Emergency Medical Grant

Poodle and Pooch Rescue of Florida: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The money from this grant was spent on treatment for a dog named Priscilla who was hit by a car and brought into Poodle and Pooch. In addition to her hip and leg injuries, due to the trauma from the car hit, the blood vessels below the skin weren’t getting blood flow, causing vascular necrosis. The wound was seeping and the vet determined that Priscilla needed to stay at the vet hospital for an extended time for wound care. On a daily basis, she received injectable fluids, injectable antibiotics, cold laser treatment, and honey wraps. Her circulation was terrible and the vet thought this could be a contributing factor to her heart disease — her lungs sounded very noisy, so the vet increased her heart medication. The wound required tie-over bandages and around-the-clock care and wound treatment.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The Petfinder Foundation Emergency Medical Grant allowed us to say yes to the local shelter when they called us about a dog in need. Priscilla deserved a second chance, and with these funds, PPR was able to focus on getting her the treatment she needed, letting her heal, and rehabilitating her, rather than worrying about the steep medical bills to cover her costly treatment.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Priscilla was living on the streets as a stray and was hit by a car. Fortunately, she was brought to a local animal shelter for treatment and PPR was able to step in and bring Priscilla into our rescue family to ensure she received all the treatment she needed to recover from her accident. Priscilla is an 8-year-old, 18-lb. poodle blend. This incredibly sweet girl makes friends with everyone she meets, and her sweet little face with the most heartwarming eyes will just light up any room!

Once she was fully healed, we listed her for adoption on Petfinder and it wasn’t long until she found her match. This wonderful little gal was thrilled to find her adopter, Elaine, to spend her life with, and we are SO very happy for Priscilla. Retiree Elaine was really missing have a dog in her home, and she fell in love with Priscilla. We are confident Elaine and Priscilla will share a lovely life together. We just know Priscilla has an AWESOME life to look forward to with all the joys of a warm home, a loving family, and a sense of security. These happy endings wouldn’t be possible without generous grants from organizations like the Petfinder Foundation. Thank you for all you do, from the bottom of Priscilla’s heart and all of us at Poodle and Pooch Rescue!

Philadelphia Animal Welfare Society (PAWS): Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Funds helped cover the cost of emergency medical care for Barley, a shelter dog in our care.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Thanks to the Petfinder Foundation, Barley is happy, healthy, and loved in her adoptive home! After her hospitalization, Barley continued to make a smooth recovery and is now in stable health.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Barley came to PAWS as a seemingly straightforward medical case similar to many of the pets we save: She was found as a stray with an injured front leg, brought to Philadelphia’s animal-control shelter, and needed diagnostics and care beyond their resources. As that shelter’s largest lifesaving partner, PAWS was called upon to transfer her in. We rescued her, x-rayed her leg to rule out a fracture, and scheduled her for a routine spay. Halfway through her spay surgery, her situation turned critical: Barley’s blood wasn’t coagulating properly, and she was hemorrhaging into her abdomen.

Our vet staff worked for hours to stabilize her, but it became clear that she needed emergency intervention to survive, so we rushed her to Veterinary Specialty and Emergency Center, a longtime partner of PAWS. After an additional surgery, 48 hours of round-the-clock care, and multiple plasma transfusions to give her body what it needed to clot, Barley pulled through. She was diagnosed as having an unknown blood-clotting disorder and was soon stable enough to begin recuperating in a foster home.

Although she’s been recovering steadily, Barley recently hit another roadblock when her injured leg took a turn for the worse. Her original medical plan included exploratory leg surgery, which had to be pushed back after her emergency. But when she stopped eating and stopped bearing weight on her leg, the risk of waiting became too great. Our veterinary staff operated immediately and discovered a rubber band wrapped around her leg bone that was so deeply embedded, her skin had completely healed over it.

In foster care, Barley had a continued journey of healing as we learned more about her coagulative disorder and possible long-term effects of her leg injury. Once she was ready for adoption, we listed her on Petfinder and she soon found a loving home with adopter Francis.

Francis says: “Thank you so much for introducing me to Barley and letting me bring her home. I’ve never received so many puppy kisses! Made her a fancy dinner and now it’s time to get her acclimated. Thank you for introducing us! You have no idea how much this has changed my life.”⁠

We announced Barley’s adoption, with tagged recognition to Petfinder Foundation, on Facebook and Instagram.

Cenla Cat Project: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Veterinary care for Pyewacket, a 6-month-old kitten who had been hit by a car and suffered substantial injuries.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Pyewacket was found by a good Samaritan and surrendered to Cenla Cat Project. He had a broken rear leg, a broken pelvis, and a severe inguinal hernia. His veterinary bills were more than $4,000. With help from our Facebook community and an Emergency Medical Grant from the Petfinder Foundation, his medical treatment was covered.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Pyewacket has been one fortunate feline. His luck began when a good Samaritan reached out to Cenla Cat Project (CCP) and we agreed to take him. How could we not find a way to help this little 6-month-old Siamese mix who purred the whole time he was being examined?

