young couple traveling and living in their van. Poor Sylvee was crated all the time and deprived of food. When she was first taken in by WAG, she did not know how to live in a house or even how to eat out of a bowl, though she was remarkably sweet and trusting. Sylvee spent some weeks at WAG, where she came to feel safe, gained weight and confidence, and grew completely healthy. Little Sylvee got lots of attention and care from the volunteers at WAG, who described her as “loving, so patient for a puppy, and a jewel” and “bright, fun, and beautiful; full of spirit.” Once she was ready, Sylvee entered the prison program, where she quickly became a well-adjusted young dog, receiving the basic training she still needed. At the end of July, Sylvee was adopted by a phenomenal couple with an active lifestyle. Not only has she gained a loving home, she now has a wonderful big brother, Koda, with whom she bonded immediately (fifth and sixth photos). Her new family has already sent WAG a video of Sylvee and Koda racing around their beautiful yard together — such a joyous scene!

Andy, a friendly whippet mix/border collie mix (seventh and eighth photos), is 2 years old. He lived for short stints in several homes before being voluntarily relinquished to WAG. Though his former groomer described him as “the ultimate good boy,” Andy did not do well in busy homes and was reactive when overstimulated. With a lot to learn, he is currently at the prison, where he is thriving under the care of a patient and experienced trainer. Young Andy has learned to focus his attention, use his boundless energy wisely, walk calmly on a leash, and obey basic commands — and now he is ready for his forever home! Sleek and athletic, young Andy loves to play ball, is built for agility and other canine sports, and would make a great hiking partner. He is already housetrained and would love a canine companion. This striking guy is going to be a fantastic companion for his lucky adopter! You can find out more about Andy here.

Paris Animal Welfare Society: Orvis Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

This grant was used to purchase interactive toys for our dogs.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This opportunity gave us more ways to stimulate our dogs and keep them happy and healthy while in our care! With many interactive toys, such as Jolly Balls and treat-dispensing toys, we have been able to continue improving our enrichment standards. Our pups were extremely happy to receive toys that encourage them to think and figure out how to work around the toy.

How many pets did this grant help?

700 (so far, about 200, but we anticipate this for a year)

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Gabby was brought to PAWS on June 4, 2019, weighing only 21.8 lbs. After she was examined by our veterinarian, it was concluded that Gabby should weigh between 45-50 lbs. Unfortunately, due to severe neglect, Gabby refused to eat for several days. Our staff had to administer several medications, fluids, and calorie supplements for many weeks.

We are happy to say that Gabby went to a transport partner just this week (July 22) weighing 40 lbs.! During her stay, Gabby LOVED the Jolly Balls and treat-dispensing toys! To see the look on her face, and on our staffers’ faces when we witnessed her play for the first time, was priceless. Thank you for such an amazing opportunity to give back to our pups!

The first picture is of her at intake; the second is the morning of her being loaded to find her forever home!

Capital Area Humane Society: Orvis Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

This money was used to purchase enrichment supplies for the dogs in our care. We purchased agility equipment, supplies to build an A-frame, scent-work supplies, speakers and music, and freedom harnesses.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

More mental stimulation and exercise has greatly improved many of our dogs’ behavior in their kennels, leading to many harder-to-place dogs getting adopted.

How many pets did this grant help?

2500

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Gunner was a very high-energy, large dog who was helped with this grant funding. His new freedom harness gave volunteers the confidence to take him on walks on the trails around our large pond. He can be jumpy and mouthy, he likes to play tug with his leash, and he pulls on walks. Combined with his large size, he was spending most of his time in his kennel, because his behavior is a lot for the average volunteer to manage. With his harness, not only was his pulling under control, but he couldn’t grab his leash, either. Gunner also adored running up and down our new A-frame and using the rest of the agility equipment. More frequent exercise significantly reduced his mouthiness, and we put an adorable picture of him enjoying a hike on social media (first photo). The post was popular, and he was adopted a few days later by a nice family who fell in love with him.

Humane Society of Blue Ridge: Orvis Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Money was used for was used for an agility course and fencing.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It helped us with obedience training and giving the dogs a more active lifestyle.

How many pets did this grant help?

Every pet that comes though the shelter

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Oscar is a pit mix we have. He had a lot of pent-up energy where running wasn’t really an option for him. With this agility course, he’s able to run, jump, and exercise, and he’s a lot calmer in the runs during the day. He’s normally barking and jumping like crazy, but now he naps and can’t wait to go back outside. Meet Oscar here.

