Orvis Animal Care Grant

Kauai Humane Society: Orvis Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The money provided for by this grant went to several different enrichment toys and tools. We purchased ball launchers so that our staff could throw balls to the dogs in our play yards much farther than by hand. We are using a few different types of these launchers in order to evaluate which one is the most popular with our animals. The dog puzzles, treat-dispensing games, and fun feeder bowls are all part of our mental-stimulation program that offers our dogs the chance to think and activate their minds while playing. We notice an increase in calm behavior and general well-being when dogs are using these tools. Several of our products also aid in teeth-cleaning, so these toys offer the chance for dogs to receive physical stimulation while also improving their oral health. Our dog pools are another product that is enjoyed by our dogs; they provide environmental stimulation, and are a favorite with several.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant has helped us to increase the mental and physical enrichment, as well as the behavioral and environmental stimulation, of the dogs in our care. Offering these tools is key to keeping a high quality of life for the animals at our humane society and ensuring that they are receiving the best care possible. Without this grant, the number of toys, diversity of toys, and quality of activities available for the dogs in the play yards would not be as high.

How many pets did this grant help?

Over the past six months, this have been more than 75 dogs who have benefited.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Bingo (first photo) is one of our adoptable dogs who has especially enjoyed our mental and physical enrichment and stimulation program. He especially loves our dog wading pools and will play in the water, splash around, and have so much fun, he never wants to leave! He is a 20-month-old retriever and Labrador mix who was brought in as a stray in July of this year. He is very energetic, loves treats, and is very sweet. We have included some photos of him. He was transferred to one of our mainland partner agencies, East Bay SPCA on Oct. 11.

Cooper's Chance Animal Rescue: Orvis Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Grant funds were used to purchase enrichment items, toys and treats for our shelter pets to reduce stress and anxiety, helping them to get adopted faster.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant helped us to purchase enrichment items to engage our shelter pets for training, reduce stress and anxiety, and help build trust; this helps the pet to be adoptable faster and transition into a new home more easily.

How many pets did this grant help?

200

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Barkley was surrendered to the shelter after his family moved and couldn’t take him with them. Barkley was devastated, scared and confused when we rescued him and brought him to safety in a loving foster home. The poor guy was shut down, refused even the yummiest of treats and wouldn’t eat regular food. His foster mom began to gain his trust slowly by offering him a Nobbly Wobbly toy stuffed with peanut butter (first photo), which he loved. After a few days, she was able to hand-feed him, and soon he was standing with the rest of the pack eating his kibble, confident and happy. He was adopted by a great family, and he still enjoys peanut-butter stuffing!

Demi's Animal Rescue: Orvis Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Our $992 Orvis grant is currently being used for behavior-modification training of three dogs to get them ready for adoption. We used $119.12 to purchase necessary training and enrichment tools such as four Gentle Leader head collars, four Kong toys, and training treats. The remaining $872.88 is covering the training costs.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The Orvis grant is supplying these dogs with necessary behavior modification to assist in issues such as separation anxiety and under-socialization resulting in minor aggression, and to work on confidence-building. These components go beyond the standard training our dogs get – walking on a leash, potty-training, and basic commands (sit, stay, etc.). The reason for this is that these three dogs demonstrated escalated behavior issues that we feel are barriers to their adoptions. Each of these dogs has been residing in a foster home, making it easy for us to detect their behavior issues and monitor the progress they’re making. The training sessions are being completed by Marie and Tyson of Canine/Feline Behavioral Counseling, and we estimate their training will be completed by the end of September.

How many pets did this grant help?

3

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Creflo (first photo) has had a long but sheltered life. He spent his 10 years alive with one person in one home (second photo). He was not introduced to the outside world, making his new life, since his owner died, very scary. When Creflo’s owner passed away, a local shelter in Southern Colorado asked if we could bring him to Denver for a chance at adoption.

Demi’s Animal Rescue decided to bring him in and sent him to a foster who was ready to relax with an old dog. Unfortunately, within the first 24 hours, Creflo’s fear began to show through. He was refusing to get off the couch and proceeded to growl and snap at the foster parents.

He was immediately relocated to another foster home, where he spent months slowly gaining his confidence in a new environment. He progressed from refusing to go out to the yard to making it to the end of the driveway, and eventually was able to go for short walks around the block. After some time, Creflo had to once again move to another foster home for snapping and growling at the husband in the home.

This time we got Creflo into one of our most experienced foster homes that has taken behavior cases for us before. Since his arrival, he has blossomed with the other dogs, but things have continued to be a challenge, such as trying to get him in a car for vet appointments. We have found a mobile groomer to slowly work with him to trim his nails and remove his mats. While we work on a mobile vet to see if he may be in some pain due to his arthritis, Marie of Canine/Feline Behavioral Counseling is helping him adjust to the new world around him.

