Orvis Animal Care Grant

Humane Animal Treatment Society: Orvis Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Our Orvis grant that we received was used to purchase 12 brand new, durable Kuranda beds for our dog kennel, 13 replacement Kuranda bed legs, 20 martingale collars and 10 leashes for our dogs when they are taken out on volunteer walks.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant really helped our organization by replacing our most well-loved Kuranda beds that have gone through the most wear and tear. Many of the ones we currently had were chewed on the sides, had a missing leg or were just becoming difficult to clean as well as our staff would have liked. By receiving this grant, we were able to purchase brand new ones with a more-washable fabric, and the dogs have been loving them so far.

We had a lot of escape artists in our kennel at one time a few months ago. Since we send our dogs out on walks with volunteers, we need our equipment (leashes, collars, and harnesses) to be reliable and without fault. Unfortunately, flat collars can be easy for a dog to back out of and get loose from. Because of this we chose to put our escape-artist dogs on martingale collars to eliminate this issue for the safety of all.

How many pets did this grant help?

At least 30 already, and countless in the future as more dogs come into our care.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Broggy, a husky mix (first photo), was one of the many dogs who were most helped by this grant. Broggy came to us with porcupine quills in her face. After vet care, she went onto the adoption floor and was able to go on volunteer walks. From the beginning, Broggy was the master of slipping her collar. It was decided that she would go on walks in a harness, but then it took staff five minutes to put her in a harness. It was stressful for both staff and volunteers knowing that Broggy would try and slip her collar every time she went on a walk. When we purchased our first set of martingale collars, Broggy was one of the first dogs who received one. From that moment on, the staff didn’t have to worry about her slipping her collar or fussing with a complicated harness. Broggy was adopted on Oct. 30, 2018!

Reggie, a hound mix (second photo), is a staff favorite and an absolute sweetheart. He is currently at our shelter. He adores his Kuranda bed. Reggie has genetically poor back knees at 6 years old and is currently in laser therapy. He never leaves his bed, and getting a new Kuranda bed helped him stay off the solid concrete floor and support his knees. Reggie is still at our shelter and looking for his forever home. From his Petfinder profile: “I’m a laid-back guy who will let you know when I want attention and love. I can be independent and waddle around doing my own thing, but I still really would like for someone to love me unconditionally. I could possibly live in a home with other dogs if we met first and our personalities are compatible. I could live in a home with feline siblings or children.” You can meet Reggie here.

Upper Peninsula Animal Welfare Shelter: Orvis Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Dog enrichment toys to reduce boredom and give the dogs at the shelter mental and physical stimulation while they wait to be adopted.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Dogs enjoy having toys, and especially busy toys, to play with. The Boomer Balls work well for dogs who tend to destroy normal balls. The Tug-a-Jug toys have been really helpful — especially since we live in such a cold climate, and they give the dogs an indoor activity.

How many pets did this grant help?

400

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Bruno (pictured) is a dog who is with us now. He is VERY mistrusting of people. We had a great breakthrough with him with the help of the Tug-a-Jug slow-feeder busy toy. He started to know that good things happen with us! From his Petfinder profile: “Bruno is one handsome gentleman! His beautiful gold coat, big bright eyes and unique curly tail are absolutely stunning. But he’s not all looks; he also has the brains too! Bruno is very smart and quick to learn. He falls head-over-heels in love with the people he spends time with and is ready to learn and please them. Bruno falls so in love that sometimes he can be protective of the people he cares about, but with appropriate training is a wonderful companion dog. Bruno was good with other dogs in the past, but would likely prefer a home where he can be the only dog. He loves to go for walks but is just as great at being a couch potato. Bruno is a very big boy and would do best in a home that has big-dog experience.” Meet Bruno here.

Alberta (AB) Herding Dog Rescue: Orvis Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The grant for $472.72 was used to purchase RollOver chew treats such as cow hooves, tendon chews and tripe chews.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Many of the rescues are kenneled during the day until their playgroup is scheduled for outside yard time. To keep them busy and occupied while they wait, the chew treats give them something to do while they wait for their turn.

