MyRescue.dog

Bryan and Amanda Bickell Foundation: MyRescue.dog Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

We used the funds from the Petfinder Foundation to hold a “Pit Bull” Health Clinic for the residents of Waukegan, IL, and the response was overwhelmingly positive! Not only did we service 200 “pit bull”-type dogs, but we signed up 70% of those dogs for spay/neuter appointments! We were able to provide distemper/parvo vaccines, rabies shots, microchips, spay/neuter appointments, and brand new leashes, harnesses, and collars because of our support from you! We also traded in improper leashes, harnesses, and collars for brand new ones! In addition, we gave away sample bags of food Earthborn Holistic Pet Food and discussed nutrition with owners.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Waukegan, an underserved and low-income city in the northern suburbs of Chicago, had not previously had any free or subsidized assistance for pet owners. Our program was the first in the city to offer free vaccines, microchipping and spay and neuter appointments. Because of the low rates of spaying and neutering in Waukegan, accidental breeding was common and rates of pets in custody of animal control was very high. We were able to spay and neuter over 200 dogs owned by families that would not have been able to cover the cost. If each of these dogs were to have produced even one liter, we would have been looking at between 16,000 to 20,000 puppies.

How many pets did this grant help?

200

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Max, a 2-year-old “pit bull,” attended our clinic and received vaccines and a microchip. At the clinic, his owner also signed him up for a free neuter through our partnership with a local vet. Upon going to the vet for his neuter it was found that he had a hernia. Had he not attended the clinic, it would not have been diagnosed. The Bickell Foundation not only covered the cost of the neuter, but also the hernia treatment.

In addition, we assisted a dog named Chula who also came to the clinic. She arrived sick and coughing and it was determined that she had an upper respiratory infection. Her owner indicated that she could not pay for the treatment, so we immediately transported her to a local vet and pledged to cover the vet bill. While being seen for her infection, it was also determined that she was heartworm-positive, so we also covered the cost of clearing her of heartworms.

National Mill Dog Rescue: MyRescue.dog Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The money covered the costs of 20 dogs’ entry into freedom. From the time they arrived in November to the time they were adopted to new homes, these dogs received loving daily care and veterinary services averaging $250 per dog. The daily care was provided at our wonderful, large kennel facility in Peyton, Colo., by a host of volunteers. Veterinary care was provided at our on-site clinic by our staff of highly qualified veterinarians and technicians. Each dog we rescue receives spay/neuter surgery, heartworm testing, deworming, microchipping, extensive dental surgery due to years of neglect and poor food at the mills, treatment for parasite infestation, which is normal at the mills, treatment for eye and ear infections and injuries, as needed, removal of mammary tumors.

In addition to the in-house care, we spend an average of $9,000 a month for veterinary care at outside clinics for those dogs that require specialized treatment or surgery.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped prepare 20 dogs for life as a family pet, after years of living life as a breeding machine in a puppy mill. It helped not only with the daily care and veterinary care described above, but helped facilitate their adoption to new homes through our paid-staff adoptions coordinator and it helped support our website, where available dogs and our adoption application are accessed.

How many pets did this grant help?

20

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Journey is the ideal new name for a 2-year-old Havanese we called Captain when we rescued him in November, because his new people traveled through many states looking for him and they’ll be traveling through many more with him on board their RV! Having lost their Westie in December, this compassionate couple realized that they couldn’t be in a home — or an RV — without a dog. Their search for the right puppy included trips from Colorado to New Mexico and Arizona. But when they saw Journey’s picture on the National Mill Dog Rescue website, they headed straight for our Peyton, Colo., kennel.

In a recent conversation, Journey’s new mom says the little guy is adjusting very well, is learning about potty training, is eating with enthusiasm and is a “joy to us.” Described as loving, playful, attentive, inquisitive and alert, Journey has found two dedicated, loving parents. What’s more, when he’s not on the road, Journey will be enjoying his home and lots of open space on 7 acres.

Having had experience with their Westie, also a puppy-mill survivor, Journey’s mom and dad are committed to providing as perfect a home as possible for their new addition. As his mom says: “Journey is in our life forever.”