Emergency Medical Grant

Missy’s Haven: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Joy’s surgery

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Because of the grant money received, we were able to have surgery on Joy for her femur, paw, and hip.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Meet Joy! This little girl came into our local Animal Control after being kicked from a balcony. She was in pretty bad shape. At just 7 weeks old and 2.5 lbs., she needed extensive surgery for repair of her leg. She had a broken femur, torn tendons, and a dislocated knee. How anyone could be so cruel to such an innocent pup, I will never know. The only thing we could do was mend, love, and care for her and ensure she found the perfect home!

Without surgery, she would have lost her leg. At such a young age, she deserved a chance to play as a puppy and grow to have a better life. After all was said and done, she ended up with three pins in her leg.

She has since found her forever home and is enjoying life. It took hard, dedicated teamwork and I commend my team for all their efforts and all the wonderful adopters we have that give our pets new beginnings in life after MHCR. Thank you for your support.

Oshkosh Area Humane Society: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Dr. Jim Ziegler of Wolf River Veterinary Clinic in New London saw Nova for a orthopedic exam on June 25, 2020. He was diagnosed with grade-3 luxating patellas in both legs. The grant money was used to pay $33 for the examination.

Surgery was done on Tuesday, July 14, 2020. The grant money also covered his surgical costs totaling $935.28. There is a $31.72 balance after all expenses were paid.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Nova was able to have surgery to correct his double knee problem, which improved his gait, movement, and muscle tone. He is now able to walk and run without pain and he can now lie on his back, which he really loves to do! This dog cannot get enough belly rubs!

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Nova was transferred to Oshkosh Area Humane Society (OAHS) through the Tiny Paws Rescue in Western Wisconsin on May 29, 2020. He was originally owned by a military family, and they could no longer keep him. Nova is a 4-year-old male.

We were told he had a “bum hip” and swings his leg. It turned out that his knee was in very bad condition; it was thickened and had a luxating (dislocated) patella and was painful if manipulated. Nova had super wobbly kneecaps that affected his gait, movement, muscle tone, and overall comfort when moving.

Dr. Ziegler recommended that both knees be done at the same time to save the shelter some money and a dog needs an extensive recovery period from back-to-back knee surgeries. He recovered in a foster home.

Anna Engberg adopted Nova. In October 2020, she reported: “He is loving his new life! I kept his name. He gets so sassy and excited when it comes to treats. Some of his favorite things to do are to sun tan, go for walks, and get belly rubs. He loves to lounge around at birthday parties, the farms, mom’s deck, and at the beach. He is such a lady’s man and will do anything for attention. He just got some new kitty friends and is enjoying their company. Nova was truly the perfect fit for me! Thank you for letting me show him what love was again! He really is the happiest dog in the world.”

Fuzzy Pawz Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Fuzzy Pawz Rescue is so grateful to be the recipient of the Emergency Medical Grant. The $1,000 grant award would be used to offset the cost of medical bills associated with the identification and treatment of what has now been diagnosed as a rare case of sialadenosis [chronic swelling of the salivary glands].

At the time of the original grant request, Fuzzy Pawz Rescue had spent $6,418.53 on the hospitalization, assessment and treatment of Diesel. Thanks to the support of amazing veterinarians, Diesel is now making a full recovery in his foster home and is healthy enough to be neutered next week.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Because we are a small, foster-based, private, non-profit rescue, finances are often the limiting factor when it comes to the number of animals that can be served. Medical costs are the largest financial burden for the rescue and can dictate what future animals can and cannot be brought into the rescue.

Because this condition is so hard to diagnose (often only diagnosed after significant funds have been spent ruling out other diagnoses), it is under-researched and not often observed in the veterinary community. This grant helped make diagnosis and recovery an option for such a unique case.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Diesel was surrendered to Fuzzy Pawz Rescue by his owners after they ran out of funds to provide him with the medical care needed to diagnose and treat an unidentified ailment. Diesel’s previous owners indicated that he has been struggling with food intake, severe pain and vomiting on and off for almost five years.

Diesel came into the rescue presenting with bizarre symptoms: extreme stomach pain/cramping, excessive drooling, no appetite, vomiting, inconsistent soft poop, and neck spasms. He was also underweight and dehydrated. When he first came to his foster home, he was in dire need of medical care, in visible pain, and had pain responses with gentle touch anywhere in the abdominal area.

Due to his significant lethargy, pain, and other alarming symptoms, he was immediately brought to a trusted vet clinic. This clinic did initial care and testing on Diesel and quickly determined that he needed more intensive care from a specialized internist. He was then admitted to West Vet Emergency Hospital and stayed there for specialty care for five days.

Thankfully, due to diligent research from specialists, this issue has been identified as an incredibly rare condition called sialadenosis, which is the enlargement and overactivity of the salivary glands.

