Emergency Medical Grant

Little Lotus Rescue & Sanctuary: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The money was used on a lifesaving endoscopic procedure to open Mila’s esophagus.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Mila would not be alive today without the help of the Petfinder Foundation’s Emergency Medical Grant. Mila needed an immediate endoscopic procedure in order for her to ever be able to eat or drink again.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Mila might be one of the most fantastic creatures you have ever met! Mila was surrendered to the Sierra Vista Animal Shelter at 3 months old. She was immediately tested, and found positive, for parvo. The shelter contacted Little Lotus Rescue and asked if we could take her.

Mila had a terrible run with parvo, requiring overnight care and constant monitoring, but she is a strong girl and she made it. After recovering from parvo, she regurgitated and/or vomited with every meal. Through this, she received multiple blood transfusions and various diagnostics before she was ultimately diagnosed with a throat stricture.

She was successfully managed until an incident in which she ate something that she could not swallow, leading to a blockage. We and she has worked too hard for this to be the end of her incredible story. She was admitted to the hospital, where x-rays were taken and sent for consultation to clarify images. The vet recommended a scope to remove the blockage safely.

Today, Mila is living her VERY best life with her new family.

Ready for Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

All of the funding was put towards emergency surgery for Salem, a Russian blue cat rescued from the Animal Care Centers of New York City. He had a fast-moving eye infection and required an immediate enucleation of one eye and restorative surgery on the other.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Salem needed emergency eye surgery due to a serious and aggressive eye infection. He needed to have an eye removed and a procedure to save the other eye.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Salem was rescued from the Animal Care Centers of New York City and placed into a foster home. Two days later, he stopped eating and, on the recommendation of a vet, he was taken to an E.R. for diagnostics. He had a latent upper-respiratory infection and an eye infection. He was treated with antibiotics and seemed to be getting better. But over the course of 48 hours, the eye got really bad.

He was rushed to the vet, who again said he needed the E.R. He was seen by an ophthalmologist, who determined that one eye was beyond repair and need to be removed and the other would need a graft to keep it functional. It was a heartbreaking turn of events for this incredibly sweet cat who, despite all his discomfort, purrs and solicits attention. This was also an unexpected expense that, because of all the other animals with extensive medical needs, we desperately needed help with.

Salem recovered amazingly well. Once his eye healed, he was adopted by a wonderful family. He’s doing great.

Santa Rosa County Animal Services: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The funding was used towards a medical procedure for one of our kittens. This is a surgery we could not have provided without assistance. Thanks in particular to the Petfinder Foundation, we were able to do major surgery on a kitten to save her life!

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant was able to help one of our pets to have a major surgery. This was a big assist to our organization, as we could not have paid for the surgery without help. This allowed us to give top-tier care to a pet while she was in our care.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Cleo was the recipient of this procedure. She was found when she was about 3 weeks old, outside with her siblings and mom. We soon realized she needed further medical care and she was sent to a specialist.

It was determined that Cleo needed to have surgery to treat a persistent right aortic arch, a congenital abnormality of the blood vessels of the heart that can affect esophageal function. It is not very common in cats. One of the branches of the aorta was wrapped around her esophagus.

We were able to pay for this with donations as well as the shelter’s funds and the Petfinder Foundation grant.

During Cleo’s recovery care, her foster mom fell in love and has since adopted Cleo. She is now leading a happy and healthy life!

Franklin County Humane Society: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Emergency surgery for Pepper the puppy.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

See below.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Pepper, a 12-week-old puppy, was brought to our shelter by a mother and daughter. The 6-year-old daughter had been playing near a creek when she surprised her mother by climbing up from the creek with a puppy in her arms. The pup was about half the size of the child and the little girl was struggling to keep her balance while cradling the baby. The mother helped the daughter put the puppy gently in the grass.

They both admired the puppy and snuggled it, but quickly realized the dog had something wrong with its back leg or both legs. The daughter wanted to keep and care for the puppy, but the mother knew the animal needed special help.

