Emergency Medical Grant

Little Shelter Animal Rescue and Adoption Center: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The money was used to purchase a splint and a prosthetic for Daisy.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

After getting her prosthetic, Daisy was able to run around and play like other dogs.

How many pets did this grant help?

one

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Daisy is a 4-year-old shih tzu who arrived from the Animal Care Centers of NYC (ACC). Not much was known about her past except that she was found in a basement, abandoned by her owner, severely matted, injured and crying to be saved.

What they found under matted and dirt-caked fur was heartbreaking. Her right paw was missing, leaving only a forelimb with bone exposed. It’s hard to say if this happened due to the constriction of the matted fur or by some other means, but the wound needed immediate treatment. Daisy’s left paw was also badly damaged. There was a chance her left paw could be salvaged, but it required more resources than the shelter had available. That’s when Little Shelter scooped Daisy up and brought her to Huntington.

Daisy needed a custom splint to correct the damage to her left leg and give her more stability. Once her left leg was corrected, she was able to get fitted for a prosthetic for her right leg that allowed her to be able to play with others and live a normal life. The cost for a custom splint and an orthotic was $1900. Little Shelter thanks the Petfinder Foundation for its generous grant, which helped give Daisy the life she deserves. We are happy to report that Daisy has been adopted.

ARF Texas: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The money was used to do corrective surgery on a dog with entropion. This dog had both eyes affected. The surgery was a success and the dog was able to have no long-lasting side effects. She has been adopted.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It afforded us the opportunity to correct this dog’s medical needs.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Truvy is a sweet, loving girl who was rescued from the shelter with a painful eye disorder called entropion. She has Shar Pei in her so her eyelids were rolling in on themselves, causing irritation and swelling (first and second photos). She has had corrective surgery and can now see perfectly! She weighs 45 lbs. and is 12 months old and sweet as pie. She loves every person and dog she has met. She is housebroken and crate-trained and never barks. She craves contact of any kind and will even rub on you like a cat!

Truvy was rescued from our local animal control after her owner surrendered her there. Our local animal control is pretty much a death sentence for owner-surrenders. As for her eyes, the irritation and swelling is especially bad when she first wakes up. Most of the time she will not even open her eyes, so she bumps into things around the house. Her peripheral vision is terrible, so sometimes she jumps if you pet her unexpectedly. She is constantly pawing at her eyes and they are constantly watering.

We got three vets’ opinions, and all three said she needed surgery and most likely would need more than one surgery. Both eyes, and both top and bottom lids, needed to be fixed. Her eyes had sunken in because the top and bottom lids had rolled in so far. She has really blossomed since her surgery; before, her eyesight was extremely limited. She has been adopted.

Save One Soul: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The grant was used to pay for Raina’s initial bill from the emergency room.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Without this grant, we would have struggled considerably to raise enough funds to cover all bills for Raina. This means we would not have been able to take in animals after Raina until the funds were generated. Thanks to the grant, we were able to take in one more dog since Raina.

How many pets did this grant help?

This grant paid for a large portion of Raina’s bill, so it helped two pets (Raina and the dog we were able to take on due to the grant).

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

The grant primarily helped Raina, who was hit by a car. Her initial assessment included road rash, a dislocated hock, and a hip injury. Thanks to the grant, we were able to get laser treatment to help with the road rash, have repeated bandage changes for the hock and hip injury, provide her with medication and supplements to help with arthritis, purchase an orthotic and see a surgical specialist. Raina remains under our care until her injuries are entirely healed.

The second pet who benefited from the grant was Elvis, a 1-year-old beagle who was turned into a shelter with a skin condition. The vet determined that he had bacterial as well as fungal infections and treated them with medication. Elvis also needed to be seen by an ophthalmologist due to a dermoid in his eye. Elvis’ skin looks good now, and his foster is considering adopting him once he is released from vet care.

Cochise Canine Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

To help provide surgery for Madeline, an 8-year-old pug who was hit by a car and severely injured. She has had two surgeries (front leg and hernia) and will be having her third (hip and rear-leg) surgery soon.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The generous Emergency Medical Grant we received from the Petfinder Foundation enabled us to accept another needy, seriously injured animal facing euthanasia into our program.

How many pets did this grant help?

one

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Madeline, an 8- to 10-year-old little pug dog, was found hit by a car. She was taken to the Pinal (Casa Grande) pound, which has no veterinary care on-site. Madeline’s front leg was hanging, completely dislocated, and she had a huge inguinal (abdominal) hernia from the impact of the car. Her rear leg and hip also had been damaged. She languished in pain for several days. Thanks to the Petfinder Foundation’s Emergency Medical Grant, Cochise Canine Rescue was able to pull Madeline, who went to our primary foster home in Phoenix.

Her rear leg and hip will require surgery as soon as her first surgeries have fully healed. We hope the surgery will be completed in September. The total costs for these surgeries will be approximately $3,500.

As soon as Madeline is fully healed, we will be able to post her on Petfinder and find her an ideal loving home!