How many pets did this grant help?

30

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Not all of the pets who have benefited from the Orvis grant have been adopted yet. However, we have had at least three adoptions since receiving the grant and there are six dogs currently on their trial adoptions. The dogs still in rescue are still enjoying some of the more lasting chews (cow hooves) while they wait for their new families.

The Humane Society and Animal Rescue of Muskegon County: Orvis Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

We used the funding to purchase dog enrichment toys/puzzles in order to keep our dogs mentally and physically happy and healthy while they wait to be adopted.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The dogs in our care have a length of stay ranging from a few days to just over a year. Whether they are just arriving or are a long-stay animal, we make sure they keep their minds and bodies active. The shelter setting can be very stressful; that is why we are so thankful this grant has allowed us to buy puzzles and enrichment toys that will take our dogs’ focus off the stressful environment. Mental and physical enrichment is vital to a dog’s health while in our care, and it directly impacts their adoptability. This grant helped enrich the lives of our dogs and increased their adoptability.

How many pets did this grant help?

30+

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

This grant helped our sweet girl Smooch get adopted! She was with us for just over six months. She’s an absolutely wonderful dog; her only flaw was that she would get too excited when she came into the visiting rooms for meet-and-greets. She would come in so excited that she’d knock the potential adopters over, sometimes jumping up and head-butting them in the face. We would run her in the yard daily, take her for walks, and have her in dog playgroups, but she would just get so amped and stressed in her kennel that she always came out too hyped for the adopters’ liking. Once we received this grant, we started her on an enrichment schedule in her kennel that included different puzzles and toys multiple times a day, every day. We immediately noticed a difference in her behavior with the increased mental stimulation she was receiving along with the physical exercise she had been getting already. Smooch had a wonderful visit with a family shortly after and she MADE IT HOME JUST IN TIME FOR CHRISTMAS! Thank you for your support in making this possible.

The Humane Society of Southwest Missouri: Orvis Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

18 Kuranda beds for our shelter dogs

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Kuranda beds are the BEST! They are wonderful for old, arthritic dogs, ones who are injured and/or recovering from surgeries, and those who just love a comfy place to sleep. They’re easily cleaned and very durable, so they’re perfect for a shelter setting where the alternative is often just a concrete floor with a blanket. Prior to this grant, we only had a handful of Kuranda beds, yet thousands of dogs are in our care annually.

How many pets did this grant help?

We intake over 1,800 dogs a year and the majority are large dogs, so it could be over a thousand who benefit from and enjoy these beds during their stay with us.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Morey (first photo) came to us as a stray. He’s a senior shepherd who was thin and very arthritic. He’s gaining weight and, thanks to his new Kuranda, enjoying a more comfortable stay with us as he awaits a new family.

Lucy (second photo) came to us as a stray with a horribly injured leg. Despite our best efforts, we were unable to save it and she required amputation to be pain-free. Thanks to her new Kuranda bed, she is able to rest in comfort while she is recovering. Lucy (and her Kuranda) are in foster care right now, but she will be medically cleared for adoption and ready for her forever home soon.

Friends of Rocky Mount Animals: Orvis Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

We used the monies received to enhance the care of the animals. When the animals enter our program, they are usually in severe need of extra care.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It helps the animals so they are clean and feel much better. It helps our organization because it enables the pet to present as the well-cared-for pet they are now becoming.

How many pets did this grant help?

5

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Sandy (pictured) was a beautiful red-haired terrier/corgi mix who was between 2-3 years old. She has been adopted. We were able to clean her up and present her as her best self. The animals we rescue usually come from shelters, strays and occasionally as owner-surrenders. We are able to clean them up and medically prepare the dogs for their new lives. Thank you for your support.