With great reluctance, the little girl agreed to entrust her sick new friend to the care of our shelter. We honored the little girl’s rescue effort by keeping the name “Pepper,” the same name the girl had given to the puppy.

Our vet partner evaluated the animal and determined that its left hind femur was broken, as was as its iliac crest (pelvis) on the right side. It was determined that in order for the iliac crest to heal, the pup would have to keep pressure off its right side for several weeks. Unfortunately, the left leg was injured and needed to be amputated, which would leave the puppy putting all its weight on — you guessed it — the right side.

We contacted another veterinarian, who reviewed Pepper’s x-rays and agreed to perform a surgery to repair the femur instead of amputating the leg. The surgery was estimated to be more expensive than an amputation. Pepper had already beat so many odds for her survival, including being found by a 6-year-old guardian angel, that we decided to proceed with the surgery.

Pepper underwent surgery on Thursday, June 24, 2021, and the bone was successfully repaired by placing a rod in her leg. Pepper is now resting and waiting for the natural healing process to take over.

This little pup has been sweet, patient, and wonderfully easy to work with through all of her medical treatment. On July 1, Pepper was transferred to a foster home. Her new foster family has fostered more than 200 of our homeless pets in the last eight years. Pepper was surrounded by love, laughter, and wisdom.

After our veterinary partner approved Pepper for adoption, she was adopted in August and is now loving life in her new home.

Paws Animal Shelter: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

This grant was crucial in ensuring that Laney received the medical care she desperately needed.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Laney would not have been able to walk without extreme pain without this surgery. She went from lying around all the time because she was in pain to running around and playing like a normal kitten thanks to this grant and the surgery for which it paid.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Laney, a 7-week-old kitten, was found by a good Samaritan in the community who noticed she was unable to walk normally. She was brought to Paws Animal Shelter, where she was examined by the vet who sees our cats each week. X-rays were taken later that day at his clinic and he diagnosed her as having hip subluxation.

Dr. Cole recommended a femoral head ostectomy for Laney. However, she had to wait several weeks until she was 4 months old and big enough to have this surgery. It was painful for Laney to walk, so she went into foster care right away so she could be carefully monitored and encouraged to eat. Because she was in pain when she walked, she spent most of her time lying around, preferably on one of her foster family member’s laps! They encouraged her to play, and she did enjoy batting at ribbons.

Paws Animal Shelter received an Emergency Medical Grant from the Petfinder Foundation to cover the required surgery for Laney. To minimize disruption and stress for Laney, her foster family agreed to continue fostering her after her surgery. She did very well with this family, which is one of our regular foster families. They take excellent care of everyone they foster.

Laney’s surgery went well, and she was a very cooperative patient, performing all of the required therapy. She stayed with her foster family until she was fully recovered from the surgery and no longer required therapy.

When Laney returned to the shelter, we put her in with kittens who were younger than she was because she was so petite, so they were closer in size to her. We didn’t want kittens who were much larger inadvertently hurting her during normal kitten playing and wrestling.

She was definitely confused in finding herself at the shelter, as she had been with her foster family for so many months. She was around the adult cats at her foster home and got along well with them, so she had no trouble getting along with the other kittens in her room. It took her a little while to get used to everyone at the shelter, but she has now fully adjusted and is a very sweet, loving kitten.

She is definitely a lap cat, undoubtedly because she spent so much time on her foster family members’ laps. The longer she spends at the shelter and the more she recovers the full use of her leg, the more playful she has become. I was at the shelter yesterday and spent quite a bit of time playing with her. She chased one of the fishing-pole toys all over her room. Later, she climbed up on the bench with me and started playing with my hair! It was really sweet.

Though Laney had a rough start in life, it has totally turned around. Her injuries have been fixed thanks to the generous support of the Petfinder Foundation, and she is now well cared-for at Paws Animal Shelter, where she will stay until we find a loving forever home for her.

She is such a sweet, gentle soul that I am confident we will find a family for her this winter. Thank you for the vital role you have played in Laney’s rescue. You can see Laney on Petfinder here.