Columbia Humane Society: Orvis Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

We bought 13 new Kuranda beds with the money given to us by the Orvis Animal Care Grant.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Most dogs now have a Kuranda bed in their inside AND their outside kennels. Kuranda dog beds provide a comfortable place for animals to sleep and spend time resting off the concrete when outside. Being off the floor, they are draft-free and warmer than if they were directly on the floor or even if provided blankets. The outside kennels’ floors are often wet (we are located in Oregon) so the beds provide a nice dry spot, as well. Kuranda beds are also excellent for soft-fabric chewers because leaving bedding material overnight can be dangerous to the dogs’ health.

How many pets did this grant help?

Many more than 13 dogs, because the beds are sanitized and reused many times.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

The Kuranda beds are giving comfort to many dogs. One dog who now has a Kuranda bed both inside and outside is Picassa (first and second photos). Picassa came to the Columbia Humane Society through a Puerto Rico shelter partnership. Picassa had a hard life before coming to the shelter. She has now been at CHS for several months and is allowing her loving and happy nature to show. Still somewhat reserved, she is now taking delight in demonstrating her curious and playful side. She now walks well on a leash and has become a favorite of volunteers. Unless eating or sniffing around her outside kennel (she is a great “scent-hound”), she always sits on her new Kuranda bed, except when she is approached — then she jumps up, wagging her tail vigorously in greeting. Hence, the photographs had to be taken surreptitiously through the wire! She is still available for adoption here.

Another dog, or rather puppy, who is making use of her lovely new Kuranda bed is Fern (third and fourth photos). Fern is a little dynamo from a Texas transport partner. She lives in a foster home much of the time, but comes to the shelter during days when her human is at work. She loves her Kuranda bed to jump on as well as rest on! Here she is, nuzzling a treat ball on her bed. She is still available for adoption here.

Sammy (fifth photo) was featured on Facebook and Instagram enjoying his Kuranda bed with blankets to keep him snuggly while at the shelter. Sammy has already found his forever home!

Humane Animal Treatment Society: Orvis Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Our Orvis grant that we received was used to purchase 12 brand new, durable Kuranda beds for our dog kennel, 13 replacement Kuranda bed legs, 20 martingale collars and 10 leashes for our dogs when they are taken out on volunteer walks.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant really helped our organization by replacing our most well-loved Kuranda beds that have gone through the most wear and tear. Many of the ones we currently had were chewed on the sides, had a missing leg or were just becoming difficult to clean as well as our staff would have liked. By receiving this grant, we were able to purchase brand new ones with a more-washable fabric, and the dogs have been loving them so far.

We had a lot of escape artists in our kennel at one time a few months ago. Since we send our dogs out on walks with volunteers, we need our equipment (leashes, collars, and harnesses) to be reliable and without fault. Unfortunately, flat collars can be easy for a dog to back out of and get loose from. Because of this we chose to put our escape-artist dogs on martingale collars to eliminate this issue for the safety of all.

How many pets did this grant help?

At least 30 already, and countless in the future as more dogs come into our care.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Broggy, a husky mix (first photo), was one of the many dogs who were most helped by this grant. Broggy came to us with porcupine quills in her face. After vet care, she went onto the adoption floor and was able to go on volunteer walks. From the beginning, Broggy was the master of slipping her collar. It was decided that she would go on walks in a harness, but then it took staff five minutes to put her in a harness. It was stressful for both staff and volunteers knowing that Broggy would try and slip her collar every time she went on a walk. When we purchased our first set of martingale collars, Broggy was one of the first dogs who received one. From that moment on, the staff didn’t have to worry about her slipping her collar or fussing with a complicated harness. Broggy was adopted on Oct. 30, 2018!

Reggie, a hound mix (second photo), is a staff favorite and an absolute sweetheart. He is currently at our shelter. He adores his Kuranda bed. Reggie has genetically poor back knees at 6 years old and is currently in laser therapy. He never leaves his bed, and getting a new Kuranda bed helped him stay off the solid concrete floor and support his knees. Reggie is still at our shelter and looking for his forever home. From his Petfinder profile: “I’m a laid-back guy who will let you know when I want attention and love. I can be independent and waddle around doing my own thing, but I still really would like for someone to love me unconditionally. I could possibly live in a home with other dogs if we met first and our personalities are compatible. I could live in a home with feline siblings or children.” You can meet Reggie here.

