Orvis Animal Care Grant

Naperville Area Humane Society: Orvis Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The grant funds were used to purchase a variety of enrichment items for our shelter dogs. One of the newest forms of enrichment that we as a shelter are doing is canine nose-work. We have wonderful volunteers, one of whom is a trainer at a nearby facility, who have donated time teaching nose-work seminars. We had the knowledge of the sport, but we were lacking the supplies to really utilize the sport in the shelter.

This grant allowed us to purchase nose-work kits and supplies so that we are now able to have shelter dogs participate in the nose-work sport. We also used some of the funding towards our new ball pits that we have in our outdoor play areas. All dogs seem to jump on board with this new enrichment area. Even the more reserved dogs all let their curiosity get the best of them and they spend copious amounts of time investigating the ball pit. A well-worth investment for the dogs — so thanks again!

Another major addition to our dog enrichment calendar included the purchase of fleece and rubber mats for snuffle mats. The material used to create these mats was purchased and then the children in our humane-education classes assemble the mats and hand them out to the shelter dogs. It is a wonderful project, and really gives the children a sense of fulfillment to see the joy the mats bring to the dogs. Lastly, the funding went to puzzle games and dog treats that are used daily and integrated in all the enrichment plans from the grant request.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant allowed our staff, volunteers, and humane-education students all to participate together to better the quality of life for our shelter dogs. We are so very fortunate to have had this grant awarded to our shelter, as it allowed us to improve daily enrichment for the shelter dogs. We work off a daily enrichment calendar that is updated regularly and provides the dogs with a variety of mental and physical stimulation. This was all made possible because of the Orvis Animal Care Grant; the funding has allowed us to improve our enrichment that we provide to the dogs. Everything purchased through this grant can be used multiple times and will continue to provide enrichment for shelter dogs for years to come.

How many pets did this grant help?

This grant will help about 300 dogs/year and about 25 dogs/month.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

This grant helped one of our longer-term residents, Jillian, who I am happy to report has been adopted. Jillian was beginning to experience kennel frustration, so it was imperative that our animal-care staff provided her with daily enrichment. In addition to walks and daily playtime, Jillian would eat each meal out of a puzzle. The puzzles were purchased with this funding as well, and continuous to help our dogs who are too smart for their own good. Jillian also loved snuffle-mat and nose-work time, two puzzle-like games that worked her brain. She also was a regular participant in the ball pit as well as a year-round Easter-egg hunt champion. We would hide plastic eggs filled with treats around the outdoor area that she would seek out and pop open. It was because of this regular enrichment that Jillian was able to remain here with a sense of stability until she found her forever home.

Ruff Start Rescue: Orvis Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The funds were spent on the purchase of 83 medium and large Kongs and Extreme Kongs for our larger rescue dogs.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Kongs are such a popular item among our rescue dogs and foster families. These toys serve to promote quality enrichment, mental stimulation and constructive activities to distract the dogs from getting into things they aren’t supposed to. These toys are also well constructed to be more durable and accommodate those dogs who are more aggressive chewers. Further, toys that are more durable diminish the chance of injury or the possibility of swallowing pieces of toys that can be a risk to the dogs’ health. We are grateful for these Kong toys as they are easy to clean and transfer to other foster animals more easily than our cloth toys.

How many pets did this grant help?

83+

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Gunner (first and second photo) is a black Lab who was found on the side of the road. He had a leg injury and it was assumed he was hit by a car. Unfortunately, his owners were never found. With time, his leg healed and Gunner is filled with lots of young puppy energy. The Kong toy provided the perfect enrichment activity to help him burn some of his energy and keep him out of trouble.

Mitchel (third photo) is a deaf dog who suffers from seizures. Due to his health conditions, he has some aggression issues that prevent him from getting a lot of exercise outside of the home or with other dogs in the foster home. Mitchel was given a Kong full of peanut butter and was thrilled with his new toy. Mitchel was always a happy dog, but now he is extra happy to have a toy that keeps his jaws busy and limits the destruction of his toys. On a side note, Mitchel has been responding well to his new medication and has been seizure-free for two months. Meet him: http://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/39623414

Ready 2 Rescue: Orvis Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The money we received was used to purchase dental treats, toys, bones, treats, interactive toys, and Kong treat-holder toys.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Our dogs are kept in a pet lodge, where they can play in doggy daycare every day to stay social with other dogs, and there are times when the dogs had to stay in their rooms (nap time and overnight). Some of the dogs, especially the bigger dogs and the dogs not yet spayed/neutered (who could not play in daycare until spayed/neutered) would get frustrated or bored having to stay in their rooms. We wanted to provide the dogs with activities and things to keep them physically occupied (such as chewing) and mentally active, to keep them from developing undesirable behaviors due to frustration and boredom. The dogs have been much happier, with less frustration, when they have things to keep them occupied in their rooms!

