Purina New Year, New Home

Senior Dog Rescue of Oregon: Purina New Year, New Home Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The money was used to offset adoption fees.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant made it possible for more senior citizens and veterans to adopt senior dogs. It was also used to waive fees for hard-to-place dogs who had extensive medical needs.

How many pets did this grant help?

The grant allowed us to offer reduced adoption fees for 90 dogs, and waived fees for another five dogs from the time the grant was received until the present time.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Freckles was a very elderly sweet Australian shepherd who came to us because his human had passed away. He needed love and stability, and, as it turned out, a whole lot of medical care. Freckles was obese, and his nasal passages were raw and ulcerated. Our vet diagnosed Freckles with discoid lupus erythematosus (DLE), a canine version of lupus that caused sores in his nasal tissues, and a thyroid condition, which contributed to his obesity.

We found a wonderful foster for Freckles and he soon settled into their home, made friends with their terrier, and began to adjust to his new life. And then something awful happened: Freckles tore the canid cruciate ligament in his back leg (the dog equivalent of an ACL tear in a human knee), a painful and debilitating injury. The combination of his excessive weight, atrophied muscles, and the steroid treatment he was taking for his lupus proved too much for his knee. Without the surgery, Freckles would be in too much pain to have a decent quality of life. But the surgery cost thousands of dollars. SDRO is funded exclusively through donations and the hard work of volunteers. With the money it would take to fix Freckles’ knee, SDRO could help many, many other dogs who also needed love, care, and new homes.

But we weren’t ready to give up on Freckles. Freckles’ foster family started a GoFundMe campaign to pay for Freckles’ surgery, and shared it on Facebook. Friends, colleagues, and even a few strangers donated to help Freckles. When we reached $1,000 after three days, we were able to go ahead with surgery.

Repairing a torn CCL requires reconstructing the knee by inserting a wedge into the bone of the lower femur. It is an invasive surgery with a long recovery, made even longer for Freckles by the side effects of the medication to treat his lupus. After surgery, Freckles needed round-the-clock care, which his foster family lovingly provided, until the wedge healed into the bone.

They told us, “Through the winter, Freckles healed. Week by week, he needed less and less assistance walking. His mood brightened; his energy increased. The lesions in his nose turned from red to healthy pink. His weight went down. He became more present in his eyes, more trusting and bonded to our family. At Christmas, he was unable to move anywhere on his own, but by January, he could get up and down on his own. In February, when it snowed Freckles stood in the yard and wagged his tail as our children built a snowman. And by March he was walking around the garden, exploring the flowers sprouting from the earth.” Freckles was ready for adoption.

After nursing Freckles through so much trauma, and growing to love him, Freckles’ foster family gave him the ultimate gift of love: a forever home of his own! From the moment his new mom sat down on the floor with Freckles, it was clear that they were meant to be together and that Freckles would be adored and thriving in their care. However, he would continue to need medical care throughout his life. With the aid of the Petfinder Foundation New Year, New Home Pet Adoption grant, Senior Dog Rescue was able to waive the adoption fee for Freckles.

A Pathway to Hope: Purina New Year, New Home Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The funds were used to provide waived or reduced adoption fees for some of our long-term dogs and cats in foster or boarding.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped to get several of our longer-term dogs and cats adopted. We featured some of our adoptables with the reduced fee and were successful in placing several.

How many pets did this grant help?

6

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Taylor (first and second photos) is a sweet, playful girl who was born in foster care with her brother and sisters. She is a purring machine, so happy and content. We knew that Taylor would bring a whole lot of love to a family, but for some reason, this quiet beauty was overlooked for months and months. We featured Taylor with the fact that her adoption fee was sponsored, and she soon found an amazing home. We always say that the longest fosters are just waiting for the perfect home to come along!

Hood River Adopt a Dog: Purina New Year, New Home Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

HRAAD was able to waive the $250 adoption fees for four long-term, difficult-to-adopt dogs.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Cooper (first photo), a 5-year-old coonhound who had been in our program for four months after being rescued from a difficult living situation
Snickers (second photo), a 2-year-old border collie who’d been surrendered with dog-aggression issues
Athena (third photo), a terrier mix who had been in our program for more than a year and a half, and who’d been adopted and returned three times due to hyperactivity and dog-aggression
Morgan (fourth photo), a 5-year-old Shih Tzu who’d been surrendered with extensive medical issues

How many pets did this grant help?