He is being helped to become socialized to new things and to allow people to complete tasks that are necessary for his health and quality of life.

Despite these issues, he still gets along well with other dogs and he’s really sweet – which makes us feel like he’s still worthy of being adopted to a good home.

So here’s how the trainings going to help him: Training will help him realize that his new world isn’t so scary and people are around to take care of him and help him live out the rest of his years to the fullest. Training will also help his new adopter gain the ability to get him where he needs to go and to take care of him properly by managing grooming, vet visits, nail trimmings, etc.

Given his cranky and grumpy disposition and the challenges of transporting him, the trainer comes to him.

He has not been adopted yet, but we have high hopes! And we are happy to follow up with the Petfinder Foundation once he has. Creflo’s listing can be found here.

The other two dogs who were chosen to benefit from the Orvis grant are also still in our care, but getting close to being adoption-ready! One is a small dog named Coco (third and fourth photos) whom we took from an abusive owner. We thought she was ready to be adopted, but she was quickly returned due to conflict with the other dog in the home. We are reevaluating her, as some new concerning behaviors have shown up. We are going to let her decompress and work with Marie to build her confidence so that the next home she enters will be the last! Coco’s listing is currently inactive due to the demand for her breed. We are waiting for her training to be complete before making her available and searching for the right home.

The last dog’s name is Ellie (fifth and sixth photos); she is getting help with her lack of confidence and under-socialization, which are causing concerning behaviors. She is very new to our organization and we are starting off her journey with us by letting her decompress and helping her adjust to her new surroundings while Marie guides the foster parents on how to prepare her for adoption.

Ellie’s listing can be found here.

Marshall County Animal Control: Orvis Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The Orvis grant money was used for enrichment items at our dog shelter. We were able to purchase items that the dogs would otherwise not receive while staying at the shelter. The items included a radio and rechargeable batteries for music enrichment, dog treats, Kong toys, baby pools for cooling down and baths, blankets, leashes for going on walks with volunteers, and shampoo. It’s like Christmas at the dog shelter!

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It’s very obvious that music calms the dogs. We house an average of 35 dogs within one building, so music has a great calming effect. All the dogs love their daily treats and walking with volunteers on their new leashes. Another big hit among the dogs are the cow ears and Dentastix. All these wonderful enrichment items reduce the overall stress level of each dog.

How many pets did this grant help?

100 or more

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Poor Lolita (first photo) is currently the resident who’s been with us the longest. She enjoys the radio being by her kennel. She gets excited to get a daily treat. She is thrilled to go for walks with volunteers now that there is an adequate supply of good leashes available. Lolita’s favorite treat is cow ears! She was also able to enjoy a cool-down bath in the baby pool twice already. She’s an easy girl to please, but it’s heartwarming to know we can now provide her and many others with an added bonus on each of their days with us.

Lolita is still available for adoption but has a commitment from a rescue organization and will be transported in two weeks. Meet Lolita here.

Welfare for Animals Guild (WAG): Orvis Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Travel expenses for prison trips $117.12
Dog food and treats 705.34
Medicine and first aid (Cosequin) 120.07
Training supplies 57.47
TOTAL $1,000.00

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Our 2019 Orvis Animal Care grant supported WAG’s Clallam Bay Corrections Center (CBCC) Program for three months. In the CBCC Program, puppies and dogs received the training and socialization they need in order to be suitable for adoption. Dogs in the program were paired with the incarcerated trainers, who cared for them around the clock every day. Additionally, WAG volunteers traveled to the prison weekly to visit the dogs and discuss training issues with the handlers. Some of the dogs who participate in the program require serious rehabilitation. They stay as long as required to pass the American Kennel Club obedience test. Thus, during the grant period, we had animals who graduated and were adopted, some who completed training and are now back at the WAG Ranch and eligible for adoption, and some who are still working on their training at the prison. Our Orvis Animal Care Grant provided food, treats, medicine, and training supplies for the Clallam Bay Corrections Center dogs and puppies, and also covered some of the travel expenses for WAG volunteer visits to the prison.

How many pets did this grant help?

About 50 dogs and puppies in the CBCC program are or will be helped by this grant.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

This grant supported WAG’s Clallam Bay Corrections Center Program, where our rescued puppies and dogs are paired with incarcerated handlers who provide the socialization and training the pups need in order to be adoptable. We would like to highlight the stories of three dogs who participated in the prison program during the grant period.

