Purina New Year, New Home

Shelter From the Storm: Purina New Year, New Home Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

This grant money was used to provide reduced adoption fees.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We were able to reduce the adoption fees for 19 dogs in our care to help them find homes quicker.

How many pets did this grant help?

19

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

When Pumpkin Spice (first photo) came to our rescue from one of the animal-control facilities we work with, she had a very large inguinal hernia. During surgery, we found her spleen to be entrapped in the hernia as well as her small bowel. During the first surgery, we had to remove her spleen and repair the hernia defect. Unfortunately, she had to have three more surgical procedures and lots of wound-management before everything was healed and she was able to go up for adoption. After many months of care, she was finally able to go up for adoption. She is an easy, fun-loving, sweet girl — unless there are cats around, and in that case, she likes to be naughty. Pumpkin Spice may be a little bit older, but she has plenty of spunk and is sure to bring a smile to your face. She has been adopted.

Here Today Adopted Tomorrow Animal Sanctuary, Inc.: Purina New Year, New Home Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The grant money was used to reduce adoption fees for spirit cats (shy/fearful cats) and chronically ill cats and help pay their medical bills before and after adoption (our Care for Life Program).

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Since becoming open-admission in 2018, Here Today Adopted Tomorrow (HTAT) has been taking in more cats that are traditionally seen as hard to adopt. The Purina New Year, New Home grant has helped us remove the barrier of price from adoption. When combined with HTAT’s innovative adoption programming for special-needs cats, we have been able to find furever homes for cats whom we would have been unable to help before, including shy/fearful cats and chronically ill cats, making it possible for HTAT to remain open-admission and no-kill to more effectively serve our community.

How many pets did this grant help?

To date, nine cats have been adopted and seven are currently on the adoption floor because of funds from this grant.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

George (first photo) is a tuxedo cat who came in when his owner passed away. He had just been diagnosed as a diabetic. He would sometimes get a bit cranky with the other cats, but once his blood sugar was under control, he became a new cat. He is 10 years old but plays like a kitten. He loves children, almost more than adults. Catherine and her fiancé walked in one day and fell in love with him. Catherine is a home health aide, so giving George his insulin shots was no big deal to her. The cost of his care, on the other hand, was daunting. Thanks to the Purina New Year, New Home grant, George is in our Care for Life program and HTAT is helping to pay for his medical care. Now George lives with Catherine and her family and has a little girl (Catherine’s daughter) to call his own.

Mr. Bigglesworth (second photo) came to HTAT at 5 years old as a timid cat after living his life outside. He had an upper-respiratory infection and a mouth infection and needed a dental. Chou Chou (third photo) was a shy kitten who wanted nothing more than to sit in a warm lap. Mr. Bigglesworth and Chou Chou are both tuxedo cats, so it was often assumed that they were related. However, they were just two stray cats from two different towns who happened to arrive at HTAT at about the same time. Both cats have feline leukemia (FeLV).

In most shelters, cats with FeLV don’t get a chance. They are simply euthanized, regardless of whether they are currently healthy or not. At Here Today, we believe that every cat deserves a chance, and we have a special room just for FeLV+ cats because FeLV is easily transmitted between cats. Thanks to the Purina New Year, New Home grant, we were able to get Mr. Bigglesworth and Chou Chou the medical care and testing they needed to be ready for adoption. The reduced adoption fee and the Care for Life program help nudge adopters who may be hesitant to adopt our FeLV+ cats.

Barbara and her daughter already had an FeLV+ cat named Clown at home and wanted some friends for her. They were excited to adopt BOTH Mr. Biggleswoth and Chou Chou. Both cats are doing well in their new home. Mr. Bigglesworth is enjoying more human interaction and Chou Chou is acting like a real kitten. See the picture of her cuddling with her new friend Clown (fourth photo).

Also included are photos of a few cats currently up for adoption thanks to the Purina New Year, New Home grant:

Chai (fifth photo): Diabetic, Care for Life Meet Chai here.

Addie (sixth photo): Tail-pull Injury, Care for Life Meet Addie here.

July (sixth photo): Spirit Cat Meet July here.

Clarissa (seventh photo): Spirit Cat Meet Clarissa here.

Franklin County Humane Society DBA Paws for Life NC: Purina New Year, New Home Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The grant of $1,500 was used to reduce the adoption fees of cats aged 1 year and older from $95 to $40. It was also used to reduce the adoption fees of dogs who have been up for adoption for a long time (six months to more than a year) from $225 to $100.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant was essential in marketing cats and dogs who had been with us a while. It provided a new way to highlight the pets on social media, as well as in their biographies on our website and on Petfinder. Although the reduction in fees was not the only reason people adopted, it was an added incentive to meet pets who had been overlooked. Several of the pets adopted through this grant had been with Paws for Life NC for over a year. The adoptions freed up space in foster homes, allowing us to help more pets. The grant was also a morale boost to our volunteers and generated excitement by helping more animals find homes. We are incredibly thankful for Purina and the Petfinder Foundation’s generous grant, which helped 19 pets find forever homes and helped 15 shelter animals move from an overcrowded county shelter into foster care.

