Emergency Medical Grant

Rejection Collection Boxer Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

This grant money paid for the medical treatments that Lou needed: Specifically, he had a UTI and this grant paid for analysis and treatment of that; he had a terrible case of worms; he needed surgery to remove three tumors and surgery to remove four rotten teeth. The grant also paid for all costs associated with these procedures, including anesthesia and antibiotics.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped RCBR by allowing us to pay for expensive treatments for Lou that were necessary not only to improve his quality and length of life, but also to increase his chances of adoption. Because of this grant, we were able to use the RCBR funds that would have otherwise been dedicated to Lou’s needs to rescue another dog.

How many pets did this grant help?

One directly (Lou); at least one other dog indirectly (because Lou’s needs were met through this grant, we were able to use the RCBR funds that would have been used for him to rescue another dog).

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Lou came to RCBR as an owner-surrender and the first intake of 2020. His owner had rescued him from an abuse situation and he had lived with her and several other dogs for about five years. Though he was deeply loved, he received minimal to no medical care during this time. His owner became terminally ill and unable to provide for Lou’s needs, including all of the medical concerns that had been building over time. For this reason, Lou was surrendered by his owner to RCBR. His owner was heartbroken, but this was a gift of a new life to Lou!

Lou’s medical needs included removal of four tumors, treatment of a significant urinary-tract infection and terrible case of worms, and significant dental work that included the extraction of four teeth. The Petfinder Foundation Emergency grant was used to meet these needs. Lou’s foster mama with RCBR remembers, “Lou was one of those fosters that you are a little afraid to take on. When he came to us, he was wetting all over the house and when they crated him he would mess and wet in his crate. With his original owners, he would consume the feces and lie in his urine.

“As we found out, he had never been to a vet. Lou had a severe UTI and his system was overwhelmed with worms. He had an odor that was so horrendous that you really had to force yourself to get close to him. Once we vetted him and treated the UTI and worms, we found out the smell was from several abscesses in his mouth and began a course of antibiotics, and everything started to fall into place. This boy had been doing the best he possibly could with the pain he was in. Surprisingly, Lou, although he was in a lot of pain, was never mean. He always was happy to greet you, had a wiggle when you spoke to him and never attempted to be nasty no matter what had to be done to take care of him.

“I think the best part was after the dental when his mouth didn’t hurt anymore. He could eat without having to move the food around in his mouth so that he could swallow it. Lou was the picture of a perfect save, this lovely boy, who hurt so bad but was still sweet, happy, and so grateful for the companionship he so desired. Lou was a success story that a rescue can accomplish: Take a sick dog, correct the problems, show him how to behave in a home situation, and watch the boy blossom. That was Lou.”

Lou had his surgeries on Feb. 17, 2020, healed nicely, and was adopted on Feb. 29, 2020! Not only did he find his forever home with the Gavin family, but he also gained a new fur brother, also from RCBR, who had been adopted by the Gavins earlier that month.

In Lou’s own words (lovingly provided by his new forever mom and dad): “Every night, Hugo and I cuddle with Dad on the couch while Mom plays with yarn and a metal stick thing. But she is making something [with] lots of colors. Anyway, I love it here. My mom and dad and bro are super cool and love me. My other humans like to pet me and give me belly rubs. Sometimes we get treats but not all the time. I really like treats but I think Mom wants to make sure we don’t eat too many at once. Sometimes we lie in the kitchen while Mom and Dad drink brown stuff and talk. Hugo and I lie on their feet to keep them warm. Mom and Dad seem to like that.

“Hey, thanks for reading my story. I sure hope that all the boxers in this world get to have families like mine.”

Thank you, Petfinder Foundation, for your help in getting Lou to his very best forever home and life.