How many pets did this grant help?

20+

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We had a small shepherd mix named Alaska in our rescue. We pulled her from a local shelter that was needing to get her out because she’d been there too long. She was a happy-go-lucky girl who loved to play and loved attention. After we had her for a bit, she started to develop some bad habits, such as being nippy and getting too rough with the other dogs. She had a less-than-perfect meet-and-greet where she did not get adopted due to her behavior, so we knew something had to change.

We started doing some basic training with her, and she proved to be incredibly intelligent! She learned VERY quickly and retained what she had learned from week to week. This helped with her behaviors some, but we still had some work to do. We received the Orvis grant from the Petfinder Foundation and knew we needed to focus on this girl first. We purchased a large chew bone and a Kong toy that we could put treats inside specifically for her. She LOVED them both and always had them during her nap times and overnights.

You could see a difference in her attitude pretty quickly. With just a little time with training and things to keep her occupied and mentally challenged, she again became the happy girl we’d first had. The next meet-and-greet was a SUCCESS! She was adopted by a gentleman who was planning on training her for security work as well as to be a great companion at home!

Partnership for Paws, Inc.: Orvis Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

This grant was used to provide obedience training for several of our dogs in order to make them more adoptable.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Training is a very important part of rescue, as most of the dogs we pull from shelters ended up there because of a lack of training. The typical cost to use professional training for dogs who require it is $200-300 per dog.

How many pets did this grant help?

Four dogs were helped by this grant

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

This is Scout. He was rescued after being found as a stray with his two sisters. They were living off of leftover fish guts and parts that they were getting from the trash outside of a local fish market. These dogs were semi-feral and had been living off the streets for some time. In order to bring them to rescue, they had to be trapped. They were very skittish and fearful of being handled by humans. After giving them a lot of love and patience, we were able to get them to the point where they could walk on a leash and attend obedience-training classes, mostly just for the socialization aspect. Scout and his sisters flourished with this training and Scout found a forever home in June! We are very grateful for the generosity of Orvis and the Petfinder Foundation, which allowed us to pay for the training they so desperately needed. Thank you!

Haven to Home Canine Rescue: Orvis Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Funding from the Orvis grant was used to purchase puzzle games, Kong toys and calming toys, agility and nose-work equipment (including weave poles, a jump, and a scent kit), and training tools (including harnesses, leashes, muzzles, clickers, and halters).

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Kennel environments are often frustrating and overwhelming for incoming dogs and can exacerbate unwanted behaviors. Funding from the Orvis grant was used to purchase items that will help alleviate this stress and enrich the lives of dogs at our rescue for years to come. The tools acquired through this grant, such as the agility and nose-work equipment, have enabled volunteers to work more closely with kenneled dogs and build relationships founded on trust, thus providing for vital social enrichment prior to adoption. The Kong toys purchased from this grant are filled with either peanut butter or yogurt and are distributed to the dogs to keep them busy between kennel shifts. The calming toys assist in reducing stress, while the puzzle games provide added mental stimulation. The training tools acquired through this grant are essential to rehabilitating dogs in need. Muzzles, for example, have been used to secure the safety of both the dog and the volunteer, while clickers have been used to shape new, positive behaviors. These tools may ultimately increase the adoptability of some of our more challenging dogs by better enabling us to address problem behaviors resulting from previous trauma or neglect. Ultimately, the items provided by this grant have made it possible for us to introduce mentally stimulating and enriching activities to dogs at our rescue that would not have been available otherwise.

How many pets did this grant help?

