Purina New Year, New Home

Hood River Adopt a Dog: Purina New Year, New Home Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The money was used to purchase an e-training collar and training for an approved adopter for Athena.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant allowed for the purchase of the e-collar and training that we would not have been able to do at the time of Athena’s adoption.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Athena has been part of our program since 2017. She has been placed in an adoptive family and returned due to her hyper and excitable personality three times. After the third attempt, she was fostered with Northwest Balanced Dogs and trained using an e-training collar. When the latest family applied and was approved, HRAAD used the grant money to purchase Athena an e-collar and have Northwest Balance Dogs work to train Athena’s new family on its proper use. Unfortunately, Athena was returned to HRAAD after 45 days due to a unpredicted change in the family’s domestic situation. Meet Athena here.

Humane Society of Yates County: Purina New Year, New Home Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

We will be using this money to have a pet-adoption weekend where we will waive the adoption fees. We are waiting until we have an abundance of cats ready for this day.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We have not utilized the grant yet.

How many pets did this grant help?

We have not utilized the grant yet

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We have not utilized the grant yet

Tiny Paws Kitten Rescue, Inc.: Purina New Year, New Home Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The New Year, New Home grant has been and continues to be used for reducing our adoption fee from $60 to $30.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

In a number of ways:
1. It helps publicize Tiny Paws Kitten Rescue as a reliable kitten adoption source because it is supported by respected entities such as the Petfinder Foundation and Nestle.
2. It helps make more adoptable kittens available to more qualified forever homes.
3. It helps publicize Tiny Paws Kitten Rescue as a safe, no-kill rescue to which people can bring orphaned newborn kittens for lifesaving care.
4. It reduces the rescue-to-adoption time, which reduces rescue costs, makes room for more rescued kittens, and cuts down on housed kittens’ exposure to communicable ailments in the rescue.
5. It makes Tiny Paws more appealing to prospective volunteers because they know that Tiny Paws is supported by such a well-known funding source.

How many pets did this grant help?

To date, 99 kittens have been adopted with the New Year, New Home grant. The adoption rate will really pick up next week when the spring litters begin to become adoptable.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Cheryl (first photo) was brought to Tiny Paws as a supposedly young pregnant cat who was sick and being beaten up by other cats. Upon evaluation by the Tiny Paws veterinarian, Cheryl was found to be about 11 years old (believe it or not), very pregnant, and sick with an upper-respiratory infection, gum disease and FIV. She was successfully treated for all of these conditions and had teeth pulled. Tiny Paws provided her with comfortable, safe surroundings for her and her babies, along with highly nutritious food and lots of loving care. When Cheryl was listed for adoption, the purrfect home applied to adopt her as the home’s one and only furry love. Cheryl’s new mom (pictured with her) was surprised and very grateful for the New Year, New Home grant support of her adoption.

Starsky (second photo) was thrown from the window of a moving car onto a front lawn. The good Samaritan in the house found the nearly lifeless body of the tiny kitten and brought it to Tiny Paws. Rescue volunteers rushed the kitten to the veterinarian, where he was given lifesaving treatment and X-rays. It was found that Starsky had disabled hind legs and a congenital digestive issue. Tiny Paws nursed him to top form, given his condition. When the veterinarian said he was ready, Starsky was listed for adoption with full disclosure of his special needs. His new mom (pictured with him) fell in love with his photo at first sight. Starsky’s special adoption fee was an unexpected gift for his new mom.

Animal Outreach of Shelby County: Purina New Year, New Home Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

We used the grant to offer FREE adult-cat adoptions to adopters who passed through our screening process.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We specifically targeted several regional open-admission shelters to help them with cats they were having trouble placing: FIV+, older, cats with weird medical stuff (profiled later in this report), long-termers, shy cats. We didn’t target the cute and cuddlies for this grant.

How many pets did this grant help?