Paws Animal Shelter: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Paws Animal Shelter received an Emergency Medical Grant to cover required surgery for Blue. The veterinarian for our shelter determined that he had a past break which was never treated and did not heal properly. To a layman, it sounds as though his femur was smashed into the hip joint and they fused together. This prohibited normal back-leg movement, and it definitely caused him pain when he walked. He needed a femoral head ostectomy to fix his damaged hip. This surgery was performed on Feb. 19, and the grant money covered a majority of the cost of this surgery.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant made a tremendous difference in the quality of life for Blue, and it made him adoptable (we had multiple people interested in him, but the prospect of paying more than $1,000 for surgery put all of them off). Blue’s surgery went extremely well, and his recovery was everything we could have hoped for. He stayed overnight at the veterinary hospital, and his foster mom picked him up the next day and took him home. He made a remarkable recovery and is running around today and playing like a perfectly healthy young cat. We couldn’t be more pleased that we were able to get this sweet cat the surgery he needed. It has resulted in a complete change in his life.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Paws Animal Shelter received an emergency medical grant to cover required surgery for Blue. He needed a femoral head ostectomy to fix his damaged hip. As Blue was going to require extra care after his surgery, we decided to seek a foster family to care for him. In order to minimize the stress and trauma to Blue, we thought it would be ideal if this family could foster him for a couple of weeks before his surgery, so he would get used to them and their home ahead of time. His foster family took him home on Jan. 24, and his surgery occurred on Feb. 19. This strategy turned out great, as Blue didn’t have the stress of surgery along with stress of a new environment and new people.

Blue’s surgery went extremely well, and his recovery was everything we could have hoped for. He stayed overnight at the veterinary hospital, and his foster mom picked him up the next day and took him home. He had to wear an Elizabethan collar (commonly called a “cone of shame”!) for two weeks, but he did very well with it. He obviously didn’t like it, but he didn’t react as negatively as most cats do. On the 25th of February, his foster mom reported: “He doesn’t like it but is tolerating it much better than I thought he would. His movement improves every day.”

We received another update from his foster mom on March 7, when she wrote: “A picture of Blue’s boo-boo. He’s doing great. The cone is off and he’s a happy boy. He’s been running and playing like nothing has ever happened.”

During this time frame, the sister of Blue’s former mom (his former mom was in hospice care when we took Blue in; she has since passed away) stopped by the shelter to visit Blue. We filled her in on his surgery and the fact that he was in foster care. She gave us more background that explains Blue’s original injury. Blue’s mom rescued him from a neighbor’s house. These people were drug users, and they had an 8-year old son who abused animals. When she witnessed him swinging Blue around by one of his legs, she took Blue and adopted him. She had subsequently noticed him limping but didn’t think he was in pain.

Though Blue’s start in life was certainly awful, it has totally turned around. His injuries have been fixed thanks to the generous support of the Petfinder Foundation, and best of all, his foster family has fallen in love with him and is adopting him. His foster mom told us, “I fell in love with him instantly and he really adjusted well to our home. This picture is before his surgery; he thinks he’s hiding from me. This is a happy ending for Blue and me. I’m thankful for the opportunity to care for such a beautiful gift from God.”

Thanks to a string of caring people, from the woman who initially rescued him, to the people at Paws Animal Shelter who cared for him and investigated his injuries, to the Petfinder Foundation which helped fund his surgery, to the veterinarian and his staff who performed the surgery, and to his wonderful new adoptive family, life has turned around for this sweet young cat. This is why we’re all involved in animal rescue: to help save gentle souls like his!

Attached are multiple photos showing Blue in his foster home (now his forever home!), after his surgery, and with his new family.

Humane Society for Animals, Inc.: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Veterinary expenses to repair a broken leg in a puppy to make her adoptable. The veterinarian suggested that this leg was probably broken some time ago and never repaired correctly.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Our organization has a mission to get all animals in the best shape to be adoptable even if this requires substantial veterinary expenses. The Petfinder Foundation grant helped us with the reimbursement of Hazel’s surgery so we could continue to invest in our animals’ needs.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

The puppy (Hazel) came into our shelter with her brother. One of our volunteer dog walkers noticed her brother received a lot of attention from potential adopters while Hazel hopped about on three legs and was overlooked. Hazel had surgery on her leg on Dec. 25, 2019, was spayed on Jan. 3, 2020, and was immediately fostered out to her fairy godmother/dog walker and then adopted on Jan. 5, 2020. Her new family at once relished Hazel’s loving personality when she came into their home.