Fur Fun Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The Emergency Medical Grant of $500 was used to help defray emergency medical expenses incurred by us for Leo, a 7 lb. bichon frise.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant helped our organization pay $7,161 in emergency medical expenses for a dog named Leo. After being run over by a car, Leo was surrendered to our care because his owner could not afford the necessary surgeries to fix his many broken bones.

The surgeries, funded in part by the grant, saved Leo from euthanasia. They were successfully performed. Leo was medically cleared for adoption at his eight-week post-op medical check by the surgeon who performed the surgeries.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

This fall, our rescue got an urgent call from an advanced-care pet hospital. Leo, who had been brought in to the hospital by his owner, had just been run over by a car. Not only did he have one broken bone, he actually had FIVE broken bones!

Leo was facing the need for immediate, multiple surgeries that his owner could not afford. The pet hospital called our rescue right away. They knew we were passionate about caring for dogs with medical needs, AND we had two critical resources for such care. We would pay all of our medical bills (and Leo’s hospital stay would be expensive), plus we also had foster families who were experienced in post-operative care. This would involve restricted activity after surgery and physical therapy to regain mobility.

Fur Fun Rescue said absolutely, we would take over Leo’s care, so he was surrendered to us so that we could save his life. The alternative that day would have been euthanasia.

Two surgeries were performed on little Leo. The first fixed his left elbow and two left pelvic fractures. The next day, the second surgery fixed a right pelvic fracture and right broken hip.

After his surgeries, Leo was placed in the home of one of our experienced foster families. There, for the next eight weeks, he was watched carefully during his recovery and healing. During this time, our foster mom introduced Leo to several of her neighbors who were good friends (and also dog lovers). And as sometimes happens, one of them fell in love with Leo and wanted to adopt him! His adoption was completed on Nov. 20, 2021.

This adopter is a dream come true for both Leo and our rescue. She was no stranger to our rescue. She had previously adopted two other little white fluffy dogs from us. We knew Leo would be going to an excellent home and would be a happy part of his new dog pack.

You can see this in two of the photos we have uploaded: one of Leo in his new dog pack, and one of Leo in his mom’s arms, taken the day his adoption was finalized. While we talked with his new mom about how Leo was adjusting to his new home, Leo just naturally laid his head on her chest! He truly loves his new mom.

Leo’s adopter is special to us for another reason. Last year, her employer held a giveaway contest to benefit local nonprofits. Employees could nominate their favorite charities, and our adopter nominated us. We won a prize of $2,000! This year, the same contest was held again, and our adopter nominated us for a second year in a row. Amazingly, we’ve won another large prize this year, too! How fortunate can a rescue be to have such appreciative adopters who go out of their way to give back to a rescue that has provided them with dogs they love so much!

And now Leo has captured the hearts of his new family. What a lucky dog!

Happy Cats Haven: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Emergency dental care for a cat named Lala.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped us recover the cost of an unexpected emergency dental procedure that Lala needed, as he arrived with severe stomatitis and needed 20 teeth extracted.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Lala arrived at our shelter with such bad stomatitis that his gums were extremely red and bleeding. He was clearly in a lot of pain, so we immediately got him evaluated by our veterinary partner. The vet noted that Lala was in need of a massive emergency dental resulting in a total of 20 teeth being extracted. Lala was immediately out of pain and showing his true, happy-go-lucky self and quickly won over everyone he met. He is now happily in a home with his best buddy and litter mate, Tinkie Winkie!

Connor and Millie's Dog Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Rehab packet post surgery for fractured hip

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Elsie had a severe femur fracture after she was hit by car. The cost for surgery was almost $5,000 and we raised half. Elsie has experienced a long recovery trying to regain use of her leg. It has required three five-visit rehab packages. She is beginning her third round finally able to use the leg more, with increased muscle mass and overall use and stability of the leg. This grant helped cover one whole package of five visits and part of a second package of five visits.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Elsie presented to our local shelter (second photo) with a severe right femur fracture after being hit by a car. The fracture required an orthopedic specialist to save the leg. With Elsie being young (she was just 2 years old), we opted for the surgery instead of amputation.