Diesel is now, as of last week, healthy enough to be neutered for adoption and will be posted for adoption soon.

Copiah Animal Shelter: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Surgery for puppy Vanna’s broken leg

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The Petfinder Foundation Emergency Medical Grant helped Copiah Animal Shelter with the costs of surgically repairing and saving puppy Vanna’s broken leg. Vanna recovered full use of her leg, with no limp, and is free from pain.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Vanna, a Magical Mississippi Mixed-Breed puppy (aka mutt), approximately 3 months old, was found in a rural area as a starving little stray with a broken leg. She was suffering in pain, emaciated, loaded with parasites, fleas and ticks, and had swollen lymph nodes and a bad skin condition. Copiah Animal Shelter took Vanna directly to the veterinarian and to surgery the next morning to see if her broken distal femur could be repaired or her leg would need to be amputated. Cross pins were inserted during surgery and her leg was saved! After time in a foster home and treatments for other health conditions, Vanna now has full use of her leg with no limp and is no longer in pain! Vanna was accepted by one of Copiah Animal Shelter’s northern rescue partners for adoption and found her family in mid-October 2020!

Cat Tales Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

It is for a few of our special-needs kittens who had to have emergency surgery. We had Rowdy, who had both eyes removed; Bandit, who also had both eyes removed; and Toby, who had his leg removed.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We are a very small non-profit and we have taken on more special-needs kitties and ones who have needed extreme medical care, including surgeries. Two had both eyes removed, one had a leg removed, two had one eye removed, and now we have one who needs a wheelchair because she has swimmer’s syndrome.

How many pets did this grant help?

4

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Rowdy was found in the middle of the road. It was amazing that she was not killed by a car, as she could not see. Rowdy’s eyes were ulcerated out of her head. She had to have both eyes removed immediately. She has since been adopted and is now living her best life (first photo).

Valley Humane Society: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The $1,000 grant was used to pay for part of the surgery needed to repair Gracie’s ear and ear canal. The surgery cost nearly $3,000, so the Emergency Medical Grant helped offset that large medical bill.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped us in several ways. First, it helped offset the large medical bill that the organization incurred as a result of the necessary surgery on Gracie’s ear and ear canal.

Second, it allowed the organization the ability to develop a plan quickly that was not just about the surgical bill, but also an aftercare plan that could be discussed with potential adopters.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Gracie was a puppy who had been found at 4 months old, injured and in need of advanced medical care for her left ear. She was found with a rubber band tied around her head, and her hair had grown over the rubber band.

Because Gracie was so young, there was plenty of concern about her chances to keep her ear, as well as the risk of infection due to the length of time that her injury had been left untreated.

Our call to action for help with medical costs during the early stages of the pandemic helped us develop a strategy to provide different levels of care. First, the rubber band had to be removed and Gracie had to heal from that procedure. Subsequently, she had to have costly surgery to repair her ear canal. That surgery was successful and Gracie’s hearing was fully restored.

Thanks to an Emergency Medical Grant from the Petfinder Foundation, Valley Humane Society medical staff was able to seek the proper care needed to treat Gracie’s ear. The $1,000 Emergency Medical Grant covered a portion of Gracie’s surgery that allowed Valley Humane Society to successfully repair her ear.

She spent her recuperation with a wonderful foster family, and she entertained them with her goofy antics. She blossomed into dog who was ready to start the next chapter of her life!

Gracie is now Maya Moore Treats, and is living her best life, one that includes trips to the beaches, socially-distant walks with her “furever” family, and enjoying the world with full hearing.

The pictures provided show the full transformation of Maya. Thank you, Petfinder Foundation.

PurHaven, Inc.: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The Emergency Medical Grant of $700 was used for surgery to remove a large, infected inner-ear polyp and also the biopsy for a cat we named Lefty.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The Emergency Medical Grant saved the life of one unassuming little tabby cat whom we brought to our sanctuary who had been doing his mousing job for a dairy farmer but was never going to receive the medical care he would need to restore his health and live a pain-free life.

How many pets did this grant help?

One cat

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Lefty is a sweet boy whom we encountered as part of a group of dairy farm cats in Maryland that we were trapping to spay/neuter and vaccinate. He had a head tilt at that time; the ear polyp was tiny and the vet at the TNR clinic could not remove it because it was so deep in his ear.

We kept him at our sanctuary so we could monitor him, and I am glad we did because the polyp grew so large that is grew out of his ear (while the last photo is not the best, you can see the pink thing in the container and it is the size of my thumb!).

We drove two hours to the eastern shore of Maryland to a vet who did these kinds of ear-polyp removals at a reasonable cost, where they drill into the bone in the neck and remove the polyp from the side.

Lefty still has a head tilt, and the vet said that it will most likely never go away. But Lefty gets around just fine and he has adjusted to seeing life at an angle! Lefty is still looking for his forever home, but it will need to be a very special one. Until that time, he will remain here at our sanctuary in Western Maryland, where he can live indoors and outdoors (his choice) within the protection of a fenced yard. He loves to bask in the sunlight and play with the leaves as they dance in the breeze.