St. Francis Society: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

St. Francis Society received a grant for $795 for the emergency medical needs of Leipshin, a stray cat found wandering the streets with a prolapsed colon.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped us provide emergency surgery for Leipshin’s prolapsed colon.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

When a member of the community saw a stray cat with a prolapsed colon she reached out to numerous rescues for help. Only St. Francis Society answered her call for help. We immediately dispatched a volunteer to get the cat and rushed her to a veterinarian. Leipshin was rushed into emergency surgery and, fortunately, recovered quickly. However, it was discovered that, in addition to a prolapsed colon, she also suffered from terrible cases of lice, ringworm and scabies. It took her a couple of months to heal from all of her skin issues, but we are happy to report that she was adopted this weekend into a loving home!

Cats Meow Feline Fosters, Inc.: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

An Emergency Medical Grant in the amount of $920 was used toward corrective eyelid surgery for a male kitten named Simon.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The corrective eyelid surgery was needed for Simon so that he would be comfortable, and so that his vision would allow him to enjoy his life. It also made him adoptable.

How many pets did this grant help?

One

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Simon came to us from the local animal control officer after he was surrendered to the shelter. At that time, shelter intake was closed, so he came directly to us. A local vet could have corrected a condition called entropion, but Simon’s condition was eyelid agenesis, which required him to see a veterinary office that specializes in disorders and diseases of animal eyes. Following his recovery and follow-up with the veterinarian after the surgery, Simon was adopted!

The surgery has allowed Simon to see better so that he can run and play in comfort.

Second Chance Sheridan Cat Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The grant funding was used to cover medical expenses for Quinn’s enucleation.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This funding allowed us to schedule and pay for Quinn’s enucleation. We might not have been able to afford the procedure without the generous grant funding.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Quinn came into our care emaciated and with a face full of porcupine quills. Through her exhaustion and pain, she had raised a completely healthy kitten named Harley. Upon intake, Quinn was immediately taken to the vet, where they removed all the quills. One quill had lodged itself into her tear duct, causing major damage and infection to the eye. That eye required removal, and the Petfinder Foundation’s Emergency Medical Grant money allowed us to get Quinn this much-needed procedure.

Though Quinn still generally distrusts people, she is coming out of her shell more and more each day. She has joined our free-roaming general population, and is frequently seen goofing off late at night when there are fewer people at our facility. Quinn was even reunited with an old friend of hers, a male cat named Joaquin, with whom she was seen roaming during her stray days. Quinn and Joaquin can often be found sharing the same hiding spots during the day. Quinn is still waiting to find her forever home; you can meet her here.

On the surface, the Petfinder Foundation’s Emergency Medical Grant funding provided Quinn with much-needed emergency medical care. But in the end, it provided so much more. Thanks to this vital aid, Quinn now has a second chance at life, love, and happiness. Thank you, Petfinder Foundation!

Animal Authority Rescue Team: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Dual total ear canal ablation (TECA)

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This helped us towards a $4,400 surgery for a young dog in extreme pain. This has made this girl very happy. We have some training to do now with her before placing her up for adoption. She is living at the founder’s home under her care.

How many pets did this grant help?

One

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Chance was surrendered to the shelter with “cauliflower” growths protruding out of both her ears. She was a sweet and pleasant girl despite the pain she was in. The Petfinder Foundation emergency medical grant of $1,000 helped us in great way towards the cost of her treatment, and with fundraising for the rest, we were able to get her surgery done within a month of her rescue from the shelter. She may be deaf, but she is happy and pain-free. We have some training to do with her in regards to small-dog assertiveness, but we have her in training and will place her up for adoption when we know she is ready. The first four photos were taken yesterday; the last four show her before her treatment.

