Emergency Medical Grant

Sacramento Independent Animal Rescuers, Inc.: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Vet care for Mikayla, who was rescued from Coachella Valley City/County Animal Shelter with a severely broken front leg.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant was a huge help for us. It came at a time when we had several very expensive vet bills. In just a month, we had a puppy who needed a leg amputation, a dog who had major complications from his neuter (and was determined to have hemophelia), and Mikayla, who came to us with a complicated front-leg break.

How many pets did this grant help?

This grant helped cover Mikayla’s medical expenses related to her injured leg.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Mikayla was rescue from the Coachella shelter, where she had been for over a month with a severely broken leg. Because she did not get immediate care, her front leg had healed misaligned by the time she came to us. It was determined that she would need an expensive, complicated surgery, or possibly would need to have her leg amputated.

On the scheduled surgery day, the doctor felt that there was no way to actually repair the break, and it had healed enough where he felt she might do okay leaving it as-is, rather than amputate. He suggested we wait another three weeks to see how things continued to heal, which we did.

Upon her final exam, the doctor felt she might do fine leaving the leg. These several visits with the specialist, x-rays, and cast re-wraps all added up, and this grant was able to really help with sweet Mikayla’s care.

Soon after, Mikayla was able to be spayed and found a wonderful adoptive home!

Senior Hearts Rescue and Renewal: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Surgery

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant enabled this senior dog to get a much-needed and very complicated surgery. By having this surgery completed, this dog was able to be available for adoption and he got adopted.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Bobo is a small senior terrier mix who came to us from a West Virginia shelter after he had been surrendered by his owner. He was incredibly medically neglected. He was missing half of his fur. He was underweight. He had a mouth full of rotten and painful teeth. He had an enormous mass on his chest. He also had a mass on his leg which turned out to be a mast-cell tumor.

Our organization did significant medical care prior to his surgery, including bloodwork and more. The Petfinder Foundation grant funded a portion of Bobo’s surgery. He had a chest-mass removal, mast-cell tumor removal, and a major dental surgery.

Once Bobo healed from his surgery and was fully medically renewed, he was placed for adoption. He found an amazing family where he is the center of attention as the “only child” in the home. He has a high quality of life, enjoying long walks as well as nonstop attention from his parents (third photo).

When the Going Gets Ruff Animal Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

It was used to treat Juno, a 4-month-old Great Pyrenese puppy, for emergency twisted-intestine surgery.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It allowed us to replace the funds from our emergency-care account so that we can continue to treat more dogs in emergency situations. It allowed us to keep Juno alive and help find him the perfect forever home!

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Juno was rescued by us from an Alabama rescue. We brought him to Maine and quickly learned that he and every other dog we pulled from that rescue were in really rough shape. They were full of ticks and intestinal parasites and malnourished.

Not long after we got Juno, he got extremely sick. We quickly knew something was wrong. After rushing him to the vet, we found out that his intestines were twisted and nothing could pass through. They had to get him into emergency surgery as quickly as possible.

We didn’t have any time to raise money or even consider where we were going to come up with the funds. It hit us hard, as we are still a very new rescue. Thankfully, Juno made it through surgery and recovered just fine! He is now adopted and living an amazing life. His family loves him and they send us frequent updates!

Cats R Us, Inc.: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The $500 emergency medical grant was used to offset the cost of eye-removal surgery for one of our senior cats.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The eye-removal surgery was very expensive due to cancer found in the cat’s eye. The Petfinder Foundation grant funds helped Cats R Us pay the vet bill for the procedure.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Bonnie Blue was a sweet 10-year-old brown tabby. She developed cancer in her left eye in March 2020. Her eye was removed in early April 2020 and she was moved to a foster home for recovery. Her foster mom fell in love with this little cat and decided to adopt her. Unfortunately, Bonnie Blue passed away peacefully on Aug. 3, 2020. She spent the last months of her life living the good life indoors as a cherished pet.

Pets Bring Joy: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

We used the Emergency Medical Grant money to fund surgical and dental expenses for one of our senior cats, Alfreda. The funds paid for a comprehensive cleaning for her periodontal disease (level 2), removal of her oral tumor, an abdominal exam with x-rays, and a supply of medications (prednisalone and metronidazole) needed to treat her gastrointestinal issues.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The mission of Pets Bring Joy (PBJ), a 501(c)(3) organization, is to provide a safe harbor for at-risk homeless animals in the greater Washington, D.C., metropolitan area by establishing and supporting a foster community to care for them until loving and permanent homes can be found, and by overseeing a thoughtful and thorough adoption program. PBJ places a priority on rescuing friendly, adoptable senior cats who are at risk in high-volume urban and remote rural shelters because they are often sadly overlooked by adopters in favor of kittens. The Petfinder Foundation Emergency Medical Grant we received covered our medical expenses for rescuing one such animal, allowing us not only to save her, but to redirect existing funds towards helping the many other cats in our care as fosters (82 cats are in our care as fosters as of Aug. 1).

How many pets did this grant help?

The grant funds were used to pay for medical expenses for one cat.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Alfreda is a 10-year-old senior who entered Pets Bring Joy in January 2020. PBJ rescued her from Baltimore County Animal Services, where the shelter vet had noted the following preexisting medical issues: mild periodontal disease, a tumor on her lower gumline, and beginning-stage kidney disease. Upon intake, a PBJ veterinarian further discovered a number of recurring gastrointestinal issues, putting Alfreda at risk of lifelong megacolon.