Chief (first photo) is a handsome male staghound who recently celebrated his first birthday. He belonged to a single man who fell on hard times and gave his puppy to friends who owned a farm, hoping to secure a happy future for him. But because of Chief’s high prey drive, common to his breed, he did not do well living on a farm and surrounded by chickens and other small animals. Luckily, the farmers entrusted with his care brought Chief to WAG. By this time, Chief had high anxiety and not many house manners, as he had always lived outside. During his prison training, he was able to overcome most of his anxiety and learn how to live as an inside pet. In May, our magnificent Chief was adopted by an awesome family, including two young children who adore cuddling and playing with him (second and third photo). He now has a big fenced yard, someone at home with him every day to guide and work with him, and even regular outings to the beach!

Sylvee (fourth photo) is a beautiful black and silver husky/shepherd mix, currently only about 7 months old. She was originally from Texas, and was brought to Washington State by a young couple traveling and living in their van. Poor Sylvee was crated all the time and deprived of food. When she was first taken in by WAG, she did not know how to live in a house or even how to eat out of a bowl, though she was remarkably sweet and trusting. Sylvee spent some weeks at WAG, where she came to feel safe, gained weight and confidence, and grew completely healthy. Little Sylvee got lots of attention and care from the volunteers at WAG, who described her as “loving, so patient for a puppy, and a jewel” and “bright, fun, and beautiful; full of spirit.” Once she was ready, Sylvee entered the prison program, where she quickly became a well-adjusted young dog, receiving the basic training she still needed. At the end of July, Sylvee was adopted by a phenomenal couple with an active lifestyle. Not only has she gained a loving home, she now has a wonderful big brother, Koda, with whom she bonded immediately (fifth and sixth photos). Her new family has already sent WAG a video of Sylvee and Koda racing around their beautiful yard together — such a joyous scene!

Andy, a friendly whippet mix/border collie mix (seventh and eighth photos), is 2 years old. He lived for short stints in several homes before being voluntarily relinquished to WAG. Though his former groomer described him as “the ultimate good boy,” Andy did not do well in busy homes and was reactive when overstimulated. With a lot to learn, he is currently at the prison, where he is thriving under the care of a patient and experienced trainer. Young Andy has learned to focus his attention, use his boundless energy wisely, walk calmly on a leash, and obey basic commands — and now he is ready for his forever home! Sleek and athletic, young Andy loves to play ball, is built for agility and other canine sports, and would make a great hiking partner. He is already housetrained and would love a canine companion. This striking guy is going to be a fantastic companion for his lucky adopter! You can find out more about Andy here.

Paris Animal Welfare Society: Orvis Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

This grant was used to purchase interactive toys for our dogs.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This opportunity gave us more ways to stimulate our dogs and keep them happy and healthy while in our care! With many interactive toys, such as Jolly Balls and treat-dispensing toys, we have been able to continue improving our enrichment standards. Our pups were extremely happy to receive toys that encourage them to think and figure out how to work around the toy.

How many pets did this grant help?

700 (so far, about 200, but we anticipate this for a year)

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Gabby was brought to PAWS on June 4, 2019, weighing only 21.8 lbs. After she was examined by our veterinarian, it was concluded that Gabby should weigh between 45-50 lbs. Unfortunately, due to severe neglect, Gabby refused to eat for several days. Our staff had to administer several medications, fluids, and calorie supplements for many weeks.

We are happy to say that Gabby went to a transport partner just this week (July 22) weighing 40 lbs.! During her stay, Gabby LOVED the Jolly Balls and treat-dispensing toys! To see the look on her face, and on our staffers’ faces when we witnessed her play for the first time, was priceless. Thank you for such an amazing opportunity to give back to our pups!

The first picture is of her at intake; the second is the morning of her being loaded to find her forever home!

Capital Area Humane Society: Orvis Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

This money was used to purchase enrichment supplies for the dogs in our care. We purchased agility equipment, supplies to build an A-frame, scent-work supplies, speakers and music, and freedom harnesses.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

More mental stimulation and exercise has greatly improved many of our dogs’ behavior in their kennels, leading to many harder-to-place dogs getting adopted.

How many pets did this grant help?

2500

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Gunner was a very high-energy, large dog who was helped with this grant funding. His new freedom harness gave volunteers the confidence to take him on walks on the trails around our large pond. He can be jumpy and mouthy, he likes to play tug with his leash, and he pulls on walks. Combined with his large size, he was spending most of his time in his kennel, because his behavior is a lot for the average volunteer to manage. With his harness, not only was his pulling under control, but he couldn’t grab his leash, either. Gunner also adored running up and down our new A-frame and using the rest of the agility equipment. More frequent exercise significantly reduced his mouthiness, and we put an adorable picture of him enjoying a hike on social media (first photo). The post was popular, and he was adopted a few days later by a nice family who fell in love with him.

Humane Society of Blue Ridge: Orvis Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Money was used for was used for an agility course and fencing.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It helped us with obedience training and giving the dogs a more active lifestyle.