4

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Cooper (first photo) was a 5-year-old coonhound who had been in and out of our shelter as a stray a number of times. Each time, his owners would scrap together the funds needed to pay his fines and take him home to a dirty and multi-individual living situation. He would be tied up outside until he would escape again. He was flea-infested, had multiple ear infections, his nails were overgrown, and he was not neutered. Once HRAAD finally got him into our program, we had him neutered and got his ear infections and fleas under control. It took three crew members and multiple attempts to get his nails to a normal length. Due to his size, his coonhound “bark,” and his lack of proper socialization, we found we were having a difficult time finding him a new home. We were starting to discuss a transfer to a more rural partner organization when a young couple with a background in hounds found him on Petfinder. They fell in love Cooper, but were concerned about the cost. Upon approval of their adoption, they were ecstatic to find out that his adoption fee had been waived! They were so excited that they immediately started halter- and behavior-training. Cooper is loving life with his new family and is enjoying being trained to “use his nose”!

SPCA of Anne Arundel County: Purina New Year, New Home Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

These funds were used to discount the adoption fees of cats available for adoption.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Because of this grant, we reached our goal of facilitating 150 cat adoptions.

How many pets did this grant help?

150, as well as countless others whom we were able to accept into our shelter to take the vacated spaces.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Mr. Good Cat (first photo) lives up to his name! An affectionate lap cat, he was devastated when his owner died. He came to our shelter frightened and depressed to leave the only home he had ever known. We are so proud to report that he has been adopted. Now happy in his new home, Mr. Good Cat spends his days surrounded by love once again.

Humane Society of Yates County: Purina New Year, New Home Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The money distributed is to go towards a free adoption event. We are planning the year carefully and have intentions to hold this adoption day on Nov. 9, 2019, in order to maximize our impact.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant WILL help us draw attention to our shelter and find forever homes for animals who may have otherwise been overlooked here at the shelter. We are intending to hold this adoption-day event on Nov. 9, 2019. This date fits well into our calendar of events, with tourist season [being over] and local schools being back in session and folks ready to get settled in for the winter with a new companion.

How many pets did this grant help?

We have not utilized the grant yet.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Stay tuned!

Converse Animal Shelter, Inc.: Purina New Year, New Home Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

CASI received a grant from the Petfinder Foundation’s New Year, New Home campaign. We divided the $2,000 grant so that we could apply $50 to each dog adoption. CASI was able to lower the adoption fee to $100 for 40 different dog adoptions.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The San Antonio, Texas, area has a low cost of living, but also has lower salaries than most of the state. People are very cost-conscious when making a purchase. By lowering the adoption fee to $100, CASI was able to get these animals adopted, which raised the morale of the staff and volunteers at the shelter. Of course, the animals, who were adopted into good homes, and their new families were thrilled as well.

How many pets did this grant help?

Forty individual dogs were adopted through this grant, making room at the shelter to take in more abandoned pets.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Bentley, a 15-year-old hound (first photo), was left in a carrier at CASI’s gate in 2004. She was adopted in December 2009 but unfortunately was returned in February 2016 due to the poor health of her adopter. She found a second home in August 2016, but was returned to CASI in October 2018 when her owner lost her job and had to move in with relatives. A couple came to see her in August 2019 and they both fell in love with her. The fact that the adoption fee was down to $100 helped these adopters make up their minds to take Bentley home (second photo).

A lady surrendered a tiny white Chihuahua (third photo) to CASI in February 2019. The 4-year-old female pup had been the constant companion of a relative from the time she was 6 weeks old. Her owner had passed away and Baby was inconsolable; she hid from everyone, she cried constantly, and our staff was unable to comfort her. A lovely lady visited CASI in August of 2019; Baby climbed into the lady’s arms and we knew they were a match. The grant made it possible for the adopter to cover the adoption fee with her senior citizen’s income.

In June of 2019, a thin, balding little gray dog showed up at our gate. Hunter (fourth photo) turned out to be a very pregnant 3-year-old Siberian husky who was suffering from mange. With a lot of love, medical treatment, and good nutritious food, she turned into a sweet, beautiful dog. After she had her five puppies, we were able to put her up for adoption. Her coat has grown in and she has gained a healthy amount of weight. A couple came to CASI and, thanks to the reduced adoption fee, they were able to take Hunter home with them.