We were told that he would need major surgery and time to heal. His luck continued when the Petfinder Foundation and our Facebook community rallied to cover his veterinary expenses. He had to be kenneled for six weeks after his surgery to heal, and he continued to offer purrs for his caretakers.

We knew Pye would find his home quickly once he was healed and put up for adoption. We didn’t realize it would happen within two hours of being posted! This handsome boy found a great family. He has a kitty brother at home and two children who love him. His parents are spoiling him, which makes us happy. We are ever so grateful for his recovery and adoption.

New Hope Dog Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

This grant was used for Randy’s care. When he arrived at New Hope, he had a broken leg with the bone sticking out of the skin.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant assisted in covering the cost of the amputation of Randy’s leg and his care.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Randy arrived at New Hope on Feb. 3, 2021, after we were contacted by a front-line rescuer about an injured dog who had a fractured leg with the bone sticking out. We made arrangements to immediately go out and pick Randy up. He was taken directly to the Western College of Veterinary Medicine emergency department. It appeared that his injury was an old fracture and he was now fighting an infection.

He was examined and stabilized. On Feb. 4, he was taken to Orchard Veterinary Care, where he had his leg amputated later that day.

Randy spent 30 days in his foster home, healing from his surgery. Once he was cleared for adoption on March 4, he was added to Petfinder as an adoptable dog.

Randy found his loving forever home on March 15 and has been adopted by an amazing family.

We were thrilled to be recipients of the Emergency Medical Grant from the Petfinder Foundation. 100% of the grant went towards Randy’s extensive medical costs.

Cochise Canine Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

We spent the $500 toward medical care, in particular to provide Princess with the eye enucleation she needed. To date this year, we have spent more than $16,000 for veterinary care, medicines and prescription diets for the animals in CCR’s care.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It enabled us to provide the veterinary care they need!

How many pets did this grant help?

One in particular; a dozen total

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Princess, a senior Chihuahua in our care, went blind and required eye enucleation when her eyes began to swell and cause her pain. The enucleation was performed by Dr. Monika Knoblich of All Creatures Veterinary in Benson, AZ. The cost was over $600. The third photo shows Princess pre-enucleation; the first and second show her during her healing phase. She is doing wonderfully now!

Mutts in a Rut Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The money was used toward femoral head osteotomy (FHO) surgery for Clara.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Clara was able to get the surgery she so desperately needed.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Clara, who came into Mutts in a Rut Rescue after lingering in a rural shelter for four years, needed surgery on her leg to give her a chance at adoption. She had the surgery and is doing well in her foster home. Clara has weekly water rehab to help heal her leg. She’s a wonderful, sweet dog and has been given a second chance thanks to the Petfinder Foundation. She is now up for adoption. Meet Clara here.

Franklin County Humane Society/Paws for Life NC: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Mayzie’s knee surgery

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We will be forever grateful for the support from the Petfinder Foundation. With your support, we were able to help pay Mayzie’s medical bill and continue our mission of saving more animals in need.

How many pets did this grant help?

One pet: Mayzie

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

It was obvious that Mayzie had had a rough start in life. She was physically abused, with broken bones and a displaced kneecap. She was found on the side of the road and picked up by local Animal Control. With few resources, the local animal shelter reached out to us here at Paws For Life for help. We knew we could not let Mayzie suffer, so we took her into one of our loving foster homes. She had her RidgeStop™ patella luxation repair surgery with extensive recovery. Within the next week or so, she will have a debridement and possibly surgery on the other side.

Here are notes from Dr. Hummel from Mayzie’s last visit:

“Saw Mayzie on Tuesday and wanted to touch base. She is moving and can use the leg. I think the swelling is less and the inflammation is less, but there is a gait abnormality. Whether that is due to the long-term problems she had before you got her and it is just how she is, I am not totally sure. There is a mild amount of inflammation and crepitus and some scar tissue.

“I think our options are to continue to give a her little more time or to consider opening up the joint and debriding to see if we can get her more functional on the leg. Like I said, I am unsure if this is just her based on her having this issue since she was young and she feels good, or if opening it up would make a difference.”

We are continuing to care for Mayzie with another surgery in the future! She is obviously not yet adopted but is looking forward to finding her future home in 2021.