Last Chance Arkansas: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

A puppy, Athena, was brought into our rescue on Nov. 12, 2019, after someone found her on the side of the interstate, where she had been hit by a vehicle. Her injuries were severe, requiring veterinary care and the amputation of her leg, with medical bills of more than $1,300. Today, thanks to help from the Petfinder Foundation, Athena is a happy, active and healthy tripedal dog who hasn’t let her injury slow her down.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Thanks to the grant from the Petfinder Foundation, we were able to pay our veterinarian for Athena’s medical expenses.

How many pets did this grant help?

One

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Thanks to a grant from the Petfinder Foundation, Athena, a puppy rescued by Last Chance Arkansas, was provided the necessary vetting and received medical care that saved her life. She was brought into our rescue on Nov. 12, 2019, after being found by the interstate. Even though she was severely injured, and her right front leg had to be amputated, she is, today, a happy and healthy pup. After a period of recuperation, she is now being trained by inmates at an Arkansas Department of Corrections facility in the Paws in Prison obedience program. She will graduate with an AKC Canine Good Citizen Obedience Certification on Feb. 24, 2019. She is currently listed as adoptable on Petfinder. You can meet her here.

Peak Lab Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Veterinary care and surgical expenses for Tuffy.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

As the largest foster-based dog rescue in North Carolina, Peak Lab Rescue feels a responsibility to save dogs with illnesses and injuries that other smaller rescues cannot. We depend on financial support from generous funders like the Petfinder Foundation to help us continue this important work. We could not afford to treat costly emergency cases like Tuffy without your help!

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Tuffy was tearfully surrendered by his family at a small, rural North Carolina shelter for euthanasia after he was struck by a car. The family did not have the financial resources to cover the expensive treatment that Tuffy required.

Unfortunately, X-rays revealed that Tuffy had two fractures of his right rear leg and a crushed pelvis that would never be able to support his femur, even if his leg was repaired. The best course of treatment was amputation.

Tuffy’s surgery and recovery were both successful. Best of all, Tuffy was adopted by a family who had recently lost their young tripod Lab to a sudden, unexpected illness. His new mom, Jessy, reports, “I’m so happy and sad at the same time. I adopted Tuffy after losing my special dog, Pickles. Tuffy is much different, maybe even the exact opposite, but he brings so much joy to my life and has helped me heal.”

In addition to Tuffy’s orthopedic expense, he required neutering and heartworm treatment. Tuffy has rebounded from all his medical procedures and is now living his best life. Now that’s a happy tail!

Grey Face Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The Emergency Medical Grant of $920 awarded to Grey Face Rescue was used to support payment for double tibial-plateau-leveling osteotomy surgery on one of our senior rescues, Cara, a 9-year-old yellow Lab.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant allowed us to say “YES” to a senior dog in need. Cara’s double TPLO surgery came at a time when Grey Face Rescue was experiencing a high number of emergency medical cases. Because Cara’s need was not deemed an emergency, she had to wait longer than initially anticipated to receive her surgery. Because of this grant, we were able to move forward in helping Cara while still supporting other senior pets in need.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Cara is a sweet, goofy, 9-year-old Lab who is young at heart. She came in to rescue with a limp and it was later determined that she had torn ligaments in both of her hind legs. Not only was this condition painful for Cara to live with, but it held her back from living her best Lab life with her foster siblings. When the option for a double TPLO surgery to address Cara’s condition came to the table, our board of directors immediately wanted to move forward. Cara’s foster parents, Ashlei and Blake, were on board to help her through her recovery. They went so far as to rearrange their home and relocate their main living area to their basement so Cara would not have to deal with stairs post-surgery. Cara had surgery in early November and has recovered like a champ! She can now properly “sit” and “lie down” with ease and no pain. She is able to be her true, goofy self and live the life she deserves. The best part of the story? Cara’s foster parents are now her FOREVER parents! Ashlei and Blake have officially adopted Cara into their pack of Labs. The whole family is looking forward to when Cara is at the off-leash stage of her recovery so she can truly enjoy a Minnesota winter and play in the snow!