Frederick County Animal Control: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Funding was used to supplement our medical-care budget.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It helped pay for the cost of enucleation for one of our shelter dogs.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Karma was surrendered to the Frederick County Division of Animal Control and Pet Adoption Center by her owners, who could no longer care for her. Karma, like many surrendered pets, was overwhelmed by the shelter environment. For about four days, she lay flat on the floor of her kennel, visibly shaking and clearly frightened by the unfamiliar surroundings and caretakers. Adding to the challenge of earning her trust was the limited vision she arrived with as a result of glaucoma. Her left eye was enlarged and painful. Despite the compounded issues, we recognized the potential beneath them and chose to place her on a pathway of adoption.

The first step in transforming Karma from a scared, shaking dog was to remedy the glaucoma and make her comfortable. The only option was to perform surgery to remove her left eye completely — a procedure called enucleation. We know that pain affects the behavior of all animals, but we are never certain how they will respond to surgery, treatment, and any associated care. Karma was a perfect patient and healed remarkably well and remarkably fast, mainly because she left the surgery site alone so we had little need to restrict her access to it.

Many of us who work with animals often witness an animal who “gets it.” Those animals seem to understand that we are doing things for their benefit and, in their own way, work with us to accomplish our goal. For Karma, removing her eye also removed the pressure and pain it had been causing her.

Karma is now healed from her surgery and was adopted last week. We had restrictions on her adoption for her benefit, but also for her adoptive family’s. Her lack of vision on her left side meant she would do best in a home without small children. Even adult family members will have to learn not to sneak up on that side, as she is still acclimating to having only one eye and can be startled easily.

The Frederick County Division of Animal Control and Pet Adoption Center is an open-admission, municipal shelter with a limited budget. We are grateful to have a compassionate community and supporters like our auxiliary group, the Frederick Friends of our County Animal Shelter (FFOCAS), that provide resources beyond our given budget to help animals like Karma. We appreciate financial support from national organizations like the Petfinder Foundation, whose donors also supplement our budget and help us help animals like Karma.

New Hope Animal Rescue Center: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The money was used to cover vet bills and aftercare for a special dog named Mariah. She had a large hernia and was going to be euthanized at another shelter. We pulled her just in time and, thanks to the Emergency Medical Grant, we were able to save her.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant paid for surgery for one dog, and now we are able to use the money we would have spent saving another dog or cat who needs us.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Mariah was a senior dog at [an open-admission] shelter who had all the odds against her. Due to a large hernia, she was set to be euthanized. A volunteer saw a post by another volunteer at that shelter pleading for someone to help Mariah. She wrote about how much she deserved to live, how sweet she was and begged for help for her. We responded and quickly pulled her from the shelter. She had a large hernia that had to be fixed. Thanks to the Emergency Medical Grant from the Petfinder Foundation, she had surgery and is now healthy and ready for a forever home! Meet Mariah here.

NMDOG: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

In April 2019, NMDOG received a call from the Gallup-McKinley Humane Society in Grants, NM. They had picked up a young husky who was running with a tether around his neck. He was emaciated and had a severe injury to his right front paw. From the wound, it looked as if he had been caught in a trap. NMDOG named this husky boy Sayre, arranged transport and had him rushed to our veterinarians at Petroglyph Animal Hospital. The money from this grant provided part of the funds necessary to cover the initial cost for Sayre’s medical treatment, which was approximately $2,200 for full amputation of his right front leg.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This Petfinder Foundation Emergency Medical Grant was vital in allowing NMDOG to provide the necessary emergency care to save Sayre’s life. His leg had to be amputated, but his spirit was not broken! Without the amputation surgery, it was likely that SAYRE would have had a decreased quality of life, with a deformed foot that would have greatly affected his mobility.

Grants such as this one from the Petfinder Foundation allow NMDOG to continue to take the most needy, chained dogs in New Mexico. This grant covered approximately 45% of Sayre’s initial medical expenses!

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Sayre is a young husky mix who is great with other fun-loving and playful dogs, walks well on his leash and harness, rides great in the car, and makes friends wherever he goes!!

Sayre came to NMDOG in May of this year, after he was picked up by Gallup-McKinley County Humane Society Animal Control dragging his tether and suffering from a severe injury to his front right leg. The bones were crushed, tissue was missing, the muscles and tendons were mangled, and necrosis and infection had set in. He was completely non-weight-bearing on that leg and needed emergency medical care right away! NMDOG answered the call and secured a ride for Sayre to our vet clinic with a wonderful NMDOG volunteer.

Once Sayre arrived, he immediately stole the hearts of everyone who met him. Our medical team got him stabilized and administered IV pain meds. After x-rays were completed, it was determined that the damage was far too extensive for repair, and amputation surgery was elected. Sayre was also skinny, dirty and matted — but with all of the obstacles stacked against him, he still managed to maintain his infectious smile and fun-loving attitude toward life! After weeks of post-op recovery and rehabilitation, Sayre received a full medical clearance and is now ready to find the home he has always dreamed of: as a treasured member of his family, never to be tethered, chained or subjected to harm again.