Upper Peninsula Animal Welfare Shelter: Orvis Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Dog enrichment toys to reduce boredom and give the dogs at the shelter mental and physical stimulation while they wait to be adopted.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Dogs enjoy having toys, and especially busy toys, to play with. The Boomer Balls work well for dogs who tend to destroy normal balls. The Tug-a-Jug toys have been really helpful — especially since we live in such a cold climate, and they give the dogs an indoor activity.

How many pets did this grant help?

400

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Bruno (pictured) is a dog who is with us now. He is VERY mistrusting of people. We had a great breakthrough with him with the help of the Tug-a-Jug slow-feeder busy toy. He started to know that good things happen with us! From his Petfinder profile: “Bruno is one handsome gentleman! His beautiful gold coat, big bright eyes and unique curly tail are absolutely stunning. But he’s not all looks; he also has the brains too! Bruno is very smart and quick to learn. He falls head-over-heels in love with the people he spends time with and is ready to learn and please them. Bruno falls so in love that sometimes he can be protective of the people he cares about, but with appropriate training is a wonderful companion dog. Bruno was good with other dogs in the past, but would likely prefer a home where he can be the only dog. He loves to go for walks but is just as great at being a couch potato. Bruno is a very big boy and would do best in a home that has big-dog experience.” Meet Bruno here.

UPDATE: Bruno was adopted in March!

Alberta (AB) Herding Dog Rescue: Orvis Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The grant for $472.72 was used to purchase RollOver chew treats such as cow hooves, tendon chews and tripe chews.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Many of the rescues are kenneled during the day until their playgroup is scheduled for outside yard time. To keep them busy and occupied while they wait, the chew treats give them something to do while they wait for their turn.

How many pets did this grant help?

30

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Not all of the pets who have benefited from the Orvis grant have been adopted yet. However, we have had at least three adoptions since receiving the grant and there are six dogs currently on their trial adoptions. The dogs still in rescue are still enjoying some of the more lasting chews (cow hooves) while they wait for their new families.

The Humane Society and Animal Rescue of Muskegon County: Orvis Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

We used the funding to purchase dog enrichment toys/puzzles in order to keep our dogs mentally and physically happy and healthy while they wait to be adopted.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The dogs in our care have a length of stay ranging from a few days to just over a year. Whether they are just arriving or are a long-stay animal, we make sure they keep their minds and bodies active. The shelter setting can be very stressful; that is why we are so thankful this grant has allowed us to buy puzzles and enrichment toys that will take our dogs’ focus off the stressful environment. Mental and physical enrichment is vital to a dog’s health while in our care, and it directly impacts their adoptability. This grant helped enrich the lives of our dogs and increased their adoptability.

How many pets did this grant help?

30+

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

This grant helped our sweet girl Smooch get adopted! She was with us for just over six months. She’s an absolutely wonderful dog; her only flaw was that she would get too excited when she came into the visiting rooms for meet-and-greets. She would come in so excited that she’d knock the potential adopters over, sometimes jumping up and head-butting them in the face. We would run her in the yard daily, take her for walks, and have her in dog playgroups, but she would just get so amped and stressed in her kennel that she always came out too hyped for the adopters’ liking. Once we received this grant, we started her on an enrichment schedule in her kennel that included different puzzles and toys multiple times a day, every day. We immediately noticed a difference in her behavior with the increased mental stimulation she was receiving along with the physical exercise she had been getting already. Smooch had a wonderful visit with a family shortly after and she MADE IT HOME JUST IN TIME FOR CHRISTMAS! Thank you for your support in making this possible.

The Humane Society of Southwest Missouri: Orvis Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

18 Kuranda beds for our shelter dogs

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Kuranda beds are the BEST! They are wonderful for old, arthritic dogs, ones who are injured and/or recovering from surgeries, and those who just love a comfy place to sleep. They’re easily cleaned and very durable, so they’re perfect for a shelter setting where the alternative is often just a concrete floor with a blanket. Prior to this grant, we only had a handful of Kuranda beds, yet thousands of dogs are in our care annually.

How many pets did this grant help?

We intake over 1,800 dogs a year and the majority are large dogs, so it could be over a thousand who benefit from and enjoy these beds during their stay with us.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Morey (first photo) came to us as a stray. He’s a senior shepherd who was thin and very arthritic. He’s gaining weight and, thanks to his new Kuranda, enjoying a more comfortable stay with us as he awaits a new family.

Lucy (second photo) came to us as a stray with a horribly injured leg. Despite our best efforts, we were unable to save it and she required amputation to be pain-free. Thanks to her new Kuranda bed, she is able to rest in comfort while she is recovering. Lucy (and her Kuranda) are in foster care right now, but she will be medically cleared for adoption and ready for her forever home soon.