26

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Sweet Pea was at a municipal shelter up in northern Indiana. She had the benefit of a local sponsor, so she was able to visit the vet several times for a raging, full-body ringworm infection. They had tried all the usual treatments, but the inconsistency of treatment, coupled with the stress of shelter life, meant that little Sweet Pea just wasn’t getting any better and was put on their urgent medical-rescue list. The poor girl needed some rescuing.

A foster stepped up and we were able to pull her. It took several different attempts and the right combination of drugs and medicated dips, but five months and 22 ringworm cultures later, she was finally ringworm-free and ready for adoption.

Tracy has previously adopted outside, community cats to have on her working farm, so we knew her well. After her elderly tortie cat passed away, Tracy started thinking about another inside-only cat.

It was truly love at first sight. We had made a “storyboard” chronicling Sweet Pea’s journey to health and asking for donations to help pay her mounting medical bills. Well, Tracy took one look at the pictures and declared Sweet Pea to be hers. She was so patient. It took another four months before Sweet Pea could join Tracy’s family, but it was worth the wait!

Shelter From the Storm: Purina New Year, New Home Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

This grant money was used to provide reduced adoption fees.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We were able to reduce the adoption fees for 19 dogs in our care to help them find homes quicker.

How many pets did this grant help?

19

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

When Pumpkin Spice (first photo) came to our rescue from one of the animal-control facilities we work with, she had a very large inguinal hernia. During surgery, we found her spleen to be entrapped in the hernia as well as her small bowel. During the first surgery, we had to remove her spleen and repair the hernia defect. Unfortunately, she had to have three more surgical procedures and lots of wound-management before everything was healed and she was able to go up for adoption. After many months of care, she was finally able to go up for adoption. She is an easy, fun-loving, sweet girl — unless there are cats around, and in that case, she likes to be naughty. Pumpkin Spice may be a little bit older, but she has plenty of spunk and is sure to bring a smile to your face. She has been adopted.

Here Today Adopted Tomorrow Animal Sanctuary, Inc.: Purina New Year, New Home Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The grant money was used to reduce adoption fees for spirit cats (shy/fearful cats) and chronically ill cats and help pay their medical bills before and after adoption (our Care for Life Program).

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Since becoming open-admission in 2018, Here Today Adopted Tomorrow (HTAT) has been taking in more cats that are traditionally seen as hard to adopt. The Purina New Year, New Home grant has helped us remove the barrier of price from adoption. When combined with HTAT’s innovative adoption programming for special-needs cats, we have been able to find furever homes for cats whom we would have been unable to help before, including shy/fearful cats and chronically ill cats, making it possible for HTAT to remain open-admission and no-kill to more effectively serve our community.

How many pets did this grant help?

To date, nine cats have been adopted and seven are currently on the adoption floor because of funds from this grant.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

George (first photo) is a tuxedo cat who came in when his owner passed away. He had just been diagnosed as a diabetic. He would sometimes get a bit cranky with the other cats, but once his blood sugar was under control, he became a new cat. He is 10 years old but plays like a kitten. He loves children, almost more than adults. Catherine and her fiancé walked in one day and fell in love with him. Catherine is a home health aide, so giving George his insulin shots was no big deal to her. The cost of his care, on the other hand, was daunting. Thanks to the Purina New Year, New Home grant, George is in our Care for Life program and HTAT is helping to pay for his medical care. Now George lives with Catherine and her family and has a little girl (Catherine’s daughter) to call his own.

Mr. Bigglesworth (second photo) came to HTAT at 5 years old as a timid cat after living his life outside. He had an upper-respiratory infection and a mouth infection and needed a dental. Chou Chou (third photo) was a shy kitten who wanted nothing more than to sit in a warm lap. Mr. Bigglesworth and Chou Chou are both tuxedo cats, so it was often assumed that they were related. However, they were just two stray cats from two different towns who happened to arrive at HTAT at about the same time. Both cats have feline leukemia (FeLV).

