Orvis Animal Care Grant

Paws for Life Rescue: Orvis Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Grant funds were used to purchase supplies to make flirt-toy poles for the foster dogs in our care. Funds were also used to purchase harnesses needed for the dogs to be on-leash during flirt-pole activities. Our foster dogs benefit from behavior training with flirt poles before they can be adoptable.

Volunteers were organized to help make the flirt poles from donated and purchased supplies. All poles and harnesses can be used for future foster dogs in the rescue. We made more than 30 poles, which will benefit hundreds of dogs, as we will reuse them for years.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We know that the mental stimulation and exercise using flirt poles can provide much-needed enrichment for many of our dogs awaiting adoption. Many of the dogs we pull from [open-intake] shelters are high-energy and highly reactive. During the cold winter months in Michigan, these flirt poles can be utilized indoors to exercise dogs when they’re not able to go outside in extreme temperatures. Both long outdoor poles and short indoor poles are used for the dogs. They are a great training tool for our behavior-challenged dogs who need to work on impulse control, manage energy levels, and practice training commands both on-leash and off-leash. This training tool will help hundreds of dogs to be more adoptable!

How many pets did this grant help?

30 current foster dogs and many future dogs

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Rosa (pictured) is a sweet, fun 3-year-old dog who loves to be rewarded for learning new things. She is eager to train with the new flirt poles, especially with a plush, soft toy at the end of the rope! She is available for adoption through Paws for Life Rescue and you can learn more about her here.

Heartland Animal Shelter: Orvis Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The funds from this grant were used to develop a structured playgroup training program. Using the knowledge obtained at our Dogs Playing for Life Mentorship program and the funds from the Orvis Animal Care grant, we were able to develop a binder of playgroup processes and procedures, create a playgroup tracking system, start a comprehensive training program and get our staff members and volunteers trained to run playgroups for all of the dogs in our care!

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant allowed us the opportunity to develop a training program so that we could teach as many staff and volunteers as possible how to safely and effectively run playgroups. Because of this, all of our dogs are now able to participate in playgroups and we have found this to make them much happier, less stressed and better socialized. Potential adopters also really enjoy seeing our dogs having a great time with other dogs while in playgroups and this has made many of them much more adoptable!

How many pets did this grant help?

250

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Zilda is a young German shepherd who had been returned to the shelter twice in less than four months. Because she had major on-leash dog reactivity and was also one of our biggest, strongest, and most energetic dogs, this posed a challenge all winter when we were walking her on the ice and with other dogs all around.

Our dog-program manager was able to use the resources from this grant to safely match Zilda with another dog, Jordie (second photo), who was also experiencing behavior issues. This match was the best we have ever seen! For months, they were able to play together daily and became the best of friends despite still not wanting to be around any other dogs. Zilda has now been adopted and there is now a silly, heart-shaped “Zilda + Jordie 4-Eva” sign hanging in the kennel to remember their friendship that developed because of our playgroup program! Jordie is still waiting for his forever home; you can meet him here.

Humane Society of Southern Wisconsin: Orvis Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

We used the funds provided to us by the Petfinder Foundation 2019 Orvis Animal Care Grant to purchase dog enrichment supplies for our in-shelter dogs. Specifically, we purchased Adaptil calming aids, several different sizes of Kong toys, various different designs of treat/kibble-dispensing rocker-ball toys, several different varieties of Jolly Ball toys, and durable Nylabone chews.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped our organization by allowing us to purchase much-needed dog enrichment supplies at a time when our budget was far more than tight. It helped the pets in our care by providing the tools we needed to give our sheltered dogs the mental and physical exercise they need.

How many pets did this grant help?

150

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

He-Man was directly helped by this grant. He was with us much longer than most dogs. Most dogs spend just about eight days with us, but He-Man spent two months — over seven times the average time a dog spends waiting to go home at our facility! Because of this extra time spent in a kennel environment, He-Man had a big need for both physical and mental exercise. The Petfinder Foundation 2019 Orvis Animal Care Grant provided us with the funds that we needed to be able to meet those needs for him. He received daily enrichment during his time with us and thus was able to remain physically and mentally well during his extended stay until he was adopted by a wonderful, loving family.

Ramapo-Bergen Animal Refuge Inc: Orvis Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

To purchase agility equipment, including: Rubber Surface Dog Agility A-Frame, 9′ Ramps 42″ Wide. 7′ Ramps 36″ Wide, Dog Agility Equipment Mini A-Frame / A Frame / AFrame, Dog Agility Hurdle Cone Set, 8 agility cones, 4 agility rods, The KLIMB Dog Training, Platform and Agility System and Octagon Hoop Jump.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Play time and agility training are led by our in-house, certified dog trainer in conjunction with the dog kennel managers. All dogs receive on-site training with our staff, and many receive off-site training as well. There is a need for all of our dogs to have regular exercise and stimulation beyond just walks and free time in one of our three fenced-in play areas. With our newly renovated, larger play yard, complete with AstroTurf, we are introducing agility training. We have purchased agility equipment with provided funding, and the dogs are learning so much and enjoying the agility experience.

How many pets did this grant help?

