Purina New Year, New Home

Heartland Animal Shelter: Purina New Year, New Home Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The grant funds were used to waive adoption fees for senior animals (age 8+) adopted by senior citizens (age 65+).

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant allowed us to place special focus on our senior animals and help get them adopted. When senior adopters visited us, we encouraged them to meet some of our older cats and dogs who were in need of loving homes, and in most cases, these adopters found their match in a senior pet! Waiving the adoption fee as part of our Seniors for Seniors program not only brought more visitors into the shelter, but helped a number of seniors adopt our deserving senior cats and dogs who are often overlooked.

This program was an overwhelming success and we ran out of grant funds before the end of the grant period. Thanks to this grant award, we have found support in the community to help us continue this Seniors for Seniors promotion even longer. We hope to make this a permanent adoption program in the future.

Thank you, Petfinder Foundation and Nestle Purina!

How many pets did this grant help?

17

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Sparkles, a 10-year-old miniature poodle mix (first photo), came to us as a rescue from Chicago Animal Care and Control. Her mouth was in severe pain and, after seeing multiple specialists to determine the cause, it was discovered that she had lymphoma. However, her senior adopters met her and fell in love and decided they would give her the best life possible with the time she had remaining. Now, following surgery and with supportive care, Sparkles is still going strong and is happy, pain-free and loving life!

Fayette Humane Society: Purina New Year, New Home Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Fayette Humane Society used the 2019 Nestle Purina New Year, New Home Pet Adoption Grant from the Petfinder Foundation to offer discounted and waived adoption fees for felines. The grant subsidized adoption fees for 16 bonded kitten pairs (and one trio!), as well as reduced fees for seven singles, including older kittens and cats who had been with Fayette Humane Society for a long time and were being overlooked. We were able to waive adoption fees entirely in three cases, with another waived fee pending for a special-needs cat who is on trial with a potential adopter. There are additionally two more pending bonded pairs for whom Fayette Humane Society is offering reduced adoption fees. In total, Fayette Humane Society will have been able to adopt out 28 kittens/cats at reduced costs to adopters thanks to this grant.

While the reduced fees are enticing to potential adopters, families must of course still fill out an application and agree to comply with all aspects of the adoption contract, which helps assure that discounted/free pets are not impulsive decisions. Once a family has been approved to adopt, the discounted fee allows them to save money for future vet visits and/or toys and treats to spoil their new pet!

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The 2019 Nestle Purina New Year, New Home Pet Adoption Grant from the Petfinder Foundation helped both Fayette Humane Society and the pets in its care. We always encourage potential adopters to consider getting two kittens at the same time for a variety of reasons. Not only is it healthier for the kittens to have a constant playmate to keep them physically active and emotionally stimulated, but kittens keep each other occupied, which prevents boredom and, consequently, behavioral issues that often result in animals getting returned.

The grant also helped some of our older kittens and cats who had been with us for a while find their forever families. While they are, of course, loved by their foster families, they deserved their own homes where they could thrive as a cherished member of the family.

This also helped the overall morale of the organization, as volunteers were encouraged to see these adoptions and felt reinvigorated by the happy endings. The morale boost helps us continue our mission to save new kittens who come to take the places of those who were adopted.

How many pets did this grant help?

28

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Wilbur and Templeton (first photo, middle row) were originally with Fayette Humane Society as newborns. A foster volunteer bottle-fed and raised them until they were adopted in January. Unfortunately, the adoptive family’s circumstances changed soon after that when their new owner took a job overseas and would not be able to bring the boys with her. She surrendered Wilbur and Templeton in March, and there was not a dry eye in the house. She was devastated to not be able to keep them, and the volunteers were distraught at seeing the brothers confused and stressed by the upheaval. Because of this grant, Fayette Humane Society was able to offer bonded pairs a discounted adoption fee, and it did not take long until a new family fell in love with their sweet demeanor and beautiful coloring and quickly made the decision to adopt Wilbur and Templeton together!

Animal Rescue of the Rockies: Purina New Year, New Home Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

To cover adoption fees for some of our harder-to-adopt pets.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped to encourage adopters to consider some of our older adoptable pets and those with medical or behavioral issues.

How many pets did this grant help?