The surgery was a success; she also required a femoral head osteotomy at the same time. Her recovery and regaining the use of her leg was slow and painful for her, so we had her in rehab, which was an immense help.

Elsie is now in a foster-to-adopt home and beginning her third and final round of rehab. Once that is completed, the vets feel she can be medically cleared for her spay. After her spay, the adoption will be completed.

Feral Change: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

To help cover the emergency medical expense for ear surgery for one of our foster cats.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Kit Kat, one of our fosters, was in need of surgery to remove a polyp from his ear and the grant helped make that possible. It made all the difference to his recovery and he is doing much better.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

My name is Kit Kat. I am a male cat who is about 6 years old. I have big, chubby cheeks and tabby markings on my handsome white undercoat. My birthday is a mystery, just like my beginnings. For the last three years, I roamed outside and had a very nice lady feed and love me. I loved her too, mostly because she fed me. I love food! I’m not a picky eater, probably because of my humble free-range beginnings.

Then one day I started head-tilting; I had a perpetual look of confusion and wonder. Not because I wondered if that nice lady had food for me, but because something was wrong. My balance was off and I felt dizzy. The nice lady contacted Feral Change and they told her to trap me so they could help find out what was causing my troubles. Did I mention I like food? Well, I was baited into a trap and there I was, trapped! I did not know it then, but that was the best thing that ever happened to me.

Those Feral Change people got me a nice temporary foster and then a long-term foster home. That’s where things get interesting, but in a good way! My new foster parents started taking me to a cat doctor. That cat doctor poked around in my ears, did testing, and found that I had a benign polyp growing in my ear.

You may be wondering and yes, they did a CATSCAN on a cat. But I was asleep, so I didn’t even get to laugh. After the CATSCAN, the cat doctor did surgery to remove part of the polyp. I guess the polyp was big, so they didn’t get it all because some of it was too deep in my inner ear. That’s okay though — I’m tough.

Ever since my ear surgery, I’ve been getting medicine. I used to get a lot of snacks with my medicine. I really like food. Did I mention that? Now I don’t get any medicine anymore because the snack medicine worked so well, and the cat doctor did such a good job!

Now my balance is better and I can run and spin around without getting dizzy when my foster dad feeds me. But just when I thought I was done with cat doctors, I had to see another one. This time, they neutered me. Yikes! I know, but now I’m ball-less and flawless, as they say.

After living with my foster parents for about six months while I was seeing those cat doctors, I’m now ready to find my forever home. I’ve gone through quite a transformation in many ways. When I was living outside, I used to never let people pet me, but now I love pets and all the attention I can get. I like to meow just to make sure they hear my demands. When I’m held, I’m happy. When I’m fed, I’m happier. When I’m held and being fed — well I’ve not tried that before, but I bet I would be happiest!

I used to scare my foster parents with these quick alligator-type rolls when I felt like I was losing my balance. Now my balance is much better; I still don’t feel comfortable climbing up on a cat condo, but I do love to jump on the couch and take naps. Thanks to Feral Change, VCA Bay Area Veterinary Specialists, the Petfinder Foundation, and my foster parents, I’m ready to go out and find my forever home. I hope they have snacks!

UPDATE: Kit Kat was just adopted!

Animal Rescue of Tracy: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Amputation of severely damaged leg.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Unexpected medical expenses such as this amputation are a challenge to a small rescue like ours. To have this amazing grant to cover this expense allowed our rescue to help a wonderful mama cat, Zephyr, without jeopardizing our ability to help other deserving cats and dogs.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Zephyr has not been adopted yet. She is still being socialized with her foster, as she came from the streets and is not used to being cared for as an indoor cat — although as a tripod, she can’t return to her previous life; it would not be safe for her. We are sure that, in time, she will learn to trust humans and be adopted into her forever home. You can meet Zephyr here.