50 dogs a month

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Have you ever seen anything more heartwarming than rescued dogs letting go of the past and playing freely in the sunshine? Exercising their minds as they prepare for new lives? RBARI’s rescued dogs now have a brand new, safe and beautiful place to run and exercise without restrictions. It is because of your support that we can make such beautiful improvements for our four-legged friends. And, most importantly, renovations such as our new play yard, fully equipped with agility equipment, improve the quality of life for rescued dogs residing at our shelter until they find their forever homes.

Our new agility equipment allows our dogs extra play and training to help them decompress, play, train, meet potential adopters and participate in play groups and enrichment activities. Freedom, sunshine and outdoor play are so important to the well-being of our rescued dogs.

Max is a cute little Shiba Inu mix looking for the right understanding person. Agility classes and the equipment provided by a generous Petfinder Foundation grant have given Max the confidence he needed to begin to bond with new people. Not only does Max have fun, but he gets his nervous energy out and makes friends. Max gets along with most other dogs, particularly when they are exercising together. He is a sweet, loyal little dog with the people he chooses to trust. He shows the independent intelligence of a Shiba, so agility training has been key to preparing Max for a new home and de-stressing him during his stay at the shelter. A tired dog is a happy dog, and agility training have done just that for Max!

Arizona Humane Society: Orvis Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

With the $1,000 grant investment, the Arizona Humane Society (AHS) was able to purchase six bubble machines, 17 liters of bubble solution, 12 silicone lick pads, one interactive slow feeder, 10,000 pipe cleaners, two iCalmDog portable speakers, three packages of essential oils, two sound balls, seven training clickers, and 70 squeaky toys.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

AHS firmly upholds the practices of providing enrichment actives to all shelter pets at least once a day. With the support provided from the Petfinder Foundation, AHS was able to purchase $1,000 worth of canine enrichment supplies used to keep dogs happy and healthy while waiting to find their forever families! Attached are photos of enrichment activities taking place with AHS’s shelter canines. These activities would not be possible without the support of the Petfinder Foundation!

How many pets did this grant help?

AHS purchased enrichment supplies that are easily cleaned and shared among shelter animals. Thus far, the Petfinder Foundation’s grant has been able to help about 200 canines who are waiting to find their forever families! Based on the supplies that AHS was able to purchase, we foresee being able to help nearly 600 more homeless canines in the coming months with these enrichment supplies.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

As of Jan. 17, AHS is housing more than 150 canines, 88 of whom are available for adoption. Thanks to the Petfinder Foundation, AHS was able to purchase a variety of enrichment supplies that have not only kept our dogs entertained, but have also helped address various behavior challenges while they are waiting to find their forever homes. Cane (first photo), a 2-year-old American Staffordshire terrier mix, has greatly benefited from the Petfinder Foundation’s investment by learning to pace himself while eating.

Cane entered AHS’s shelter as a stray and our staff immediately noticed that he enjoyed his meals so quickly, he often made himself sick. AHS initially used a puzzle feeder to slow down his eating, but this smart boy learned to flip the tray upside down to release all the kibble, allowing for easier access and a quicker meal. With the Petfinder Foundation’s grant, AHS purchased an interactive slow feeder which requires Cane to rotate a container filled with food and drops small amounts of kibble into a puzzle feeder (featured in a social-media video). Thanks to the Petfinder Foundation, this interactive feeder had prevented Cane from eating too quickly and also provides him with mental stimulation.

Cane and one other canine featured in AHS’s enrichment video are currently available for adoption and listed on the Petfinder website.

You can meet Cane here.

You can meet his costar, Oatmeal, here.

Watch our Facebook video.

Watch our Instagram video.

Montgomery County Animal Care and Control: Orvis Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The Orvis grant was used to provide enrichment and stress-relief items for our shelter animals. We were able to provide enrichment items such as Kong treat toys and Nylabone chew rings, as well as stress- and anxiety-relief products such as Thundershirts, Feliway cat calming pheromones, and Adaptil calming diffusers for our adoption and stray-dog areas.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Many of the animals that enter our shelter are under a tremendous amount of stress, especially those animals who are here for extended periods of time. Boredom also becomes an overwhelming stressor for many of the animals in our care. By combining pet enrichment with stress-reducing products, we were able to provide items to our cat and dog areas to help reduce their boredom and stress levels. Some of greatest successes were in our cat rooms and puppy rooms. Our cat rooms were provided with a Feliway diffuser, which provided calming cat pheromones in each room. The result, observed over a period of a month, showing a vast majority of cats in our care were much more relaxed, easier to handle and were much more comfortable. This helped in increasing our cat adoption rates over the last two months due to patrons being able to handle and interact with our adoptable cats more easily.

One challenge we had faced in the past was reducing stress for our small dogs and puppies that entered our shelter. In most instances, our smaller dogs and puppies were delayed in being able to be moved up for adoption due to their heightened stress level and requiring a longer isolation period to become adjusted to the shelter environment. Upon deploying two items, an Adaptil diffuser providing calming pheromones and a Smart Love behavioral toy, we saw great progress with our smaller dogs and puppies, especially our puppies.