How many pets did this grant help?

19

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Gunther is a sweet, petite, friendly dog with silly ears. In February 2018, he was pulled by Paws for Life NC from the Franklin County shelter. The Franklin County shelter is an open-intake shelter and Gunther’s time was nearly up. Luckily, we had someone to foster Gunther and he moved into a foster home. Sadly, he was found to be heartworm-positive. After spending some time getting healthy and putting on a little weight in foster care, he was neutered and treated for heartworm. In March 2018, he went up for adoption, and for over a year, Gunther was overlooked.

His foster mom took great pictures, wrote an excellent bio, and took him to community events and adoption events. She shared his photo and story on Facebook, but no one was interested. Gunther also has a wonderful personality — the spunky little guy, at just 50 lbs., likes to play but seems to have a good read on the dogs around him. If he’s with a playful pup, he will tumble and play; if he’s with an older, reserved dog, he will relax with them. He is eager to please, and loves affection and learning what it is to be a warm and cozy indoor doggie. We just had no idea why he was not finding a home.

Shortly after we reduced Gunther’s fee thanks to the grant, he received an application. The home trial was successful, and after 14 months and five days in foster care, he has found his forever! His dad says, “We can’t imagine life without him. He has done so well at our house! He has two kitty brothers, Russel (he’s 22) and Sam, and they all tolerate each other.” It was a tearful day for his foster mom, but she was so happy to see him happy.

Gunther’s foster mom says, “Thank you, Petfinder Foundation, for this wonderful grant! My foster pup Gunther (Gunny) is on home trial and the discounted adoption fee was one of the reasons they chose him — not because they can’t afford the fee, but they want to spoil him with extra toys and treats and a fancy new bed. The other reason was the video of Gunny and my cat playing sweetly together. The adopters have a 20-year-old kitty and they needed a dog who was very cat-friendly!”

Montgomery County Animal Care and Control: Purina New Year, New Home Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Nestle Purina’s New Year New Home grant was to provide reduced-fee and fee-waived adoptions to members of the community.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The Nestle Purina New Year New Home grant provided Montgomery County Animal Care and Control with the means to find 22 dogs and cats new homes through fee-reduced and fee-waived adoptions. Many in our community have wanted to adopt but, due to cost, sometimes responsible pet owners have been unable to adopt, and the Nestle Purina Grant opened those doors to members of our community. Being a large military community, we also provided alternatives to our military Gold Star families by providing fee-waived adoptions to those tremendously brave families. We also provided fee-waived adoptions to our combat-wounded warriors and reduced-fee adoptions to all active-duty military members. Many of these animals found forever homes thanks to the tremendous generosity of Nestle Purina and the Petfinder Foundation.

How many pets did this grant help?

22

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Our great story begins with Ginger. Ginger came to us as an unwanted puppy from her previous owner, who was just unable to care for Ginger any longer due to an unexpected move to a smaller apartment. Ginger required a great deal of exercise and attention, being a husky mix, and it was just unfair to allow her to be cramped in a small apartment all day long. Ginger struggled here at the shelter, as many pets do when they are separated from their owners. Ginger had begun to show signs of depression from not being able to run or have a great deal of human interaction as she was accustomed to. Enter the Larusch family. The family came to the shelter one day looking for an energetic younger dog who could be active with their 13-year-old daughter. They spent a great deal of time with Ginger and found an immediate connection. Their daughter loved to be outside playing and being active. They immediately fell in love and were excited to be able to take Ginger home. Ginger has spent the last few weeks running free in the family’s fenced-in yard, and going on long walks with the family and field trips to the park. We are so grateful that Ginger found her forever home.

Charlie's Angels Animal Rescue: Purina New Year, New Home Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

We spent the grant money on rehoming three pairs of bonded senior dogs: Cap and Perseus, Colby and Aires, and Buddy and Copper. We were able to waive the adoption fee on one of the dogs in each pair. Buddy needed heartworm treatment. Colby and Aires both required extensive treatment because one is blind and had an eye infection and both had extensive skin problems.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We were able to provide all the necessary medical treatments and were able to help the adopters afford to adopt the pairs.

How many pets did this grant help?