Because Animals Matter: Orvis Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Interactive toys/chews
Snuffle mats that we assembled with the help of volunteers
Training/exercise aids
Sensory enrichment
Dietary support — specifically to promote weight and muscle gain and improve general food consumption on low-weight dogs we took into care
Non-medical physical care

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Our facility is relatively unique in that we allow all dogs (unless they require crate rest, are being quarantined, or are unaltered and need separate free time) indoor and outdoor free-play when our volunteers are on site. With only two shifts a day, however, that can lead to many hours kenneled. Receiving this grant award allowed for our implementation of a daily schedule where dogs have regular access to safe hard chews, interactive toys, different sensory enrichment through oil diffusion in the facility each day, and mentally stimulating meals with kibble served on/in the snuffle mats we put together.

In particular, some of the larger dogs in our care had shown toy aggression around other dogs before we implemented the project. After a more regimented routine and more physical and mental stimulation, it was as if those dogs no longer felt the need to hoard or solely possess toys.

We have found that some of our dogs have been downright too smart for a couple of the puzzle toys we got, but we can shift them to something different and more challenging as a result of having access to funding that allowed for multiple types and “levels” of toys to be purchased.

This grant also supported one of our community outreach programs by giving us access to better/safer training and exercise aids in martingale collars and shorter (and more comfortable to hold) leashes. These tools are now used by our community volunteers who visit That BAM Place to participate in our Canine Companion Club. This program allows for Club-approved dogs at our facility to go on hikes, walks, trips to the dog park, and sleepovers. We know the dogs are safer and our volunteers have had better results in controlling and training dogs on walks. Reports from Club participants since getting the new martingales and shorter leashes are that they feel the dogs are managed easily.

The grant has also saved us from extra veterinary expenses through the purchase of rubber dog “boots” for one of our puppies whom we took in with a broken leg. The break required a splint and bandage wrap and was requiring regular replacement to avoid other issues as a result of the puppy stepping in water and peeing on it. Extra splinting and wound care was no longer an issue once we purchased the boots; regular access to the outdoors was also then available without concern.

How many pets did this grant help?

27 to date

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Louie (first and second photos) is a senior Chihuahua mix who came into our care from a Southern California shelter. He was receiving no interest from the public because he just stood around, seeming lost much of the time. Once he joined us at That BAM Place, we soon learned that he had skin, eye, and kidney issues. While all of these things were manageable and treatments began, Louie still acted off and fearful of the other dogs in the facility. When it came to free-play, Louie would choose to stay in his safe space.

After making and testing just one large snuffle mat, we decided to make a smaller one for Louie. Though we just poured his kibble on top that first night, it was like he lit up. The next day it was as if a switch had gone off for him; Louie voluntarily left his kennel and joined the other dogs in the office and free-play area. It seemed clear at that point that a simple toy or act of enrichment could not only help a dog spend time safely and make for a more satisfying experience in our facility, but that it can engage the brain and even make a dog more confident.

Unfortunately, Louie’s story doesn’t have a successful adoption at the end. His kidney disease does not allow him to be put under sedation safely, and he is now in pain from a tumor that has ruptured and cannot be removed. We will be saying goodbye to him tomorrow. Louie has made tremendous strides for an old, partially deaf and blind dog in the two and a half months that he has called That BAM Place home. We feel like this is primarily a result of the enrichment tools that engaged his other senses and made the world a more inviting place.

Adopt-A-Dog, Inc: Orvis Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The Orivis Animal Care Grant covered the cost of 62 different enrichment items.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

These enrichment items help keep our dogs physically and mentally healthy during their stay with us.

How many pets did this grant help?

35

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Being in a kennel environment is unnatural for any dog, but especially for one like Harley (first photo). Harley prefers to not be around other dogs (or cats!), so the kennel is particularly stressful for her. We originally picked Harley up at a high-volume shelter in Ohio, where she had been dumped a few months earlier by a local farmer. We had Harley for a short amount of time before she was adopted to a lovely family. This family had her for several months before admitting that her behaviors were just too much for them to handle. Harley is now in our behavior-training program and ready to go to a family willing to learn all the skills she knows now. Our enrichment program is vital to keeping Harley and our other dogs happy, healthy, and busy during their stay. Meet Harley.