The Smart Love toy is a small stuffed dog that emits a constant heartbeat and heat to mimic another living creature. See our success story below! We were also able to provide various sizes of Thundershirt anti-anxiety vests for our animals that display a higher than normal stress level while here at the shelter.

How many pets did this grant help?

30

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Delvina is a chocolate Labrador puppy who entered our shelter and displayed higher than normal stress and anxiety. Delvina was difficult to handle, would constantly tremble, and became aggressive around other dogs. Delvina did not interact and would stay to the back of her kennel each day during morning cleaning. Staff had attempted several different techniques, some with slight success, but Delvina was still very timid and scared in her kennel.

Staff then requested to try the Smart Pet Love Behavior Aid toy and equipped the toy with a heating pack and activated the internal heartbeat. Upon providing this item to Delvina and rechecking her status later in the afternoon, staff were pleasantly surprised to see Delvina interacting with the toy and later had fallen asleep on top of it.

After a couple of days, staff noted a tremendous improvement in Delvina’s demeanor: She became easier to handle, and after several days, displayed no aggression towards other dogs. We were able to move her up to adoption after four days of this treatment, although she retained her plush toy, and she became a smash hit with the shelter and our patrons! You can meet her here.

Humane Society of Marion County: Orvis Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Seven XL Kuranda beds for dogs

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We are so happy to have the seven XL Kuranda beds. Our old Kuranda beds had holes in them from the dogs chewing on them and also they were not as large as the ones we purchased with this Orvis Animal Care grant. We mostly have large dogs and many are older, so these beds help them feel comfortable during their stay at our shelter and keep them elevated off the ground until forever homes can be found. The beds are durable, easy to clean, last for many years and can help many dogs. We appreciate the Orvis Animal Care Grant and the Petfinder Foundation for providing these beds.

How many pets did this grant help?

Seven and many more, as they can be reused.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Lucy (first and second photos) and Ringo (third and fourth photos) needed the new beds the most, as their beds had huge holes in them. Once the beds were assembled, Ringo and Lucy were the first in line to receive their new beds. It only took them a couple of minutes to check them out and climb on on top of them, lounging comfortably. Their former beds had huge holes in them and they would still lie on them, but they were certainly not as comfortable for them as these wonderful new beds. These new beds are larger, too, so Ringo — who is a very large senior dog at over 75 lbs. — can stretch out in comfort while waiting for his furever home. Ringo and Lucy are both senior dogs and are still awaiting furever homes. The remaining five beds go to the other pups at the shelter. These beds are amazing because they can be easily cleaned and reused for many dogs in the future.

Meet Lucy here.

Meet Ringo here.

Needy Paws Animal Shelter: Orvis Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Purchasing toys, treats, food puzzles, and other materials to develop and implement a shelter-dog enrichment program.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Without this grant, we would not have been able to allocate funds to dog enrichment. Our shelter is in a rural area and has a long length of stay, which means our animals experience a lot of stress and boredom. Our being able to give out toys, food puzzles, treat dispensers, and other fun items has helped the dogs to be happier, healthier, and more adoptable.

How many pets did this grant help?

30-40

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Fraggle came to us with a very bad case of demodex mange. His skin was so inflamed, sore, and itchy that it was difficult to pet or play with him without causing him discomfort. And Fraggle was ALL puppy, too! We did our best to work with him as he went through treatment, but it was very hard to teach him basic manners and play styles without hurting his skin. When our shipment of toys, treats and other items arrived, we were able to develop an enrichment plan that allowed Fraggle to learn to sit, refrain from jumping on people, and not play-bite people’s hands without our having to handle him in a way that made him feel pain or discomfort. As Fraggle healed and his behavior improved, he became a staff and community favorite!

Fraggle has since been adopted, and his new mom loves him very much!

Cane Rosso Rescue: Orvis Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Thank you!! We were able to use the money to purchase cameras and lights to allow our dogs to be outside more in a safe environment. In addition, we were able to install an inside bathing area.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant enables us to provide warm bathing areas during the cold months as well as for dogs who are struggling with skin infections, and are low in weight and can’t get too cold. It has been life-changing for us. In addition, we are able to allow them to be outside and play in a safe, controlled area.

How many pets did this grant help?

Ongoing

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Clifford was thrown from a car because his owners didn’t want to deal with his skin condition, which was the result of an autoimmune disease. He was in such bad shape, but we were able to give him soothing baths to help alleviate his pain, with warm water in a safe place. He is doing so well now and is adopted!

Alberta (AB) Herding Dog Rescue: Orvis Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The grant money was used to purchase Roll Over chew treats, bully sticks & twists.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The foster dogs in our care have rotating play-yard privileges (with dogs of similar size and personality) and while they wait their turn to go outside to play, we like to give them something to chew on. The act of chewing provides stress relief for these highly active and energetic dogs. It provides them an allowable outlet other than chewing or destroying things they shouldn’t.

How many pets did this grant help?

More than 30 dogs over several weeks.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

In the time that we had these chews, we had five dogs adopted (pictured from top to bottom): Chewy, Sadie, Maui, Jack and Roxy. Sadly, we have run out of the chews and still have many more dogs looking for forever homes.