Underdog Animal Rescue and Rehab: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The $1,000 grant was used to help pay for medical bills at Mill Creek Animal Hospital in Moab, Utah, for our rescue dog Risotto, who had to undergo two surgeries to repair his broken hip, broken tibial plateau, and shattered ankle.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Risotto was found on the side of the highway with two broken back legs, unable to walk. Our rescue took him straight to the vet, where we racked up some pretty big bills repairing his extensive injuries. This grant helped us to cover some of the costs of Risotto’s medical bills in a timely manner. We are always in need of emergency medical funding, and the Petfinder Foundation came through to help us save the life of this sweet dog, who is now happy and healed with his forever family.

How many pets did this grant help?

One

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Kathy, a steadfast Underdog volunteer and longtime supporter of reservation animals, was on her way to pick up an abandoned litter of nine puppies at a water well when she found Risotto sitting on the side of the road. Kathy pulled over and approached him, knowing something was wrong. She tried to get him into her car, but he couldn’t walk. That’s when she realized he couldn’t use his back legs at all. Through sheer strength of will, Kathy picked him up and loaded him into her car, then picked up the other 14 abandoned dogs that were her goal and drove them several hours to Underdog Rescue and Rehab in Moab, UT.

Risotto was taken immediately to the emergency vet. He spent the following six nights in the hospital, first being stabilized and watched for internal injuries since he had large amounts of blood in his urine. When he was stable, he underwent two surgeries for a broken hip, a broken tibial plateau, and a shattered ankle (he was neutered at the same time). He was in intensive care for three nights.

Through all of this, Risotto never showed one bit of aggression or unhappiness. He is a sweet, affectionate boy whom we feel fortunate to have been able to help.

Risotto spent about a month recovering in foster care before finding his forever home. He is now living his best life with his family here in Moab, Utah, and while he is still building up strength in his back end, his vet expects him to make a full recovery.

The Humane Society of McCormick County, Inc.: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Suki was found with a very painful condition known as cherry eyes. We could see that she had scratched at her eyes and her eyes were constantly tearing up. Left untreated, cherry eye causes infections and dry eye, which can lead to blindness.

The surgeon recommended that they create pockets for those inflamed eyelids in an effort to avoid a dry-eye condition that can occur with the traditional method of treating cherry eyes. Because Suki was miserable, we went ahead with the surgery in hopes that the Petfinder Foundation could help us with the cost. The charge was $250 for the surgery on both eyes and $100 for the anesthesia, for a total of $350.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We have already picked up several dogs with broken legs that needed surgery and emergency care this year. With cancelled fundraisers and our resale store being closed due to COVID, we didn’t know how we were going to give Suki the care she needed. We were so grateful that the Petfinder Foundation was able to help Suki.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

A volunteer’s dogs started barking and when the volunteer looked outside, Suki was on her doorstep. She had been dropped off without an explanation. Suki was just 6 months old and in terrible shape. Both eyes had a condition known as cherry eye, as well as eye infections. She was also missing most of her hair from scratching it off because of demodex mange.

With her immune system compromised like this, she was miserable, but she was still friendly and a little shy. The volunteer kept her overnight, gave her a bath, and brought her to the shelter the next day.

We immediately took her to a surgeon to have her eyes looked at and to draw up a plan for treatment. She was given Simplicef antibiotic for her skin infections and given her first set of vaccinations and a rabies shot.

Different methods were considered to correct the condition cherry eye, but Dr. Covar recommended that they create a pocket for that eyelid. The old method is to remove the eyelid, and although this method is less expensive, it can lead to dry eye and, since she had such bad infections, we didn’t want to risk her having any more complications.

Surgery was scheduled for a week later on July 28. Suki went back to the surgeon to have her eyes checked on Aug. 4, 6, and 18. She also received her second set of vaccinations and was spayed.

Suki immediately started to feel better. We work with a great rescue in Connecticut and, when she was healed up, she was transferred to Save a Life Dog Rescue. Suki is in a foster home and doing great. The family loves her and we are hopeful that she will find a forever home soon.

Companion Cats: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Braxton’s dental

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We have many older cats who often require medical attention. We often have to find the money to pay for these much-needed services outside of our budget. This dental grant saved a life.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Braxton underwent a dental procedure for a condition called stomatitis. Because he was in so much pain, he quit eating. To save his life, a feeding tube was surgically inserted so he could be fed and be given antibiotics. Once he was off the feeding tube and stable, he had his dental procedure completed. Braxton is no longer in pain and is recovering nicely.

Braxton went to a foster home so he could get away from the stress of the shelter. This wonderful family is a “foster failure” and he has been adopted. He’s much happier now.