6

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Cap and Perseus (first photo) were both scheduled for euthanasia. They were deemed to be unadoptable because they were both so terrified of people, especially men. Our volunteer tasked with pulling dogs from the county shelter felt like both could be saved with proper care. She pulled Cap and placed him with a volunteer foster home, where he almost immediately overcame his fears. Because of that success, she then pulled Perseus and placed him with the same foster family. After a while, he began to bond with Cap, to the point where they could be walked, as long as they were together. Cap became so attached to his foster parents he would not interact with potential adopters, so the fosters adopted him. We waived the adoption fee on Perseus so he could remain with Cap.

Humane Society of the Ohio Valley: Purina New Year, New Home Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

This grant money was used to offset adoption fees during the months of April and May.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant allowed us to lower our adoption fees, which enticed potential adopters to visit the shelter. Once at the shelter, many folks fell in love with and adopted their new best friends. This allowed HSOV to clear several kennels and open them up for other animals who needed temporary housing.

How many pets did this grant help?

During April, 44 dogs and 26 cats were adopted. During May, 35 dogs and 32 cats were adopted.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Baine was a 4-year-old male boxer/pit bull mix who was surrendered by his owner on June 7, 2018. Although Baine was good with kids, housebroken and crate-trained, he got overlooked by potential adopters. In October of 2018, Baine was adopted. However, he proved not to be a good fit for the family and was returned. Volunteers gave him extra attention upon his return, but he seemed to be depressed and confused by what he had experienced. Baine was adopted again in November 2018 and was once again returned. His disposition turned to one of despair as he waited for his forever home. Finally, in April 2019, Baine hit the jackpot and was adopted by a family that loves and spoils him.

Heartland Animal Shelter: Purina New Year, New Home Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The grant funds were used to waive adoption fees for senior animals (age 8+) adopted by senior citizens (age 65+).

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant allowed us to place special focus on our senior animals and help get them adopted. When senior adopters visited us, we encouraged them to meet some of our older cats and dogs who were in need of loving homes, and in most cases, these adopters found their match in a senior pet! Waiving the adoption fee as part of our Seniors for Seniors program not only brought more visitors into the shelter, but helped a number of seniors adopt our deserving senior cats and dogs who are often overlooked.

This program was an overwhelming success and we ran out of grant funds before the end of the grant period. Thanks to this grant award, we have found support in the community to help us continue this Seniors for Seniors promotion even longer. We hope to make this a permanent adoption program in the future.

Thank you, Petfinder Foundation and Nestle Purina!

How many pets did this grant help?

17

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Sparkles, a 10-year-old miniature poodle mix (first photo), came to us as a rescue from Chicago Animal Care and Control. Her mouth was in severe pain and, after seeing multiple specialists to determine the cause, it was discovered that she had lymphoma. However, her senior adopters met her and fell in love and decided they would give her the best life possible with the time she had remaining. Now, following surgery and with supportive care, Sparkles is still going strong and is happy, pain-free and loving life!

Fayette Humane Society: Purina New Year, New Home Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Fayette Humane Society used the 2019 Nestle Purina New Year, New Home Pet Adoption Grant from the Petfinder Foundation to offer discounted and waived adoption fees for felines. The grant subsidized adoption fees for 16 bonded kitten pairs (and one trio!), as well as reduced fees for seven singles, including older kittens and cats who had been with Fayette Humane Society for a long time and were being overlooked. We were able to waive adoption fees entirely in three cases, with another waived fee pending for a special-needs cat who is on trial with a potential adopter. There are additionally two more pending bonded pairs for whom Fayette Humane Society is offering reduced adoption fees. In total, Fayette Humane Society will have been able to adopt out 28 kittens/cats at reduced costs to adopters thanks to this grant.

While the reduced fees are enticing to potential adopters, families must of course still fill out an application and agree to comply with all aspects of the adoption contract, which helps assure that discounted/free pets are not impulsive decisions. Once a family has been approved to adopt, the discounted fee allows them to save money for future vet visits and/or toys and treats to spoil their new pet!

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The 2019 Nestle Purina New Year, New Home Pet Adoption Grant from the Petfinder Foundation helped both Fayette Humane Society and the pets in its care. We always encourage potential adopters to consider getting two kittens at the same time for a variety of reasons. Not only is it healthier for the kittens to have a constant playmate to keep them physically active and emotionally stimulated, but kittens keep each other occupied, which prevents boredom and, consequently, behavioral issues that often result in animals getting returned.

The grant also helped some of our older kittens and cats who had been with us for a while find their forever families. While they are, of course, loved by their foster families, they deserved their own homes where they could thrive as a cherished member of the family.

This also helped the overall morale of the organization, as volunteers were encouraged to see these adoptions and felt reinvigorated by the happy endings. The morale boost helps us continue our mission to save new kittens who come to take the places of those who were adopted.