Six so far, with another 10 pets still waiting for forever homes.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Ringo is a 4-year-old black-and-white tuxedo cat who was found as a stray in a Denver, Colorado, neighborhood with a severely injured and infected front paw. Jenni Leigh, an experienced Animal Rescue of the Rockies cat foster (first photo), took him into her home. Multiple veterinary visits determined that Ringo’s paw and leg couldn’t be saved, so he underwent amputation surgery. Ringo’s behavior had been unpredictable from the day he was rescued, and although he could be the most sweet and loving cat, sometimes he unexpectedly turned into a biting, scratching little monster. Jenni was bitten and scratched by him enough to need medical attention on more than one occasion, but she didn’t give up on him. She took him to an animal behaviorist, who prescribed anti-anxiety medication for him, which he takes on a daily basis. Ringo spent more than two years in his foster home before he was finally adopted on April 29, 2019, thanks to the Purina New Year, New Home grant that covered his adoption fee. His new mom, Joan (second photo), just adores him, and so far he has been very well-behaved and seems to be thriving in his new forever home.

Barren River Animal Welfare Association (BRAWA): Purina New Year, New Home Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Since receiving the grant funds in March 2019, BRAWA was able to reduce adoption fees on hard-to-place dogs including special breeds such as pit bulls, disabled and senior dogs, black dogs, large dogs, and those with behavioral issues. In most cases, regular adoption fees were reduced by 50%. Signage was placed on select dogs saying “The Petfinder Foundation is Helping Me Find a Home.”

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

BRAWA operates completely on grants, donations, fundraisers, and revenue generated from adoption fees. The grant funds help offset the revenue that we lost due to the reduced adoption fees.

How many pets did this grant help?

To date, the grant has benefited 27 dogs.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Stumpy (first photo) is a 7-year-old pit bull mix weighing 70 lbs. and with three legs. For these reasons, he was often overlooked at the shelter, and the staff at BRAWA knew it would take a special family to provide the support and care he needed. He was originally adopted from BRAWA in 2017; however, he was returned to the shelter in March 2019 as a stray and his previous owner did not reclaim him. He was adopted within a week on March 23, 2019, by a family with another pit bull. They immediately fell in love with Stumpy and he was very happy to get his new family (second photo).

Barbary (third photo) is typical of the many pit bulls and similar breeds taken in at BRAWA. He came to us a stray by way of Animal Control. When he first arrived, he showed signs of neglect, had fighting scars and skin issues, and was in poor condition. He received extensive medical treatment and was at the shelter for more than two months before being adopted by a wonderful new family. His fee was reduced as a result of the Petfinder Foundation grant. He was adopted on May 17, 2019.

As you can see from the fourth photo, Cierra is very happy with her new family. A pit bull mix, she was overlooked for weeks at the shelter. She was adopted at a special off-site adoption day and her fee was reduced thanks to the Petfinder Foundation Grant. She went home with a great family — and a big smile — on May 19, 2019.

Rubble (fifth photo) is another disabled dog who benefited from the Petfinder Foundation grant. He is a boxer/shepherd mix with three legs. He was originally adopted from our shelter in 2018; however, he was returned in April 2019 due to the adopter’s personal issues. He was adopted on May 11, 2019. We also placed several other dogs with vision/hearing issues.

Yogi (sixth photo) is a large Mastiff/Boxer mix. He was an owner-surrender due to the owner’s health issues. Yogi was scared and confused about why he was at the shelter and because of his large size, he was often passed by for adoption. He was at the shelter for over a month and was adopted and benefited from the reduced adoption fee adopted on April 20, 2019.

LARAS House (Limestone Animal Rescue and Adoption Shelter): Purina New Year, New Home Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Of the $2,000 original grant to LARAS House, we have so far been able to reduce the adoption fees of 21 cats and eight dogs by $40 each, coming to $1,160 towards the get-ready fees for those pets adopted. This has truly been amazing! We are so excited that so many cats over 1 year old have been adopted — so often, they languish at the shelter since so many adopters want kittens.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant has allowed us to encourage and subsidize the adoption of often-overlooked pets. It helped us care for even more animals since the costs associated with these pets have been subsidized.

How many pets did this grant help?

