One Picture Saves a Life

Pima Animal Care Center: One Picture Saves a Life Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Last year, the Petfinder Foundation generously gave us a grant so that two of our most devoted volunteers could attend the One Picture Saves a Life photography workshop in Las Vegas. These volunteers brought back lifesaving photography equipment, software and skills!

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

As our community’s only open-admission animal shelter, Pima Animal Care Center takes every lost, abandoned and ailing pet who comes to our doors. They number nearly 24,000 every year, and thanks to generous support from the Petfinder Foundation, we are saving more of their lives than ever before!

Volunteer Kelly Comstock, who attended the One Picture Saves a Life workshop, manages a Facebook page that’s devoted entirely to networking our pets (http://on.fb.me/1hpfkLT). Her personality-revealing, One Picture-style pet photos have found homes for hundreds, if not thousands, of our community’s most at-risk pets. She made a video showing how much the grant helped her lifesaving work, and you can see it here: http://bit.ly/OnePictureSaves.

The One Picture training has helped folks beyond those who attended the workshop, as we are utilizing the lessons on Pima Animal Care’s official Facebook page, too (http://on.fb.me/1lFSbc5). While we are still always working to improve our intake and adoption photos, the lessons our supporters learned at the One Picture workshop have proven truly invaluable. We are incredibly grateful for your support!

How many pets did this grant help?

Hundreds have already been helped by this grant, and it will help thousands more in the months and years to come.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

PePe, a 5-year-old Chihuahua/Terrier mix (first photo), was surrendered to us when his family moved into an apartment that would not allow pets. Understandably, small PePe was frightened by shelter life, and this scared little boy was not showing well in his kennel. His initial intake picture was not flattering, too. Thankfully, our One Picture-trained volunteers were able to shoot his new photo, which showed off PePe’s personality and helped to find him a home!

A Staffordshire Terrier mix, Pinky (second photo) first came to us as small and underweight puppy in summer of 2013. After we nursed him back to health, Pinky was adopted, but unfortunately, he returned to us again as a stray in January of 2014. While his first intake photo made Pinky look frightened and unruly, his One Picture-style glamor shot showed him for the handsome and gentle gentleman he is. We are happy to report that the photo helped Pinky find a home that’s stuck!

Photo 3: After adopting this 2-year-old Australian Shepherd mix from another area shelter, Sally’s first family surrendered her to us because she was playing too rough with their other dog, who suffered from a skin condition that was being exacerbated by the rough play. Our adoption counselor volunteers report that Sally’s terrific photo helped her find a new forever family that is willing to work with her needs!

Photo 4: Cricket first came to us in 2013, when our Animal Care Officers rescued her from a family that had been neglecting her. She’d recently had puppies, and she was lactating. She was adopted, and then a month later, she was returned. Cricket finally found the right family with help from her gorgeous glamor shot. Instead of her intake photo, which was grainy and unappealing, her One Picture-style photo showed Cricket grinning ear-to-ear and helped her find a home!

Montgomery Humane Society: One Picture Saves a Life Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

To groom and bathe our adoptable dogs

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It helped get the dogs more prepared to be adopted. As we know, a clean, groomed dog show better and also feels better which encourages more people to adopt.

How many pets did this grant help?

So far 28 dogs but we are continually bathing all dogs that come up for adoption

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Max is a two year terrier mix that came into our shelter because he was no longer wanted. He had an overgrown coat, dirty and smelly. He is a very sweet boy that likes to ride in the car and very playful. He would be great with a family with kids and anyone with a small home or living in an apartment would be able to adopt him because of his size.

Chicago Cat Rescue: One Picture Saves a Life Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

To improve the pictures of our adoptables

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We learned more about grooming, photographing and marketing our adoptables with a goal of increasing adoption rates and decreasing the time from take-in to adoption.

How many pets did this grant help?

Our two workshop attendees have shared this knowledge with all volunteers so many cats now and in future.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Since attending the workshop Bobcat and Munchkin have been adopted. These boys came into Chicago Cat Rescue’s care when their elderly human companion passed. They lived with a dog and another cat. The dog was rescued by a dog only rescue group who notified us of the three cats. The boys were clearly a bonded pair and we were so happy Maggie was looking for an adult bonded pair to adopt!

Almost Home Humane Society: One Picture Saves a Life Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

We have been giving the camera to our volunteers who are interested in taking photos and videos of our adoptable animals!

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant has helped us promote our animals in more way then we could of imagined. By having more volunteers photograph our animals, they are getting to know them on a deeper level and then spreading the word to their friends. Some of our volunteers are still getting use to taking videos with the camera but those who have mastered it are showing the public how that behave outside their kennels which is very important.

How many pets did this grant help?

So far, ~25

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We have had several animals be adopted rather quickly based upon their photographs taken with the Canon Rebel. One specific kitten would be Neil (grey and white) who was adopted almost instantly due to his photo!

Santa Maria Valley Humane Society: One Picture Saves a Life Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

This is used to further our adoption program for cats and dogs.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Sending my Program Assistant to the workshop has given her added skills in photograing shelter animals in a positive and favorable manner.

How many pets did this grant help?