Sayre is still available for adoption. A few weeks ago, he was on a trial adoption, but it was determined that Sayre and the resident dog were not a good fit. He wanted to play, play, play, and the resident dog would have none of that! Sayre is currently back in his foster home with his fun-loving husky foster brother! Sayre will do best in a home with another dog or two who love to romp and play! He is good with kids, but older children are preferred due to his energetic zest for life. Sayre loves to dig, so we suggest creating a digging spot or sandbox where he can dig to his little husky heart’s content. Sayre is also super, duper snuggly and has all the love in the world to give. He likes to be brushed, play in the kiddie pool, sleep with his teddy bear, have his ears rubbed and sing the song of his people! Oh, and please don’t tell Sayre he only has three legs — he honestly has no idea!

Sayre is on Petfinder!

A Taste of Heaven Sanctuary, Inc.: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Cherry-eye resolution for Teddy.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Teddy needed a simple eye surgery to improve his adoption prospects. But $300 would have been a drain on our budget for providing ongoing medical care to our existing pets. This grant enabled our organization to save Teddy and provide the surgery he needed, which resulted in his adoption!

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

In March 2019, Teddy was picked up by the local Animal Control as a stray. He had a cherry eye, which deterred any interest in his adoption. The local animal shelter does not provide “cosmetic” medical services, and he was deemed expendable. A Taste of Heaven Sanctuary believed Teddy deserved a full life and it was shameful that no one was interested in him because of a simple cherry eye. Therefore, we rescued him and applied for a grant from the Petfinder Foundation. Thanks to the Petfinder Foundation grant, Teddy’s cherry eye was removed and he was quickly adopted!

Live Love Animal Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Grant funds supported femoral head ostectomy (FHO) surgery and a dental for Louie, a 5- to 6-year-old Pomeranian/terrier mix. These surgeries were necessary to heal old injuries and prepare Louie for adoption.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Louie is one of 80 dogs whom we took into our care during the first week of July as part of our Foster the 4th program, which saves dogs at risk of being euthanized for space when the shelter fills up around the 4th of July. This program has been embraced by our community, and we had a surplus of volunteers to temporarily foster dogs over the holiday period. As a result, our main barrier to further lifesaving was funding for medical care. We are committed to providing the best care for all dogs in our custody, and medical costs for this program were more than $32,000, given the number of dogs like Louie who required surgeries and other non-routine medical care. Dedicated grant funding has a major impact for dogs like Louie, allowing us to schedule his surgery without delays for fundraising. For Louie, that means less time in pain, less time until he is fully healed, and less time until he is ready for adoption. We are very grateful to the Petfinder Foundation for supporting Louie’s surgery and allowing us to give him timely care in preparation for adoption.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Louie came into our local shelter as a stray and was there for almost two months. He was overlooked by adopters because he was quite fearful in the shelter and had some untreated medical problems that tend to be a financial concern for families. In particular, an untreated and unhealed leg injury was causing Louie pain and problems with mobility, and it appeared likely that Louie would require surgery.

We took Louie into our rescue’s care during the first week of July as part of our Foster the 4th program, ensuring that he would be safe over the 4th of July holiday when the shelter is full.

After our trusted veterinarian performed x-rays, we determined that Louie would indeed require a femoral head ostectomy (FHO) surgery in order to properly heal. Removing the femoral head would allow it to regrow, giving his leg an opportunity to heal properly. Louie also needed a dental, which could happen on the same day.

Louie’s surgeries took place this week, and he is currently healing in his foster home while he awaits placement with a permanent adoptive family. He is now toothless, but he’s the same playful, happy pup, and we know he will feel much better in no time. He is in loving hands with an experienced foster family who are helping to promote him for adoption into a permanent home.

Louie is currently listed for adoption here. He is smart, happy, and eager to please. We are excited to find this pup the loving, secure home that he deserves!

Poodle and Pooch Rescue of Florida: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The money from this grant was spent on emergency surgery for one of our special-needs dogs, Biscotti, who had 16 stones blocking his urethra. An emergency cystoscopy and urethrotomy were performed. In addition, Biscotti had severe trauma to his right eye, which required enucleation. The emergency surgery cost $3,050.95 in total, and we used the entire $1,000 grant to contribute to this expense.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The Petfinder Emergency Medical Grant helped Poodle and Pooch Rescue by allowing us to focus on rehabilitating Biscotti emotionally and physically, rather than worrying about the incredibly high medical bills to cover his surgery.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Biscotti has experienced more strife in his seven years than many do in a lifetime. He was thrown out of a car and left to fend for himself in the wild. He was attacked by another dog so viciously, his eye had to be removed. Sixteen stones blocked his urethra, causing excruciating pain. But none of these hardships, brought about by abuse and neglect, changed his core essence. After we gave him the medical care he needed to recover physically, we placed him in a foster home to help rehabilitate him emotionally. Biscotti was adopted by a wonderful couple who understand that senior and special-needs dogs are true gems. They adopted Biscotti in late July and now his life is filled with new adventures such as going to the beach and visiting family. Each day, he is treated kindly and adored.