Friends of Michigan Animals Rescue: Orvis Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Friends of Michigan Animals Rescue (FMAR) used the money to purchase new items to use in our dog kennels for enrichment purposes. We purchased two essential-oil diffusers, a variety of oil scents, KONG toys in multiple shapes and sizes, and an assortment of rope toys and puppy chews.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped FMAR by supplying the funds needed to purchase enrichment items. Our funding is very limited and we rely heavily on donations and grants. These items could not have been purchased without the grant from the Petfinder Foundation. Our dogs have enjoyed these new items tremendously! The essential-oil diffusers help to calm and relax our dogs, while the KONGs and toys provide kennel enrichment and both physical and mental exercise.

How many pets did this grant help?

We have 14-20 dogs at any one time.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Reilly is a high-energy pup who LOVES to chew! He was chewing up every toy we could find for him, as well as his slow-feeder dish! He was also starting to chew his bed and the entryways to his kennel! One of our Kong toys was for extreme chewers, so we used multiple toys filled with yummy treats like peanut butter and yogurt. With the toys and the diffusers, which help provide a calming environment, Reilly has definitely shown improvement. He is more calm, and using his goodies to chew on instead of his living quarters. Thank you, Petfinder Foundation!! Meet him here.

Naperville Area Humane Society: Orvis Animal Care Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The grant funds were used to purchase a variety of enrichment items for our shelter dogs. One of the newest forms of enrichment that we as a shelter are doing is canine nose-work. We have wonderful volunteers, one of whom is a trainer at a nearby facility, who have donated time teaching nose-work seminars. We had the knowledge of the sport, but we were lacking the supplies to really utilize the sport in the shelter.

This grant allowed us to purchase nose-work kits and supplies so that we are now able to have shelter dogs participate in the nose-work sport. We also used some of the funding towards our new ball pits that we have in our outdoor play areas. All dogs seem to jump on board with this new enrichment area. Even the more reserved dogs all let their curiosity get the best of them and they spend copious amounts of time investigating the ball pit. A well-worth investment for the dogs — so thanks again!

Another major addition to our dog enrichment calendar included the purchase of fleece and rubber mats for snuffle mats. The material used to create these mats was purchased and then the children in our humane-education classes assemble the mats and hand them out to the shelter dogs. It is a wonderful project, and really gives the children a sense of fulfillment to see the joy the mats bring to the dogs. Lastly, the funding went to puzzle games and dog treats that are used daily and integrated in all the enrichment plans from the grant request.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant allowed our staff, volunteers, and humane-education students all to participate together to better the quality of life for our shelter dogs. We are so very fortunate to have had this grant awarded to our shelter, as it allowed us to improve daily enrichment for the shelter dogs. We work off a daily enrichment calendar that is updated regularly and provides the dogs with a variety of mental and physical stimulation. This was all made possible because of the Orvis Animal Care Grant; the funding has allowed us to improve our enrichment that we provide to the dogs. Everything purchased through this grant can be used multiple times and will continue to provide enrichment for shelter dogs for years to come.

How many pets did this grant help?

This grant will help about 300 dogs/year and about 25 dogs/month.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

This grant helped one of our longer-term residents, Jillian, who I am happy to report has been adopted. Jillian was beginning to experience kennel frustration, so it was imperative that our animal-care staff provided her with daily enrichment. In addition to walks and daily playtime, Jillian would eat each meal out of a puzzle. The puzzles were purchased with this funding as well, and continuous to help our dogs who are too smart for their own good. Jillian also loved snuffle-mat and nose-work time, two puzzle-like games that worked her brain. She also was a regular participant in the ball pit as well as a year-round Easter-egg hunt champion. We would hide plastic eggs filled with treats around the outdoor area that she would seek out and pop open. It was because of this regular enrichment that Jillian was able to remain here with a sense of stability until she found her forever home.