Ten so far, and more than 150 dogs are expected to benefit from this grant, as items will be used until they are beyond repair.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

One of the dogs who has benefited greatly from this grant is Ava (first photo). Ava is a beautiful white shepherd mix who loves to cuddle and spend time with her foster family. Ava was not doing well with the other large female dog in her previous home and came to us as a timid dog who prefers peace and quiet. She is very affectionate and has been described as an “old soul” in a young body. The Comfort Zone calming vest acquired through the Orvis grant helps keep Ava calm and confident during times when she may feel overwhelmed or anxious. This alleviation of stress has enabled Ava to better transition into her foster family and will ultimately help her as she transitions into a permanent adoptive home.

Domino (second photo) is another dog who has greatly benefited from this grant. He is an intelligent, energetic cattle dog mix who requires mental stimulation beyond that of typical dogs who come into our rescue. Domino came to our rescue after he was tied out and abandoned by a previous owner. Walks and playing sessions are not enough to satisfy his drive and energy level. Thanks to the Petfinder Foundation and the Orvis grant, Domino is now able to expend his energy through stimulating puzzle games, nose-work sessions, and agility training. Domino absolutely loves playing with his weave poles (pictured) and jump set! Through the use of these tools, Domino has become more engaged with volunteers and has truly blossomed as a happy, intelligent working companion. Use of these items helps to channel Domino’s energy in a positive, constructive way and enables him to become enriched both mentally, physically, and socially while waiting for his permanent adoptive home. Meet him: http://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/41171713

A third dog who has benefited from the use of this grant is Maverick (third and fourth photos). Maverick is a loving, friendly pit bull mix who has been waiting for his forever home since 2015. He is affectionate, intelligent, and loves spending time with volunteers and his foster family. He spent the majority of his life in a confined space, away from other people and dogs. Because of this, he needed to learn how to properly interact with other dogs and strangers. Thanks to the training items purchased through the Orvis grant, Maverick has been able to acquire a solid foundation of obedience skills while waiting for a permanent adoptive home. The use of his Halti enables him to be more secure on daily walks, while allowing his foster family to feel more at ease when exercising him. As Maverick continues on his journey for a forever home, the items acquired through the Orvis grant will continue to enrich his life at our rescue and prepare him for the next chapter in his story. Meet him: http://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/38468226

Casa de Love Animal Rescue: Orvis Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

We provided training classes for one of our dogs, Zinnia, who was slated to be euthanized in the shelter because of aggressiveness due to fear. She has been working with someone for a few months now and staying in their home and is getting better. She is still not at point where she can be adopted, but we believe we will get there.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant enable us to get a little fearful dog out of the shelter and have her someone work with her.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Zinnia was going to be euthanized in the shelter for being aggressive. We could see the behavior was fear-based and she was not aggressive for any other reason. She was very reactive and would try to bite if you came near her. We were able to get her out and place her in a home with someone who works with fear-aggressive dogs. She is still being worked with but is getting better little by little, and we believe that she will be able to be adopted into a loving home eventually. Underneath all of that fear she is a very sweet little dog.

Valley Animal Haven & Adoption Center: Orvis Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The grant was used to purchase pools and misters for our main kennel areas to keep the rescue cool during the summer months. Our kennel area can get very warm, especially in the summer. The misters allow our kennel areas to keep cool and the pools provide extra recreation for our animals to play and have fun in. The products purchased allow us to greatly improve the quality of care within our facility.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant assisted our organization in keeping our animals nice and cool during the warm summer months. The misters are on during the afternoons and the pools are routinely cleaned and replenished for our dogs to play in during the summer.

How many pets did this grant help?

60 dogs

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

This grant specifically helped our long-term residents find some recreation. The dogs in our facility can keep nice and cool in the summer months, and the quality of life offered for our animals is increased. Overall, the grant helped us increase adoption outcomes because our animals are happier and experiencing significant stress reduction. One dog helped in particular is Leo (first photo), a basset hound mix who is about 5 years old. He was surrendered to our organization because his owners were moving and decided that they would not move with him. Leo was heartbroken and very depressed while in the kennel areas.

Over the course of several months, our staff learned that Leo loved playing with water. When we would be hosing the kennels, he would get extremely excited and would try to immerse himself with the water in his kennel area. Through the grant, we purchased pools for our kennel area and Leo was one of the first dogs to experience one of them. He loves rolling and playing in the water! About six months later, Leo was adopted by a family who loves to go to the marina. They wanted a dog who wasn’t afraid to get down and dirty and play with the family in the water. Leo was the perfect match for the family!

