Orvis Animal Care Grant

Proud Animal Lovers Shelter: Orvis Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The grant award of $650 was used to purchase four large, igloo-style dog houses.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

A number of our dog houses were in serious need of replacement in order to meet state regulations and to make a safe environment for our dogs. These four new dog houses have enabled us to meet both of these goals.

How many pets did this grant help?

Approximately 40 dogs

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

DeeDee (first photo) is an senior dog who likes being inside her dog house with her blanket whenever the weather turns a bit chilly. It is just to her liking. We are in the process of trying to return DeeDee to her original owner as soon as certain conditions are met, so we hope this happens very soon. In the meantime, we are happy that she has a solid, safe, dog house in which to spend her time outside. You can meet DeeDee here.

A.D.O.P.T. Pet Shelter: Orvis Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The grant funds we received are utilized to help aid our enrichment program here at the shelter. With the funds, we were able to purchase items that we use daily that can be expensive. Items included Kong spray cheese, chew items (rawhides, yak cheese bones, and other various types of chew items), licky-mats, flirt poles, and Toppls.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

By being able to purchase all these items with the grant funds received, we were able to provide items that we have always wanted for the shelter, but never were able to purchase due to needing them in bulk or they’re being too expensive.

Enrichment items are a huge asset to the shelter, as the dogs are here every day in the kennels alone. Being in a kennel environment creates so much stress for them, and if 30 minutes of chewing a bone, working on a puzzle toy, or playing chase can help them feel better, then the enrichment has created a healthier environment for them.

Many dogs can start to get bored and worn down from being in the kennel, even if they are here for a short time. The “kennel crazies” are a real thing and we try to eliminate them from happening as much as possible. Mental health for the dogs is just as important as, if not more important than, physical health. If their mental health deteriorates, that can create so many actual health problems as a result.

These items will be essential to their overall health while at the shelter, no matter how long or short of a time they are with us. The Kong spray cheese is used with the Licky-mats and the Toppls or Kongs. These puzzle toys are great to keep a dog busy by working to get the cheese out of the item. Sometimes it can last for up to 30 minutes or more, which is a great pastime for them while they are in their kennel.

The rawhides and other chews are great for individual, supervised chew time. This gives the dog time out of their kennel and chewing on something to keep them busy quietly. Not only does this help them decompress from the kennel, but it helps them learn to calm down and have quiet time, which will help them in their new home.

The flirt pole is like a giant cat wand toy for a dog. We help a lot of pit bull-type dogs and they love to chase things! These poles have a small chew/rope toy at the end that they can chase while the human is waving it around and it exerts a lot of their energy, which helps tire them out and decrease boredom and reactivity in the kennel. These poles are great for any kind of dog, but when we have dogs with high energy in the kennel, it is a great way to release a lot of that energy and keep them tired since we cannot get them running all day long.

How many pets did this grant help?

We received the grant funds close to the very end of 2021, so we started using the funds very late in December into January of 2022. We expect to help around 300+ dogs in the next year with the items we have received from the grant funds.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Currently, we have a dog named Ice (first photo) who has been with us since August of 2021. He is a handsome, white pit bull-type mix dog who is only about 2 years old. He has been with us for so long because he has unknown neurological problems. He gets “wobbly” when he walks and leans to the right, which causes him to fall a lot when over-excited.

He is just the sweetest and most joyous dog, but he has recently started to lick his paws excessively due to the stress of being here long-term. We have started using the licky-mats (second photo) and Toppl toys as part of his routine with the Kong cheese. He absolutely LOVES this and we have seen a reduction in the licking of his paws.

Unfortunately, he has not been adopted yet, but we are looking forward to his future of being able to find a family that is drawn to how adorable and sweet he is regardless of his medical issues.

The new enrichment has already created a better outlet for him, which in turn can help us showcase him better and help him relax more for when potential families come to meet with him. It also has reduced the redness and sores he got from licking his paws. You can meet Ice here.

Associated Humane Societies: Orvis Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The Orvis Animal Care Grant was used to help establish additional training protocols within our shelter. We were able to build a relationship with an additional trainer and add enrichment activities to our dogs’ lives during their stay.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped not only with the trainer costs, but with the supplies needed for specific enrichment activities. The trainer was able to assist staff and volunteers with learning new tricks and tips, all bettering the pets’ stay while they’re with us.

How many pets did this grant help?

30 dogs were helped in 2020

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Pikachu was very scared when she first came into our shelter. Pikachu was a senior found as a stray in Newark. Pikachu needed a home as an only pet, so her shelter life was even more stressful than a pet friendly dog’s would be. With some enrichment toys and extra training, Pikachu was able to settle in a bit better before she was (after eight long months) pulled by one of our rescue partners.

SPCA of Brevard: Orvis Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

We purchased heavy-duty enrichment toys for our dogs to have in their kennels. They are different shapes, sizes, and colors. We wanted to provide safe chew toys to help with kennel stress and boredom.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant provided us with the means to make a large purchase of these toys so that we had at least one for each dog. Being able to make this large purchase will make it much easier, financially, to purchase more, a little at a time. Our goal with this grant was to be able to purchase enough for every dog — and we did!