Animal House Shelter: Purina New Year, New Home Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The grant was used to support our programs that waive adoption donations or give discounts to those in need.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant gave us the ability to adopt out pets to those who would otherwise be unable to due to financial restrictions.

How many pets did this grant help?

4

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Wendy was relinquished to the shelter after her owner passed away. Because she was 12 years old, many people passed her over, until one day a very nice older lady on a fixed income came in and met her and fell in love. AHS was able to waive the adoption donation as part of a senior-to-senior program to make the adoption a reality!

Here is a list of 12 pets who were able to be adopted with the help of the grant, with detailed information about each pet’s original adoption donation and their discounts:

Wendy (first photo)- $300 of $300 was waived to help a senior on a fixed income adopt a senior pet.
Slick- $175 of $350 was discounted to allow a struggling military family to adopt.
Willy (second photo)- $300 of $300 was waived to help a low-income family adopt a senior pet.
Malibu and Cubby- $400 of $400 was waived to allow this bonded pair of dogs to be adopted together. The family would have otherwise been unable to adopt them both due to funds.
Macy- $112.50 of $450 was discounted for a low-income family to adopt a puppy.
Opal (third photo)- $75 of $75 waived to allow a low-income senior to adopt a cat.
Prince (fourth photo)- $112.50 of $450 was discounted for a struggling family to adopt a puppy.
Caroline- $300 of $300 was waived so that her foster could officially adopt her and make her a part of the family forever!
Rainy- $112.50 of $450 was discounted for a low-income family to adopt a puppy.
Weston (fifth photo)- $100 of $400 discounted for a disabled veteran.
Harper- $100 of $400 discounted for a young man getting on his feet. He plans to have Harper as his comfort dog.

Animal House Shelter: Purina New Year, New Home Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Additional medical care of pets in need

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Provided much-needed medical care and needed surgeries

How many pets did this grant help?

4

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Paige came into the shelter with an injured and severely painful eye. With this grant’s help, we were able to perform an enuclation surgery to remove her painful eye. She is now a happy, thriving puppy looking for her forever home! Meet Paige here.

SPCA Florida: Purina New Year, New Home Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The money was used to reduce adoption fees at the Mega Adoption Event in June 2019. The first of its kind in Lakeland, Florida, the Mega Adoption Event brought many local organizations together – including Polk County Animal Control, Humane Society of Polk County, and 15 for-profit veterinary clinics who not only donated time and resources to help prepare pets for adoption, but also participated in the event and helped us find homes for all these pets.

We have a rampant problem with homeless pets in Polk County, and this adoption event truly made a difference in finding homes for pets in need and making room in the shelters.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The “New Year New Home” grant was a tremendous help. Thanks to this grant – and other sponsors – we were able to lower adoption fees to $20 for a day. The Mega Adoption Event became more popular than we could have anticipated, with a line around the building hours before we opened. It is heartwarming to see so many pets find homes, and so many families find love in just one day.

How many pets did this grant help?

294

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Buster spent quite some time at SPCA Florida. This sweet and loving boy had to live in an office because he refused to eat without company, and being away from the adoption floor made it difficult for him to find a home. He found his purrfect match at the adoption event and his new family sent photos of him at home the same afternoon!

We made a video from the event, it doesn’t show the true impact, but it tells the story better than words:

Haven Humane Society: Purina New Year, New Home Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

An adoption incentive for cats over a year old so they could get adopted before the kittens took over the adoption center.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We had several older cats who had been at the adoption center for a long time or who had been adopted and returned. We knew once the kittens started filling the adoption center, these older cats would be passed up for kittens and would spend many more months living in cat kennels. This grant helped those cats get into homes before kitten season started.

How many pets did this grant help?

40

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Autumn was a Carr Fire evacuee. Her owner brought her to Haven Humane Society for temporary shelter when she was evacuated from her home. Her home had burned down and she never returned for Autumn. Autumn was adopted, but returned to the shelter after four months because she hid under the bed all the time and was frightened by the family’s energy. Thurman was also adopted and returned. Thurman had been caught in a trap and brought to Haven Humane Society. Our staff worked with shy Thurman for a month and he became a friendly, loving cat. He was adopted, but was later returned for being aggressive. Thanks to this grant, Autumn and Thurman got a second chance — together! The Price family adopted both of them in May and they are living happily ever after.