Atlas (second photo) is a shepherd mix who is about 2 years old. Atlas is a special-needs dog, as he experiences seizures and requires medication. We noticed that his seizures would be worse during the summer, as temperatures can reach up to 113 degrees in this area. When we introduced the pool to his kennel, he fell in love with it. He would stay in the pool to keep nice and cool and would also play with his toys in the water. The pool gave him a great opportunity to enjoy some recreation and keep himself from overheating during the summer. Atlas was eventually adopted by a couple seeking a special-needs dog for their special-needs child.

Dahloenga-Lumpkin County Humane Society/TLC: Orvis Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The money was used to improve our big and small dog parks. We wanted to add stimulating activities and enrichment for the dogs and puppies, where we could also teach obedience. We bought obstacle courses, things to jump through and over, doggy pools and sand pits, and tug-of-war stands; we also remembered the people who help out and bought two giant umbrellas and picnic tables.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped us with the animals because our yearly funding for maintenance went into our attic, as we had to install new insulation. With this grant, we were able to give the dogs a new play area.

How many pets did this grant help?

30-50. It will also help any dog who comes in the future.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

This grant helped two of our dogs specifically. The first dog is Andreas (first photo). Andreas was hit by a car two years ago and needed emergency surgery to his back legs. With the new dog parks, we are able to get him the exercise he needs and wants. He loves to play tug-of-war and run around, and little by little we have been able to strengthen his back legs. Andreas’s story: Andreas is that one dog who everyone feels bad for. Andreas was hit by a car and left in a ditch to die. Animal Control came out to get him and they were lucky enough to find his owner. His owner was unable to take care of Andreas, so he was surrendered to Animal Control. We then transferred Andreas into our shelter so that he could get the help he so desperately needed. He went through multiple surgeries for his dislocated hip and broken leg. He spent a few months recovering at our vet and he is finally healthy enough to come to the shelter! He still has a little trouble walking and will need to be on joint supplements for the rest of his life, but he just the BEST dog. Meet him: http://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/39534094

The other dog is Garth (second photo). Garth loved to dig, and in his run, he would make a very muddy mess and tear up toys. With the grant money, we bought a sand pit and we were able to hide toys and treats in it, which he loved. With this, he has stopped digging in his run. Meet him: http://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/41378338

Rebel Rescue Inc.: Orvis Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Mainly the money was used for educating the youth about specific dog breeds. We also used it for better shelter enclosures, food, vetting and any special needs the dogs may have. We built them dog beds so they did not have to lie on the ground or hard floor and they now have an area in which they can be turned out daily for play and exercise.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant money helped us provide our animals with good nourishment and vet care, along with better, larger housing for our rescue dogs. We deal with a specific of breed dogs who are hard to adopt out, so we make sure they are healthy and we educate people about the breed; we also train the dogs so that everyone knows what to expect and these dogs have a chance for healthy, happy lives.

How many pets did this grant help?

53

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Clancy is a pitbull mix who was scheduled to be euthanized at Victoria County Animal Control. We were able to pull him into our rescue. At the time he arrived, he had a pretty bad case of demodex, which is a form of mange. He only weighed 54 lbs., which is small for a dog his size. After treating him with special shampoos, making sure he had a good diet, and putting him through behavior training, he was healed and able to be placed for adoption. The good news is that Clancy’s weight is now 78 lbs. and he is healthy, happy and has been adopted into a loving home. None of this could have happened without the grant money from the Petfinder Foundation, which allowed us to better care for our animals.

Valley Animal Haven: Orvis Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The Orvis Animal Care Grant provided lifesaving emergency veterinary services for an adoptable dog in our rescue named Amazon.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

See below.

How many pets did this grant help?

One dog

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

This grant help us save the life of Amazon, who received substantial injuries while she was recovering from parvovirus. Amazon sustained substantial injuries while in a secure holding area. She required immediate emergency medical care to save her life from an injury to her front right paw area. The veterinary fees associated with this emergency procedure cost our organization substantial costs. Amazon spent about five weeks in recovery and was adopted in February 2018 (second photo). Amazon is doing amazing and her new owners absolutely love and adore her.