29 pets were adopted with this grant (21 cats and eight dogs) in the first two months of implementation.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

There were so many great stories involved with the pets adopted thanks to this grant. The one that may have been most special was the adoption of Army (who had been at the shelter for over a year) and Tiger. They are sweet cats whom we loved and we were so excited that they could be adopted together (first photo). Another story was Dutchess (second photo), a special kitty who needed extra love — and this grant help make it happen! Thank you so much!

PawPrints Animal Rescue: Purina New Year, New Home Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The grant was used to reduce the adoption fees of some of our harder-to-adopt animals: seniors, adult cats, bonded pairs and those who could have long-term medical needs and those who had been in our care for a very long time.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Because of the ability to reduce our adoption fees, five animals in our care have found their forever homes!

How many pets did this grant help?

5

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

When you take in a senior, blind, deaf, sick dog, there is a real chance he may never find his forever home, but that’s okay with us at PawPrints. We are willing to wait as long as it takes — or even forever, if that’s how things are meant to be. Senior dogs are hard enough to find homes for, but when they have all the other issues Gilbert has, it can seem like an impossible feat. All of this did not sway his foster mom from saying, “I want to foster this old man; I want to help make him well and feel loved again.” And that’s exactly what his foster mom did. These before and after pictures can attest to that.

Gilbert is completely and utterly devoted to his foster mom. He follows her from room to room; he waits for her if she leaves the house, standing at the door just waiting for her to return. Gilbert and his foster mom have a very special bond. It could be because Gilbert is just so grateful for the love and kindness she has shown him all these months, maybe the first love and kindness he’s received in a very long time or even forever.

So when we can say that Gilbert has been in his forever home all along, with the person whom his entire world revolves around, it is the absolute best feeling in the world! Our very special old man Gilbert is going to spend the rest of his life with his foster mom — Gilbert is officially adopted!
Happy adoption, Gilbert. You are forever where you were meant to be all along 💕

Peaches Bully Rescue: Purina New Year, New Home Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

We reduced adoption fees for senior pets who are usually overlooked in our bully-breed rescue.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant allowed our rescue to offer families who are open to senior and special-needs dogs the ability to adopt a dog in need and not pay the normal adoption fee. Our goal was to take in four bully-breed dogs who needed medical attention and surgeries and place them into their forever homes with families. The adoption fee that would have been charged was covered by the grant and the family was committed to maintaining the healthcare needs of the dog.

How many pets did this grant help?

4

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We were able to help four bully-breed dogs: Zackary, Freya, Dusty, and Oswald. Zackary (first photo) is a 10-year-old French bulldog who spent his life as a breeder stud dog living all over the U.S.A. His advanced age and his breed characteristics came with a list of medical concerns. Zackary was not potty-trained, didn’t know what toys were, had an eye ulcer and limited mobility in his legs and had not eaten from a bowl before. After two months of surgeries and recoveries, Zackary was able to start meeting families. People would completely dismiss his sweet self at events or meetings simply because of his age and potential future medical needs — until he met his new pawrents! They instantly fell in love and have never looked back. The grant allowed the family to redirect the adoption fee (which was now covered) towards his medical needs and outfitting their house with a ramp. This sweet boy even has convinced his new pawrents that they should foster with us. They have successfully fostered three dogs for our rescue. What a great story — all because of a grant.

Freya (second photo) was found as a stray, dumped on the side of the road. Estimated to be 12 to 13 years old, this sweet bulldog was dehydrated, bleeding, and greatly confused. After Freya spent a few days getting better at the vet, a previous adopter stepped up and not only fostered her but gave her the forever family we always wanted for her. By utilizing the grant money for the adoption fee, the family was able to use those funds to care for this sweet girl. She is happy with her three sisters and one fur brother and living her best self.

Dusty (third photo) was a very sick puppy whom we took in to give him the best medical care possible. After weeks of treatment for hookworm, coccidia, and an infection, Dusty had found himself in a good place and ready for adoption. Unfortunately, he took a turn for the worse a few days after he and his brother (pictured with him) met their future family. The rescue did everything possible and after Dusty spent six days in the ICU, we lost his fight. The family was devastated, as was the rescue staff who spent nights sitting with him at the incubator. Grant money allowed us to offer a reduced adoption fee to the family and cover some of the medical bills for Dusty. Rest in peace, sweet boy! Your brother is being well cared-for by a grateful family. You will always be in our heart.