In most shelters, cats with FeLV don’t get a chance. They are simply euthanized, regardless of whether they are currently healthy or not. At Here Today, we believe that every cat deserves a chance, and we have a special room just for FeLV+ cats because FeLV is easily transmitted between cats. Thanks to the Purina New Year, New Home grant, we were able to get Mr. Bigglesworth and Chou Chou the medical care and testing they needed to be ready for adoption. The reduced adoption fee and the Care for Life program help nudge adopters who may be hesitant to adopt our FeLV+ cats.

Barbara and her daughter already had an FeLV+ cat named Clown at home and wanted some friends for her. They were excited to adopt BOTH Mr. Biggleswoth and Chou Chou. Both cats are doing well in their new home. Mr. Bigglesworth is enjoying more human interaction and Chou Chou is acting like a real kitten. See the picture of her cuddling with her new friend Clown (fourth photo).

Also included are photos of a few cats currently up for adoption thanks to the Purina New Year, New Home grant:

Chai (fifth photo): Diabetic, Care for Life Meet Chai here.

Addie (sixth photo): Tail-pull Injury, Care for Life Meet Addie here.

July (sixth photo): Spirit Cat Meet July here.

Clarissa (seventh photo): Spirit Cat Meet Clarissa here.

Franklin County Humane Society DBA Paws for Life NC: Purina New Year, New Home Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The grant of $1,500 was used to reduce the adoption fees of cats aged 1 year and older from $95 to $40. It was also used to reduce the adoption fees of dogs who have been up for adoption for a long time (six months to more than a year) from $225 to $100.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant was essential in marketing cats and dogs who had been with us a while. It provided a new way to highlight the pets on social media, as well as in their biographies on our website and on Petfinder. Although the reduction in fees was not the only reason people adopted, it was an added incentive to meet pets who had been overlooked. Several of the pets adopted through this grant had been with Paws for Life NC for over a year. The adoptions freed up space in foster homes, allowing us to help more pets. The grant was also a morale boost to our volunteers and generated excitement by helping more animals find homes. We are incredibly thankful for Purina and the Petfinder Foundation’s generous grant, which helped 19 pets find forever homes and helped 15 shelter animals move from an overcrowded county shelter into foster care.

How many pets did this grant help?

19

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Gunther is a sweet, petite, friendly dog with silly ears. In February 2018, he was pulled by Paws for Life NC from the Franklin County shelter. The Franklin County shelter is an open-intake shelter and Gunther’s time was nearly up. Luckily, we had someone to foster Gunther and he moved into a foster home. Sadly, he was found to be heartworm-positive. After spending some time getting healthy and putting on a little weight in foster care, he was neutered and treated for heartworm. In March 2018, he went up for adoption, and for over a year, Gunther was overlooked.

His foster mom took great pictures, wrote an excellent bio, and took him to community events and adoption events. She shared his photo and story on Facebook, but no one was interested. Gunther also has a wonderful personality — the spunky little guy, at just 50 lbs., likes to play but seems to have a good read on the dogs around him. If he’s with a playful pup, he will tumble and play; if he’s with an older, reserved dog, he will relax with them. He is eager to please, and loves affection and learning what it is to be a warm and cozy indoor doggie. We just had no idea why he was not finding a home.

Shortly after we reduced Gunther’s fee thanks to the grant, he received an application. The home trial was successful, and after 14 months and five days in foster care, he has found his forever! His dad says, “We can’t imagine life without him. He has done so well at our house! He has two kitty brothers, Russel (he’s 22) and Sam, and they all tolerate each other.” It was a tearful day for his foster mom, but she was so happy to see him happy.

Gunther’s foster mom says, “Thank you, Petfinder Foundation, for this wonderful grant! My foster pup Gunther (Gunny) is on home trial and the discounted adoption fee was one of the reasons they chose him — not because they can’t afford the fee, but they want to spoil him with extra toys and treats and a fancy new bed. The other reason was the video of Gunny and my cat playing sweetly together. The adopters have a 20-year-old kitty and they needed a dog who was very cat-friendly!”