How many pets did this grant help?

200+

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

For Ole Blue (first photo), toys are life! He loves all toys, and loves them even more when you play fetch with them. He might not be a spring chicken, but you’d never know it with as much as he likes to play! Give him toys and put him in the pool and he is the happiest dude around.

(As I write this, he is in a meet-and-greet with a potential adopter.)

Meet Ole Blue here.

The Animal Foundation: Orvis Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Funds were used to purchase two durable, specially designed pools for our dogs to use in enrichment activities.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Having durable pools for our shelter dogs to use gives them more opportunities for play and healthy exercise outside of their kennels while helping them to stay cool in the hot months here in Las Vegas. These outdoor opportunities also help our staff to better observe the dogs’ behavior and gather information on how best to promote individual dogs for adoption.

Ultimately, these enrichment activities help our shelter dogs have greater wellbeing during their time in the shelter and find homes more quickly.

How many pets did this grant help?

310 (so far!)

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Bruce, a 3-year-old shepherd mix (first and second photos), has been in and out of the shelter three times in the last two years. During his first stay with us in 2020, he showed signs of reactivity toward other dogs while on-leash. When he came back to us as an owner-surrender in 2021, he was experiencing kennel neurosis and barrier frustration towards other dogs.

But when he started coming to our dog playgroups, he just blossomed! He loved playing and running with the other dogs and was a big fan of the bone pool, always jumping in and out of the pool, trying to get other dogs to go swimming with him. His kennel neurosis and barrier frustration decreased dramatically.

He was adopted on Oct. 25, 2021, by a lovely couple who just adore him. They got him a trainer and he is adjusting very well to his new home! We are so grateful for the impact of the pools and other enrichment activities on Bruce and so many other dogs like him!

Humane Society of Henderson County: Orvis Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The money was used to purchase stimulating items, interactive toys, and other enrichment items for our shelter canines. We bought chew toys, treats, “Adopt Me” bandanas, etc.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped our organization purchase new items for all of our canines. Our items were old and were literally worn out. The dogs are loving having the toys with the treats in them that they have to work hard to get out. This helps keep them occupied instead of just sitting in their kennels.

How many pets did this grant help?

140 this month, but it will continue to enrich dogs for months. We hope we have enough toys to last at least one year and hopefully longer.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Hi, my name is Diesel! I’m a sweet guy who has had a really rough start to life. I survived parvo as a puppy and I sometimes guard my good around other dogs. However, I arrived at the shelter severely dehydrated and emaciated, so my resource-guarding is due to my history of starvation rather than aggression.

The great people at the shelter are feeding me and getting me healthy again, slowly but surely. I am very well-mannered and house trained. I am up-to-date on vaccines and will receive my rabies vaccination when I get neutered. I’m such a sweetie and really deserve a good home to grow up in!

(Diesel has several adoptions applications, so we think he will be in his new home within a few days.)

Crate Escape Rescue, Inc.: Orvis Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

With the awarded grant money, we were able to put seven pups through basic/puppy training classes.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The seven pups in our organization were able to attend two months of basic training/ puppy training classes. These classes not only helped introduce basic skills and commands to pups coming directly out of the shelter, they gave each and every one of them a solid training and basic-skills foundation which they will take with them to their forever homes.

How many pets did this grant help?

7

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Cannoli and Cream Puff were abandoned at a rural shelter in North Carolina as unwanted pups due to their unruly behavior. At just about 4 months old, they were really coming out of their shells and their behavior was progressing in the wrong direction. Fortunately, because they were still puppies, Cannoli and Cream Puff could easily turn that behavior around with the proper guidance.

They entered puppy class as crazy, unfocused puppies who had a minimal skill set. While they continue to attend puppy class, build their skills, and learn how to be good doggy citizens, both have come leaps and bounds since beginning the classes. They now know how to walk on a leash and obey basic commands and have mastered their house training. Overall they have become better with their manners and polished up their social skills with canines and humans in addition to mastering their basic puppy skills.

Both Cannoli and Cream Puff will now have a solid training foundation when they continue on to their forever homes. With basic training almost complete, this makes them a lot more attractive to potential adopters, and it will also make their transitions into their forever homes a lot less stressful on both pups and adoptive families.

Cannoli and Cream Puff could have easily become victims of being “returns” due to behavior issues, not only now but in the future. It was vital that these puppies received the proper guidance to help mold them into forever pups and to help them reach their full puppy potential before their issues escalated. We are extremely grateful that this duo was able to get the quality start to life they desperately needed.

Coconino Humane Association: Orvis Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The grant funds were used to purchase canine enrichment toys, puzzle bowls, snuffle mats, supplies for pup-pops, and the supplies to make PVC food-dispenser toys.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant funds helped us ensure that the dogs in our care get good brain stimulation through working for treats, chewing, and playing. This helps to keep stress levels down, prevent boredom, and keep noise levels down.