Oswald came to us as a heartworm-positive bulldog who needed a new start in life. He had a family who wanted to love him forever but couldn’t afford the treatment and the adoption fee. Grant money allowed us to reduce their adoption fee and get him all the treatments he needed! He is now heartworm-negative and couldn’t be a happier boy.

Indiana County Humane Society: Purina New Year, New Home Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

We use our grant to provide free adoptions for spayed and neutered cats.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We were able to focus adoptions on cats who were older and were also spayed or neutered. Our organization, like most rescues, is able to quickly adopt kittens, but adult cats are harder to place. This grant allowed us to promote adult cats so they could get good homes, even during kitten season when lots of kittens were available.

How many pets did this grant help?

34

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Here is Debra Stiles’s story of her adopted cat Jeep: “I found Jeep online on Petfinder.com in January 2019 after the loss of my 18-year-old Maine Coon. I instantly fell in love with his sweet face and kind eyes. I came into the shelter in the beginning of March with my daughter and grandson and sat with Jeep in a private “get to know the pet” room. He was a little scared, but I understood. I made a promise to myself that after Easter, if Jeep was still available, I would love to rescue him!!”

Jeep was lucky — Debra came in and adopted him one week after Easter and was able to get him with no adoption fee thanks to the Purina New Year, New Home free-adoption grant.

Berkeley-East Bay Humane Society: Purina New Year, New Home Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Sponsoring adoption fees for adult and senior cats.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Because of the New Year, New Home grant, we were able to place 27 adult and senior cats into loving homes in the month of April. By being able to fully subsidize our adult and senior cats’ adoption fees, we sent nearly 60% more adult and senior cats home versus the same time last year. With kitten season in full swing, this provided much-needed space to accommodate cats who need to find loving homes.

Berkeley Humane’s model focused on where we can have the most impact: medically needy animals who are most often at highest risk for euthanasia. These are the hardest-luck animals who, without us, might not have a chance. In fact, most of the animals we rescued last year needed and received extensive medical care before adoption. The New Year, New Home Pet Adoption Grant enabled us to find homes for needy animals who likely would have been passed over in a traditional setting.

How many pets did this grant help?

27

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Norma (first photo) is a sweet older girl who came into our care in the middle of February. She is a very gorgeous girl, with long diluted calico fur and big sparkly eyes — definitely a face that caught people’s eyes! We were excited to transfer her in and knew she had high potential to find a home early on. Yet as can be the case with older animals, her outwardly healthy appearance did not accurately depict what was actually going on inside. Norma needed a little extra attention: We had to address her oddly positioned liver. So she received an ultrasound, which showed her slightly herniated liver, and her heart, which had been pushed over to make room — an occurrence that sounds scary, but thankfully nothing we needed to address with an invasive procedure. We also did a dental on her that resulted in several teeth extractions and treated her for infected nail beds. It took a little bit to get her in tip-top shape, but once we did, she was ready to meet her person!

We learned quickly that Norma was not an extrovert and preferred to not be the center of attention. During her first few weeks, she kept to her cubby space or curled up tight on her bed, getting upset when too many hands were on her. So we decided to secure her cage and put up a friendly sign asking for interested adopters to come find a staff member for introductions. This made Norma so much happier! The less she felt like she was on display, the more she was open to meeting people. In the end, an older woman who had previously had a cat much like Norma took her home. She handled Norma beautifully and understood to admire her from afar until Norma came to her, which Norma did very quickly. Norma is now living in San Francisco, enjoying the views of the city from up high.

When we have two bonded cats, it is our mission to get them adopted together. With Chipmunk and Possum (second photo), we had the challenge of them being bonded cats, black cats and shy cats. We gave them a two-tiered condo with plenty of space to go wherever they felt the safest. For the first few days, they remained wedged together in one cubby space. Open to light petting, they began to enjoy brief moments of affection from the staff, a really hopeful sign! They were still fairly shy by adoption day, but had come far enough that we did not want them to miss out on any opportunities to find the perfect home. That Friday, they were visited by a few people, every now and then when they would come out to get a drink of water or glance through the window to see what all of us were doing up front. Every little moment of engagement with us was positive progression, so we were very hopeful! We may have been hopeful, but we weren’t expecting what came next. Chipmunk and Possum found a home the very next day! A wonderful couple who had lost their bonded pair last year had been on the search for the right duo and they found it in these two. We always love when the “undercat” wins!