Montgomery County Animal Care and Control: Purina New Year, New Home Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Nestle Purina’s New Year New Home grant was to provide reduced-fee and fee-waived adoptions to members of the community.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The Nestle Purina New Year New Home grant provided Montgomery County Animal Care and Control with the means to find 22 dogs and cats new homes through fee-reduced and fee-waived adoptions. Many in our community have wanted to adopt but, due to cost, sometimes responsible pet owners have been unable to adopt, and the Nestle Purina Grant opened those doors to members of our community. Being a large military community, we also provided alternatives to our military Gold Star families by providing fee-waived adoptions to those tremendously brave families. We also provided fee-waived adoptions to our combat-wounded warriors and reduced-fee adoptions to all active-duty military members. Many of these animals found forever homes thanks to the tremendous generosity of Nestle Purina and the Petfinder Foundation.

How many pets did this grant help?

22

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Our great story begins with Ginger. Ginger came to us as an unwanted puppy from her previous owner, who was just unable to care for Ginger any longer due to an unexpected move to a smaller apartment. Ginger required a great deal of exercise and attention, being a husky mix, and it was just unfair to allow her to be cramped in a small apartment all day long. Ginger struggled here at the shelter, as many pets do when they are separated from their owners. Ginger had begun to show signs of depression from not being able to run or have a great deal of human interaction as she was accustomed to. Enter the Larusch family. The family came to the shelter one day looking for an energetic younger dog who could be active with their 13-year-old daughter. They spent a great deal of time with Ginger and found an immediate connection. Their daughter loved to be outside playing and being active. They immediately fell in love and were excited to be able to take Ginger home. Ginger has spent the last few weeks running free in the family’s fenced-in yard, and going on long walks with the family and field trips to the park. We are so grateful that Ginger found her forever home.

Charlie's Angels Animal Rescue: Purina New Year, New Home Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

We spent the grant money on rehoming three pairs of bonded senior dogs: Cap and Perseus, Colby and Aires, and Buddy and Copper. We were able to waive the adoption fee on one of the dogs in each pair. Buddy needed heartworm treatment. Colby and Aires both required extensive treatment because one is blind and had an eye infection and both had extensive skin problems.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We were able to provide all the necessary medical treatments and were able to help the adopters afford to adopt the pairs.

How many pets did this grant help?

6

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Cap and Perseus (first photo) were both scheduled for euthanasia. They were deemed to be unadoptable because they were both so terrified of people, especially men. Our volunteer tasked with pulling dogs from the county shelter felt like both could be saved with proper care. She pulled Cap and placed him with a volunteer foster home, where he almost immediately overcame his fears. Because of that success, she then pulled Perseus and placed him with the same foster family. After a while, he began to bond with Cap, to the point where they could be walked, as long as they were together. Cap became so attached to his foster parents he would not interact with potential adopters, so the fosters adopted him. We waived the adoption fee on Perseus so he could remain with Cap.

Humane Society of the Ohio Valley: Purina New Year, New Home Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

This grant money was used to offset adoption fees during the months of April and May.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant allowed us to lower our adoption fees, which enticed potential adopters to visit the shelter. Once at the shelter, many folks fell in love with and adopted their new best friends. This allowed HSOV to clear several kennels and open them up for other animals who needed temporary housing.

How many pets did this grant help?

During April, 44 dogs and 26 cats were adopted. During May, 35 dogs and 32 cats were adopted.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Baine was a 4-year-old male boxer/pit bull mix who was surrendered by his owner on June 7, 2018. Although Baine was good with kids, housebroken and crate-trained, he got overlooked by potential adopters. In October of 2018, Baine was adopted. However, he proved not to be a good fit for the family and was returned. Volunteers gave him extra attention upon his return, but he seemed to be depressed and confused by what he had experienced. Baine was adopted again in November 2018 and was once again returned. His disposition turned to one of despair as he waited for his forever home. Finally, in April 2019, Baine hit the jackpot and was adopted by a family that loves and spoils him.