How many pets did this grant help?

50-100 at a time!

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Caro (first three photos) was adopted from us as a puppy. Her adopters underestimated how much time and energy it takes to raise a puppy into a well-adjusted dog. She was kept in a crate during the day, allowed to have the zoomies for a bit, and then it was bedtime. She was not getting the opportunity to exert energy or use her brain.

After getting into trouble by chewing the wall, chewing the new couch, regularly jumping on the toddler, and finally nipping the toddler’s arm when he tried to push her away from his food, Caro was returned to the shelter.

Caro was a wild girl! She needed to learn manners and redirection and to be better socialized with people and other dogs. The puzzle and interactive toys helped to give her something to work on while she was in her kennel.

Our trainer worked with her on impulse control and “sit/stay,” with rope and plush toys to play with in between lessons. After nearly two months of daily training, ball-chasing, play groups, and volunteer love and walks, Caro was ready to be adopted!

Humane Society of Memphis and Shelby County: Orvis Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Orvis Animal Care Grant funds were used to purchase enrichment items for our shelter animals. Our shelter is a no-kill shelter and animals in our care stay as long as they need to find a loving forever home. In 2020/21, the average length of stay for dogs in our shelter was 41 days and we have had three dogs stay with us for 12 to 15 months.

It is vitally important that our dogs stay engaged and get mental stimulation and physical exercise, and have items to help reduce anxiety and frustration. We have a full-time animal behavior specialist on staff who has developed excellent protocols to ensure our dogs stay happy and healthy during their time with us.

With this grant, we purchased items to be part of our shelter’s daily enrichment plans. Enrichment items we purchased were: a Manners Minder treat dispenser, flirt poles, a lure course (this item ended up being donated), food puzzles, Freedom No-Pull Harnesses, Nylabones, and a Klimb platform.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped our organization and our dogs by providing important equipment that is and will be used to provide enrichment activities for our dogs so they stay engaged and receive mental stimulation and physical exercise to help reduce anxiety and frustration and promote their overall health and well-being.

How many pets did this grant help?

800

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

As part of the Orvis grant, we were able to purchase three flirt poles that are in daily use by staff and volunteers with our animals, especially the high-energy, adolescent dogs.

One of longer-term residents, Bruce (first photo), is rather difficult to walk because he is so aroused when he is taken out of his kennel. While he is walking, he will grab the leash and wrestle with the walker, who is struggling to keep him under control. Often, this has resulted in Bruce not being walked for the amount of time he needs for exercise, mental stimulation, and socialization. We discovered that if he is taken off leash in a play yard and allowed to chase the flag at the end of the flirt pole until he has tired, we can then put the leash back on him and walk him without him biting and tugging on the leash. You can meet Bruce here.

We also purchased, with part of the grant funds, a Blue-9 Klimb platform. This elevated deck is used in the basic manners training that we do for our dogs. We have a female cattle dog, Dingo (second photo), who was struggling with her training because she could not stay focused on the trainer. When she loses focus, she will disengage from the trainer and run around in the training area, sniffing and picking up any objects she can find and jumping on tables and chairs.

When we introduced the platform into her training routine, she quickly responded in a positive way. The raised platform defined the space she was to stay in while she was working on the behaviors we were teaching her, such as lie down, sit, hand-targeting, stay, etc. It helped her focus on the trainer rather than the distractions in the area around her. You can meet Dingo here.

HELP The Animals, Inc.: Orvis Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

To purchase new Kuranda beds, as well as new martingale collars and leashes, for the approximately 45 dogs we have on the premises each day.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It helped immensely with the comfort and safety of the pets in our care. We have been patching and repairing Kuranda beds for a long time, but eventually each has to be retired and used for parts. Kuranda beds provide a bit of comfort that no number of blankets on a cement floor can match, and dogs love them.

New leashes and martingale collars allow for safer handling and transport of animals in and out of kennels as well as on walks and trips to the vet or other destinations. Our staff and volunteers are especially grateful for these.

How many pets did this grant help?

About 50 so far, though it will continue to help many of the dogs who will pass through our doors for years to come.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Dixie is one of our older dogs (she’s about 7-8 years old), and our longest-term canine resident. She needs a home without children or other pets, as well as an attentive and experienced dog handler, so placement of her has proven very difficult and she has already been returned a couple of times.

She is a staff favorite, though, and got one of the very first new Kuranda beds we assembled. The one previously in her kennel had been repaired many times and really should have been retired previously, but we had nothing to replace it with.

A long-term resident with behavioral challenges like Dixie may not sound like a great success story, but every shelter has long-term residents with whom we form very strong bonds and who deserve to live as comfortably as possible. We love and remember them long after we may have forgotten the easier ones who pass through quickly, and a new bed means more to her (and to us) than we can express. Thank you for supporting us with this grant. You can meet Dixie here.