Beagle Freedom Project: Purina New Year, New Home Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Reduced adoption fees for rescued animals in need

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant has helped to significantly increase our recent adoptions through a reduction of our standard adoption fee for dogs and cats. In total, our goal is to help 20 former victims of animal cruelty with the funds awarded to find loving, forever homes for our rescues. So far we have we applied the grant towards seven deserving animal survivors — Ringo, Bennie, Trooper, Rae, Rufus, Tia, and Scout — who were all rescued from animal testing, abandonment, high[-intake] shelters and/or the dog-meat trade.

How many pets did this grant help?

Currently seven, with the aim to help 20 animals in need total

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Rufus (first photo) was rescued from animal testing, where he spent the first year and a half of his life in a U.S. laboratory. Since Rufus was a larger hound, it took a little while for him to be adopted. However, with a little patience, we found Rufus the perfect home — and it could not be a more of a beautiful fit. Rufus lives with another female hound who has taken him under her wing. They snuggle, walk, and play together. Honestly, they never want to be separate!

Scout (second photo) was rescued from a lab, where he was used for testing for the first year of his life. Scout was adopted by a family with two young daughters, and since he is the only dog, he loves getting all the attention and pets. Scout now enjoys his days playing outside, going for long walks, socializing with other dogs in the neighborhood, and occasionally barking at the squirrels outside on the lawn. His favorite activity is to go long hikes with his new family in the forests surrounding his new home and getting pampered with love as the only hound dog.

Rae (third photo) was rescued from the South Korean meat trade. She went to a foster home right away that fell in love with her and immediately wanted to keep her forever. Rae now has another Dachshund sibling whom she loves very much. She has adjusted to home life amazingly well after all the trauma she has endured. Rae has really warmed up to people and learned to trust humans again. She was so fearful and shy of people when we first rescued her. Now, she allows pretty much anyone hold her!

Bennie (fourth photo) was rescued nearly one year ago from the streets of China. He was unable to use his hind legs, incontinent, and unable to hold himself up or walk. We knew it would take a highly dedicated, experienced, and committed adopter to open their home to Bennie. Bennie found his forever home just last month. An incredible family in Wisconsin who design, create, and build wheels for paraplegic dogs adopted Bennie, giving him everything he needs to thrive. We knew it was a match made in heaven, as Bennie’s new family previously had a paraplegic black Lab named Gunnar who was almost the spitting image of Bennie. They had named their company Gunnar’s Wheels. We are so absolutely thrilled for Bennie, as we know he is the best and most loving, capable home now!

Ringo (fifth photo) is an animal-testing and shelter survivor. He lives in Austin, Texas, with his family, who live right next to a dog park. So now one of Ringo’s favorite activities is to play at the park with the local neighbor pups. He is very curious about squirrels and acts playful around them. He is really thriving in his new home and his adopter, Sam, absolutely adores him. Not to mention he’s an only dog so he is spoiled -– and he deserves it!

Trooper (sixth photo) was rescued from South Korea. She was found on her own in a broken plywood shed. Although her story is pretty uncertain, she was at high risk of being butchered for the dog-meat trade. Luckily, we were able to rescue her and transport Trooper to the U.S., where she was adopted by a couple who live near the beach. Now, she is living her absolute best life! She continues to grow, as she is still a puppy, and her adopters say she is a total character. She has her own way of doing things and she is very stubborn when it comes to her training. But she is learning. Trooper definitely loves being the only dog and getting her way -– well, most of the time!

Tequila, nicknamed Tia (seventh photo), has settled right into her home like the princess that she is! Tia was rescued from animal testing after being sold to the lab by Class B traders from a shelter in Mexico. It wasn’t long before Tia was in foster home and her family adopted her. She is currently learning new commands quickly (the treats definitely help!) and never leaves her mom’s side.