Grant Opportunities from the Petfinder Foundation

LifeLine Animal Project: Grant Opportunities from the Petfinder Foundation Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

At LifeLine’s DeKalb County Animal Services, we used the emergency foster-kit grant money to buy supplies for our individual dog-foster kits. A large portion of this money was used to purchase crates, of which we are perpetually in need, as well as flea/tick preventatives, martingale collars, Kongs and seat-belt harnesses. We also put the money toward other supplies, including “Adopt Me” collars, harnesses, and leashes. Several of these foster kits were used during our Home for the Pawlidays program, where fosters sign up to take a dog home for the week of Thanksgiving.

At LifeLine’s Fulton County Animal Services, the grant money provided crates, collars, leashes, harnesses, toys and other basic supplies to allow fosters to take and safely foster an animal in need. Prior to the grant, we literally had no crates at FCAS with which to send out medium to large dogs. Lack of supportive supplies is always a hindrance to recruiting new fosters and getting them to commit to caring for an animal outside of the shelter.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The foster supplies that we were able to purchase with the Petfinder Foundation grant have allowed us to have ready-to-go foster kits for our foster program. Having these kits ready and available not only expedited our foster process, allowing more animals to leave, but it also helped to remove barriers for those who had previously been hesitant about fostering due to financial constraints.

How many pets did this grant help?

On average, a full foster kit costs around $100-$125, depending on the size of the dog, as well as what supplies the foster parent may or may not already have. We estimate that we were able to get between 80 and 100 dogs into foster homes because we had foster kits available to support the foster parents.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Princess Buttercup (first photo) came into the shelter emaciated and extremely shy. She was very scared of noises and needed a quiet home in which to decompress. She was able to leave with a foster family who would work on her social skills while she gained her health. They fell in love and later adopted her!

We received the foster supplies that were bought using the grant money right before our big Home for the Pawlidays foster event. During this event, members of the public sign up to take a foster dog home for the week of Thanksgiving. Two of our heartworm-positive, senior dogs went out during this event and have since turned into longer-term fosters. Sandman, the cute brindle in the Santa picture (second photo), worked his magic on his foster parents and convinced them to foster him through his heartworm treatment.

Router, the handsome pup with the bowtie (third photo), also ended up being a longer-term foster and has since gone through his heartworm treatment as well. Last week, Router’s foster emailed me that she was going to adopt him because she couldn’t imagine him ever leaving her home.

Both of these foster parents were sent out with supplies acquired through the Petfinder Foundation grant. We believe they chose to extend their foster period beyond the Thanksgiving break because they were sent home with the necessary resources/supplies and felt supported by our foster program as a result.

Humane Society of Tuolumne County: Grant Opportunities from the Petfinder Foundation Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

We received a $1000 grant and used it for medical emergencies over and above our normal spay and neuter charges from our veterinarians.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We were able to get several animals help with ear, bladder, and upper respiratory infections.
We want to thank PetFinder for this much needed $1000. As you can see below, it was put to good use.

How many pets did this grant help?

Three

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Sam was 2-1/2 year old Border Collie/Spaniel mix and was surrendered to us in May of 2014. Being a Spaniel, they are prone to ear infections and Sam had a very serious one. He was taken to the veterinarian and examined and put on antibiotic ear drops, prednisone, and Fluconazole and was seen at the vet each week lavage treatments..total time was from May 28 through June 27, 2014 and the cost was $630.17. He is now in a loving and wonderful home and his ear infection is gone.
Chloe was a female Airdale Terrier mix, six months old, and was treated for a bladder infection which included a radiograph, Urinalysis, and antibiotics. She has also been adopted and is in a happy home…cost $256.09.
Biscuit was a kitten who came down with a URI which we treated at the shelter, however, she wasn’t improving so she was seen at the veterinary hospital. They administered an antibiotic injection and sent her home with Amoxicilin drops. She steadily improved. She is very happy and healthy with her new family…cost $101.78

CRASH's LANDING: Grant Opportunities from the Petfinder Foundation Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Microchips! the pet will permanently be registered to US in the event that the owner were to lose, abandon, relinquish custody of (HOPEFULLY NOT ANY OF THESE) so that we would be notified and be able to retrieve our cat!

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Peace of mind! Security and safety!

How many pets did this grant help?

100

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

I am microchipping every single cat we take in and also chipping all of the 260 current cats in our program.

Humane Society of Baltimore County: Grant Opportunities from the Petfinder Foundation Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The grant from the PetFinder Foundation was used to support daily operations at the Baltimore Humane Society’s no-kill animal shelter. Currently, the shelter is providing temporary shelter, food, medical care, and behavioral training to nearly 150 unwanted, abandoned, abused, and neglected dogs, cats, and other small companion animals.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant was used to support the Baltimore Humane Society’s mission to find loving forever homes for animals in the shelter’s care. This mission is accomplished through adoption events, promotion on the BHS website and services like PetFinder, and publicity through local media outlets.

How many pets did this grant help?

150

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Lacey was a high energy pit-mix who came to BHS after having to be surrendered by her owner. As a special needs dog –in her case, deaf–finding a true forever home was a difficult proposition, but because of the grant from PetFinder Foundation and the Baltimore Humane Society’s no-kill philosophy, Lacey found her happy ever after! A photo is included of her new family.

City of Chico Animal Shelter: Grant Opportunities from the Petfinder Foundation Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

To purchase a video camera with tripod, light and microphone. This is being used two ways, one to record our temperament testing using the ASPCA S.A.F.E.R. test, and to make videos of the dogs we have for adoption.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Provided us with a tool to accurately assess dogs’ temperaments in order to determine the best homes for them. Also a tool to better highlight the dogs’ personalities to the public.

How many pets did this grant help?

59 dos were put into the adoption program since the start of March when the camera was purchased 🙂

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Two examples of dogs this grant has helped are Lloyd 13040014 and Flicka 13040027. Lloyd was a stray and Flicka was brought in by her owner. We were able to temperament test them by recording staff doing the SAFER Temperament test. This allows us to review the temperament test and ensure consistency with the test, as well as lets us see things that would normally be missed by both handler and observer when doing the test. We are then able to use the teperament test to determine the best placement options for the dogs. Flicka was recently adopted, and Lloyd went to our adoption partner (Butte Humane Society) and is avaliable for adoption through them.