This grant helps the 25 dogs and 12 cats we currently have in residency, and the knowledge gained will help many more animals to come.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Patsy was an adorable, 2 1/2 year old black Chihuahua that entered our shelter in March of 2013. It’s difficult being a black Chihuahua, there are so many Chihuahuas in shelters these days. Patsy was quiet and shy and was repeatedly overlooked. We knew what a sweet little dog she was, but we weren’t sure just how to promote her so our clients could see what we saw. After being in our residence for two months we showcased her as Pet of the Week, but the photograph we used made her look sad and pitiful. With our new Canon EOS camera and the newly acquired photographic skills obtained at a recent workshop, our Program Assistant, Sandi, made it her mission to photograph Patsy in a new light. She set about snapping good quality pictures showcasing Patsy at her playful best. We discovered that Patsy loved to chase soap bubbles, but didn’t like them to touch her. It was quite fun to watch. We updated her profile photo on our website, in Petfinder, and on her kennel card. Finally, Patsy’s day came. A woman came in to look at the adoptable dogs and fell in love with little Patsy. After 5 months in our shelter, Patsy was adopted into a loving forever home.

Santa Maria Valley Humane Society: One Picture Saves a Life Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Taking better photos of our adoptable animals.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We have received increased interest in our adoptable animals since posting better-looking pictures on Facebook, Petfinder.com, Instagram and our website.

How many pets did this grant help?

It’s difficult to determine an exact number of animals helped but interest has definately increased. We have received many compliments from our Facebook followers about the more appealing photos.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Two-year-old Poodle mix Frannie (first two photos) was at our shelter since June 22. Her photo was not particularly flattering. Since retaking her picture with the One Picture methods and reposting, Frannie received interest from a family in Wisconsin and a family in Northern California, and was adopted on Sept. 4 by family who live an hour’s drive from our shelter. There is no question that the increased interest was a direct result of Frannie’s new pictures on Petfinder.com.

Brandy (fourth photo) was actually a transfer in from a rescue organization we occasionally work with in the Central Valley. She had kennel cough and some pretty bad skin issues when she first arrived, but after medical treatment she healed and perked up quite a bit. She was a resident in our kennels for less than a month before finding her perfect match, a family of four (last photo). You can see what a difference a good photo makes!

Animal Shelter Assistance Program: One Picture Saves a Life Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Two of our volunteers attended a photography workshop, received a camera and software.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The volunteers that attended the workshop really benefited from learning how to capture better photographs of the cats in our shelter. We already have some great photos as a result, which will help us with marketing adoptions!

How many pets did this grant help?

This is difficult to quantify. Our shelter takes care of approximately 1200 cats and kittens each year–and all of them get photographed!

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Our two volunteer photographers were busy the weekend of August 17-18 taking photos during our 3rd Annual Certified Pre-Owned Cat Sale (free adoption event). We adopted 43 cats and kittens that weekend and we have some great photos to use for publicity and marketing in the future.

We haven’t yet had time to utilize specific photos to achieve targeted adoptions of individual cats, however, we anticipate having some great adoption stories in the near future!

Santa Barbara County Animal Services - Santa Barbara: One Picture Saves a Life Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The product was used to take better photographs of our adoptable dogs.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It has increased traffic to our Petfinder page as well allowed us to use some of the photos taken to showcase adoptable dogs at our Re-Tail Adoption center.

How many pets did this grant help?

All of our dogs (approximately 1,000 per year)

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Trumpet is a good example of a dog this workshop has helped. She was photographed on a rainy day indoors and she was standing. After the workshop our volunteer, Rosalie, took her outside and got a much more appealing photo. This has generated a lot more interest in her and we feel she will be adopted much easier with the current photo.

Woods Humane Society: One Picture Saves a Life Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

We had the ability to send our shelter’s photography volunteers to a day training workshop in Santa Maria. Our photos are already taking a HUGE leap forward!

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Our photos are already taking a HUGE leap forward! We are also seeing more communication via our social media outlets when posting photos of our adoptable animals.

How many pets did this grant help?

1200 annually = every animal that is placed up for adoption at our facility

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

This grant has helped all of our adoptable animals! I can not narrow it down to one or two individuals. The program enhanced our ability to promote and showcase the wonderful dogs and cats who are desperately seeking loving homes at Woods Humane Society, San Luis Obispo, CA.

Dog Adoption and Welfare Group: One Picture Saves a Life Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

This grant provided us with invaluable experience interacting with professional photographer Seth Casteel and learning to take positive photos with professional equipment.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Marketing is always a challenge to get dogs out of our doors and into fabulous homes. This experience and equipment is allowing us to shed new positive light on not only our own shelter dogs, but the shelter dog as an institution. The positive photos are able to draw more members of the public into shelters where they are typically afraid. By providing a positive image of the shelter dog, more dogs are getting adopted into homes.

How many pets did this grant help?

Immeasurable! At least 7 so far, but likely hundreds we didn’t even know about.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Chalkie, an 8 month old west highland terrier mix was shy and withdrawn in the shelter, and was scared of the camera and was photographed without looking at the camera. With training from this program, as well as the equipment, our volunteer learned to get closer to the animal in order to reduce stress and take a beautiful photo focusing on his facial features. He was recently adopted by a family who was attracted to his photo “because of his beautiful and soulful eyes” which otherwise would not have been captured.