Thanks to the grant we received from the Petfinder Foundation, we were able to fully fund her dental surgery — including the removal of the (thankfully, benign) tumor — as well as to obtain treatment and medications for her intestinal issues. Because of the excellent care Alfreda received, she recovered from her surgery and her intestinal issues are successfully being managed with the help of medication.

In late July, Alfreda finally had her dream come true: She has officially been adopted! The attached photo of Alfreda in the red chair shows her happily snoozing in her new home. Thank you so much, Petfinder Foundation, for enabling us to help her get well and find her forever family!

Help A Dog Smile: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Surgery to amputate the leg of a puppy.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The $500 grant for Candace meant the money we would have spent on Candace was then allocated to the medical needs of other rescue dogs — so we were able to take in additional medical-needs dogs because of the grant money.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Candace, a corgi mix puppy, came to us with a paw and limb that was ulcerated and twisted. Our vet indicated that the limb would need to be amputated as it had a scabbed ulcer and she would probably continue to open the scab as she grew older and heavier. Candace had surgery to remove the limb and has adapted quite well to being a tripod. She has been adopted and her new family adores her.

Animal Placement Bureau: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

To pay Dr. Schultz for “tightrope” surgery on the cruciate ligament of Dublin, a foster dog.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The total surgery cost was $2,100. At this time we have limited adoptions due to the restrictions in Michigan due to the COVID epidemic; many of our scheduled fundraisers had to be cancelled or postponed indefinitely. This has definitely limited our income and affected our ability to rescue more dogs who need to get out of shelters.

How many pets did this grant help?

One.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Dublin starting limping and was reluctant to walk. This surgery made it possible for him to no longer have pain from using this rear leg so now he is willing to walk without pain medication. After he healed from his surgery, he was adopted.

Clear Creek Cat Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Funds were used for vet care for Anna, a 6-month-old kitty found starving, freezing and hit by a car.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant allowed CCCR to provide the needed surgery for Anna to repair her broken leg.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Anna was a 6-month-old kitten who was found by the road in Alaska in the middle of winter. She had been hit by a car. Her troubles had not begun there. She was starving, dehydrated, and freezing. She was immediately taken to a vet, who believed she was so damaged and depleted that euthanasia was the best option.

Instead, Anna went into foster care, where she was syringe-fed, given subcutaneous fluids, and medicated for her upper-respiratory infection until she was strong enough for surgery. The local vets could offer no option except to amputate the leg. But her radiographs were sent to an excellent surgeon 300 miles away who determined that it might be possible to save her leg.

So Anna’s wonderful foster mom drove 300 miles through snowstorms to transport Anna to the surgeon. Her surgery was successful! After two more long trips to the surgeon to remove the pin from her leg and for check-ups, Anna’s treatment was complete. Today she is able to use her damaged leg with just the slightest limp.

Throughout her entire ordeal, Anna was a gentle, sweet-tempered girl who endured every part of her treatment with purrs. Anna was subsequently adopted and is the beloved member of a great family. She has several kitty friends and is a happy, healthy little girl.

West Columbia Gorge Humane Society: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The grant money received was used to cover emergency dental surgery to wire Skinny Tail’s jaw, as well as the follow-up dental procedure needed to make him healthy and available for adoption.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The emergency medical grant helped West Columbia Gorge Humane Society provide the needed immediate medical care and follow-up care for Skinny Tail. Because his emergency veterinary care was covered by the grant, it allowed our organization to take in other medically needy animals.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Skinny Tail came into our care as a stray on Feb. 18, 2020. During his stray intake exam, we realized that he was severely injured. We rushed him to our veterinary partners, who diagnosed him with multiple broken teeth and a jaw that was fractured in multiple places from trauma from being hit with a blunt object.

Skinny Tail was in need of multiple surgeries. The first surgery was to remove the displaced teeth, wire his jaw and place a feeding tube. After six weeks in a foster home, he was healthy enough to undergo a second dental surgery in which his feeding tube and broken teeth were removed. As SkinnyTail was recovering from his second procedure, he suffered a terrible allergic reaction to an antibiotic, which prolonged his recovery for another five weeks.

We are happy to report that Skinny Tail made a full recovery and was adopted on June 23, 2020, by the wonderful patron who found him as a stray back in February.

Cherished Tails Senior Sanctuary: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

We utilized the funds to provide follow-up care for Faust, who was ehrlichia-positive and severely anemic. He was diagnosed with hypoalbuminemia resulting in early renal disease, likely as a result of starvation and the other conditions.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Faust received additional diagnostics (bloodwork and ultrasound) to determine if the condition was treatable (it was!). The food changes and meds are improving his condition dramatically and he was well enough to get neutered about six weeks ago

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Faust came to us from the shelter as an urgent medical case due to his severe and life-threatening condition. He was bloated despite being extremely emaciated (he received a Body Condition Score of 1 out of 9) because his kidneys were not functioning properly. He initially had a very guarded prognosis from our vet, but we felt that he needed a chance at whatever life he could have.

We aggressively treated each condition identified, and a few weeks after Faust came into rescue, we could see that there might be hope as he was gaining weight, the bloat was decreasing gradually, and his energy had increased. We could see him transforming into a “normal” puppy right before our eyes. He started playing and seeking out attention and affection from his medical foster. We knew at this point that he was going to survive, but it was still uncertain how much permanent damage had been done.

Fast forward two months. We moved him to one of our longer-term fosters and continued his food and medication protocol. We were so pleased that his numbers just continued to improve. In April, he was healthy enough to get neutered and came through surgery like a champ. In May he was adopted by his second foster and became a permanent member of the family, and is spending the summer in Colorado living the dream. Their vet is optimistic that he will recover completely and will live a long and happy life.