Bullies and Buddies Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Medical: vet bill

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The generous Petfinder Foundation Emergency Medical Grant helped our sweet boy Nash get the medical care he needed.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We got an urgent call from the shelter about a sweet dog who had possibly been hit by a car and had a broken leg. We named him Nash and rushed him to the emergency vet, who confirmed that Nash had a broken femur (ouch), and that it was broken in three places. We had to wait to do surgery because Nash had blood (fluid) around his lungs and that needed to dissipate. His pain was being managed.

Our sweet boy had surgery to repair his femur, recovered at his foster home and then was adopted to a loving family!

Meriden Humane Society: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Manny was left on our doorstep in terrible condition. Immediately after we found him and a did quick scan of his physical shape, we brought him to our vet for a full examination. Ten days after that full exam, Manny received the following services:

Ear ablation (ear with tumor)
Mass removed near testicle
Pathology report: ear tumor tested benign; scrotum mass tested malignant
Neutered
8 teeth removed
Echocardiogram for detected heart murmur

After all procedures, his total vet care exceeded $3,000.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant was applied towards the $3,000 in veterinary expenses needed to treat the variety of medical issues Manny was facing.

How many pets did this grant help?

One: Manny

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

On the morning of Oct. 10, 2020, we found this lovely little guy named Manny at our door. Manny’s owners had left a note saying they could not afford to care for him and knew he deserved more. We rushed Manny to our vet, who quickly determined that Manny had very bad teeth and a tumor that went deep into his ear and connected multiple places down into the ear canal.

Needless to say, Manny required a lot of medical attention before we could find him a home. We worked to find a specialist who would advise us on the ear tumor, and ensured he got the dental work he needed and was neutered and fully vaccinated. Along the way, Manny was diagnosed with a malignant scrotum mass, although we learned that the tumors in his ears were benign.

All during his recovery, Manny spent his days in foster care to ensure he had as comfortable and safe an environment as possible in which to heal and regain his strength.

We are happy to report that Manny was officially adopted by his foster family right before Christmas 2020 and continues to live an amazingly happy, spoiled (and well-deserved) life with his incredible forever family. Manny’s story is one of true success and illustrates the power of dedication, love, and perseverance.

Speak St. Louis: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The grant money was used to help pay for a lifesaving surgery on a foster pup, Greta.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant contributed toward a successful craniotomy for Greta.

How many pets did this grant help?

This grant helped save one precious life.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We were asked to help Greta because she was deaf and because no one else would help. Dogs with special needs are not easily adoptable.

On the day of transport, we learned that Greta sometimes falls over because she was dropped as a puppy. As soon as we met her, we learned there has to be much more to Greta’s story than we will ever know.

She had suffered horrible physical trauma, enough so that two different veterinarians who examined her felt she had brain damage. She had multiple deep-tissue scars on her head and nose, a suspected broken rib, and her jaw had been displaced. These were the things we could physically see. Her foster parents helped her heal the inner, emotional scars. Thankfully, Greta is a forgiving sweet soul despite the awful trauma she endured at the hands of a monster.

Because of the pandemic, it took a while to get an appointment to see a neurologist, but we finally did. In the meantime, Greta developed a large mass at the base of her skull. At our appointment, the doctor felt her daily falling-over and rolling episodes appeared to be vestibular rather than brain damage; perhaps the bones in her inner ear could have been broken during her abuse. That would also explain why she is deaf.

This could not be determined without an MRI. Before an MRI and spinal tap could be performed, the mass needed to be aspirated. The results came back this week and while there is a little bacteria present that we are treating, the experts felt the mass is a seroma, which developed from severe head trauma. They were not even aware of Greta’s detailed history.

Thankfully, we had so much support for Greta and a village to be grateful for, starting with Dr. Shomper, a talented and trusted neurologist at VSS who performed a craniotomy; devoted and caring foster parents who had no idea whether Greta would ever live to see this day; and people who believed, as we did, that Greta deserved a chance at a happy and healthy life.

Greta’s surgery was in September and it is still surreal that we were able to make brain surgery for her chance at a better life a reality. Her foster parents struggled with having to keep Greta calm during several weeks of recovery. Finally, she was taken off crate restriction and Greta’s foster parents needed a respite during an out-of-town trip. Greta went to stay with a temporary foster home, one who knows and adores the Rottweiler breed, a home with two dogs, Parker and Petey, who happen to also adore Greta.

Then today, Greta saw Dr. Shomper again. While she still has some ataxia (weakness in her legs) and her gait can be a little wobbly, he thinks she looks fabulous and will keep improving. At this time, he sees no reason for any further follow-up appointments and that Greta can finally enjoy her puppyhood. She is doing exactly that in her temporary home, which is now her forever home! Her new mom has been teaching her sign language and Greta has learned that, besides life itself, playing ball is one of life’s other greatest gifts.

We are eternally grateful to everyone who made this day possible for Greta!