How many pets did this grant help?

Every pet that comes though the shelter

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Oscar is a pit mix we have. He had a lot of pent-up energy where running wasn’t really an option for him. With this agility course, he’s able to run, jump, and exercise, and he’s a lot calmer in the runs during the day. He’s normally barking and jumping like crazy, but now he naps and can’t wait to go back outside. Meet Oscar here.

Columbia Humane Society: Orvis Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

We bought 13 new Kuranda beds with the money given to us by the Orvis Animal Care Grant.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Most dogs now have a Kuranda bed in their inside AND their outside kennels. Kuranda dog beds provide a comfortable place for animals to sleep and spend time resting off the concrete when outside. Being off the floor, they are draft-free and warmer than if they were directly on the floor or even if provided blankets. The outside kennels’ floors are often wet (we are located in Oregon) so the beds provide a nice dry spot, as well. Kuranda beds are also excellent for soft-fabric chewers because leaving bedding material overnight can be dangerous to the dogs’ health.

How many pets did this grant help?

Many more than 13 dogs, because the beds are sanitized and reused many times.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

The Kuranda beds are giving comfort to many dogs. One dog who now has a Kuranda bed both inside and outside is Picassa (first and second photos). Picassa came to the Columbia Humane Society through a Puerto Rico shelter partnership. Picassa had a hard life before coming to the shelter. She has now been at CHS for several months and is allowing her loving and happy nature to show. Still somewhat reserved, she is now taking delight in demonstrating her curious and playful side. She now walks well on a leash and has become a favorite of volunteers. Unless eating or sniffing around her outside kennel (she is a great “scent-hound”), she always sits on her new Kuranda bed, except when she is approached — then she jumps up, wagging her tail vigorously in greeting. Hence, the photographs had to be taken surreptitiously through the wire! She is still available for adoption here.

Another dog, or rather puppy, who is making use of her lovely new Kuranda bed is Fern (third and fourth photos). Fern is a little dynamo from a Texas transport partner. She lives in a foster home much of the time, but comes to the shelter during days when her human is at work. She loves her Kuranda bed to jump on as well as rest on! Here she is, nuzzling a treat ball on her bed. She is still available for adoption here.

Sammy (fifth photo) was featured on Facebook and Instagram enjoying his Kuranda bed with blankets to keep him snuggly while at the shelter. Sammy has already found his forever home!

Humane Animal Treatment Society: Orvis Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Our Orvis grant that we received was used to purchase 12 brand new, durable Kuranda beds for our dog kennel, 13 replacement Kuranda bed legs, 20 martingale collars and 10 leashes for our dogs when they are taken out on volunteer walks.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant really helped our organization by replacing our most well-loved Kuranda beds that have gone through the most wear and tear. Many of the ones we currently had were chewed on the sides, had a missing leg or were just becoming difficult to clean as well as our staff would have liked. By receiving this grant, we were able to purchase brand new ones with a more-washable fabric, and the dogs have been loving them so far.

We had a lot of escape artists in our kennel at one time a few months ago. Since we send our dogs out on walks with volunteers, we need our equipment (leashes, collars, and harnesses) to be reliable and without fault. Unfortunately, flat collars can be easy for a dog to back out of and get loose from. Because of this we chose to put our escape-artist dogs on martingale collars to eliminate this issue for the safety of all.

How many pets did this grant help?

At least 30 already, and countless in the future as more dogs come into our care.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Broggy, a husky mix (first photo), was one of the many dogs who were most helped by this grant. Broggy came to us with porcupine quills in her face. After vet care, she went onto the adoption floor and was able to go on volunteer walks. From the beginning, Broggy was the master of slipping her collar. It was decided that she would go on walks in a harness, but then it took staff five minutes to put her in a harness. It was stressful for both staff and volunteers knowing that Broggy would try and slip her collar every time she went on a walk. When we purchased our first set of martingale collars, Broggy was one of the first dogs who received one. From that moment on, the staff didn’t have to worry about her slipping her collar or fussing with a complicated harness. Broggy was adopted on Oct. 30, 2018!

Reggie, a hound mix (second photo), is a staff favorite and an absolute sweetheart. He is currently at our shelter. He adores his Kuranda bed. Reggie has genetically poor back knees at 6 years old and is currently in laser therapy. He never leaves his bed, and getting a new Kuranda bed helped him stay off the solid concrete floor and support his knees. Reggie is still at our shelter and looking for his forever home. From his Petfinder profile: “I’m a laid-back guy who will let you know when I want attention and love. I can be independent and waddle around doing my own thing, but I still really would like for someone to love me unconditionally. I could possibly live in a home with other dogs if we met first and our personalities are compatible. I could live in a home with feline siblings or children.” You can meet Reggie here.