How many pets did this grant help?

28

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Wilbur and Templeton (first photo, middle row) were originally with Fayette Humane Society as newborns. A foster volunteer bottle-fed and raised them until they were adopted in January. Unfortunately, the adoptive family’s circumstances changed soon after that when their new owner took a job overseas and would not be able to bring the boys with her. She surrendered Wilbur and Templeton in March, and there was not a dry eye in the house. She was devastated to not be able to keep them, and the volunteers were distraught at seeing the brothers confused and stressed by the upheaval. Because of this grant, Fayette Humane Society was able to offer bonded pairs a discounted adoption fee, and it did not take long until a new family fell in love with their sweet demeanor and beautiful coloring and quickly made the decision to adopt Wilbur and Templeton together!

Animal Rescue of the Rockies: Purina New Year, New Home Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

To cover adoption fees for some of our harder-to-adopt pets.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped to encourage adopters to consider some of our older adoptable pets and those with medical or behavioral issues.

How many pets did this grant help?

Six so far, with another 10 pets still waiting for forever homes.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Ringo is a 4-year-old black-and-white tuxedo cat who was found as a stray in a Denver, Colorado, neighborhood with a severely injured and infected front paw. Jenni Leigh, an experienced Animal Rescue of the Rockies cat foster (first photo), took him into her home. Multiple veterinary visits determined that Ringo’s paw and leg couldn’t be saved, so he underwent amputation surgery. Ringo’s behavior had been unpredictable from the day he was rescued, and although he could be the most sweet and loving cat, sometimes he unexpectedly turned into a biting, scratching little monster. Jenni was bitten and scratched by him enough to need medical attention on more than one occasion, but she didn’t give up on him. She took him to an animal behaviorist, who prescribed anti-anxiety medication for him, which he takes on a daily basis. Ringo spent more than two years in his foster home before he was finally adopted on April 29, 2019, thanks to the Purina New Year, New Home grant that covered his adoption fee. His new mom, Joan (second photo), just adores him, and so far he has been very well-behaved and seems to be thriving in his new forever home.

Barren River Animal Welfare Association (BRAWA): Purina New Year, New Home Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Since receiving the grant funds in March 2019, BRAWA was able to reduce adoption fees on hard-to-place dogs including special breeds such as pit bulls, disabled and senior dogs, black dogs, large dogs, and those with behavioral issues. In most cases, regular adoption fees were reduced by 50%. Signage was placed on select dogs saying “The Petfinder Foundation is Helping Me Find a Home.”

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

BRAWA operates completely on grants, donations, fundraisers, and revenue generated from adoption fees. The grant funds help offset the revenue that we lost due to the reduced adoption fees.

How many pets did this grant help?

To date, the grant has benefited 27 dogs.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Stumpy (first photo) is a 7-year-old pit bull mix weighing 70 lbs. and with three legs. For these reasons, he was often overlooked at the shelter, and the staff at BRAWA knew it would take a special family to provide the support and care he needed. He was originally adopted from BRAWA in 2017; however, he was returned to the shelter in March 2019 as a stray and his previous owner did not reclaim him. He was adopted within a week on March 23, 2019, by a family with another pit bull. They immediately fell in love with Stumpy and he was very happy to get his new family (second photo).

Barbary (third photo) is typical of the many pit bulls and similar breeds taken in at BRAWA. He came to us a stray by way of Animal Control. When he first arrived, he showed signs of neglect, had fighting scars and skin issues, and was in poor condition. He received extensive medical treatment and was at the shelter for more than two months before being adopted by a wonderful new family. His fee was reduced as a result of the Petfinder Foundation grant. He was adopted on May 17, 2019.

As you can see from the fourth photo, Cierra is very happy with her new family. A pit bull mix, she was overlooked for weeks at the shelter. She was adopted at a special off-site adoption day and her fee was reduced thanks to the Petfinder Foundation Grant. She went home with a great family — and a big smile — on May 19, 2019.

Rubble (fifth photo) is another disabled dog who benefited from the Petfinder Foundation grant. He is a boxer/shepherd mix with three legs. He was originally adopted from our shelter in 2018; however, he was returned in April 2019 due to the adopter’s personal issues. He was adopted on May 11, 2019. We also placed several other dogs with vision/hearing issues.

Yogi (sixth photo) is a large Mastiff/Boxer mix. He was an owner-surrender due to the owner’s health issues. Yogi was scared and confused about why he was at the shelter and because of his large size, he was often passed by for adoption. He was at the shelter for over a month and was adopted and benefited from the reduced adoption fee adopted on April 20, 2019.