Emergency Medical Grant

Outcast Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The grant funds were used to pay for part of Gesa’s hospital stay.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The medical expenses for Gesa were in excess of $6,000. This grant helped us to pay some of the expense fairly quickly.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

In September we saw a video floating around Facebook of a senior gal at a shelter who was clearly suffering. We immediately put out a request for a foster. Gesa, meaning strength and power, was brought to our emergency vet, where she was placed in isolation to be examined. As we suspected, she had pneumonia, but we didn’t expect it was going to be as bad as it was. She had bilateral pneumonia in both lungs and all fields. Her little body was filled with scars and it appeared she’d recently had a litter of pups.

The severe case of pneumonia had developed after she acquired an upper-respiratory infection at the shelter. She spent days in the hospital, dependent on oxygen. After several weeks of antibiotics, nebulizer treatments and rest, we are happy to say that she has fully recovered. She is now in search of her forever home. If you are looking for a middle-aged (7- to 8-year-old) love who enjoys the company of people and other dogs and would do anything for treats, check out our chocolate diva. She will melt your heart like a sweet Hershey’s kiss. Meet Gesa here.

Tri-County Animal Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Money for this grant was used for Kariann’s amputation surgery and rehabilitation.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

She has made a full recovery and is living her best life! She was adopted one month later to a loving home!

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Kariann is a 3-year-old poodle who has seen the worst and survived. She came to us from China through the Yulin Dog Meat Festival, saved from a meat truck where she was so packed in with other dogs that she broke her leg. When we received her, she was completely bald, covered with scabs and very malnourished. Her leg was shattered in two places and, after several consultations, we were told it had to be removed. We removed her leg thanks to your grant and now she is a happy, loving normal dog! One of our volunteers fell in love with her and she has been adopted.

I Heart Dogs Rescue and Animal Haven: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The Petfinder Foundation’s Emergency Medical Grant award was applied towards Ruthie’s surgeries on her legs. Her medical-care costs were estimated to be $2,500, which included multiple surgeries and follow-up care.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Through generous donations and the Petfinder Foundation grant, we were able to afford the medical care necessary to get Ruthie healthy again.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Ruthie came to us as a pull from a nearby municipal shelter in Detroit, where a good Samaritan turned her in after finding her alone, emaciated, and with two broken rear legs. Once Ruthie was released from her initial surgery, she went into a short-term foster with a volunteer of ours who frequently fosters for us. Not long after, a more permanent foster family inquired about her. Ruthie’s sweet and playful puppy antics seemed to immediately win over the family and their dog. After a few more follow-up appointments and positive recovery progress with the vet, Ruthie’s foster family “failed” and wanted to adopt her, making her a permanent family member. Despite all the pain Ruthie endured, she has shown to be a resilient, loving, happy puppy who got the happily ever after she deserves.

Boxer Luv Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Intensive-care medical expenses

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We needed to provide intensive care for our rescue Cotton. She required about 10 days in the ICU before transfer to foster care. The $1,000 grant was applied directly to those expenses.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We pulled Cotton from Pima Animal Care Center in Tucson, AZ, which would have had to euthanize her due to her multiple medical problems. We are the only boxer rescue in Arizona, and without our help, she was going to be put down. She was found with BB pellets in on her left chest/thorax area; bark/shock collar burning and scarring under her neck; and terribly thin at only 38 lbs. Her face was red and hot to the touch. Cotton was brought in to the rescue and given a chance because there was a light in her eyes and she has a fighting spirit that wants to live. Her eyes were absolutely pleading with us to give her a chance.

She was immediately brought to a vet and developed labored breathing, was very uncomfortable, and showed signs that something serious was going on. She required immediate transfer to an emergency veterinary facility, where she received oxygen therapy related to aspiration pneumonia. She has a problem in her esophagus which will be scoped when she is stable. At the current time, she is unable to eat and has aspirated more than once. It is anticipated that she will need surgery on her esophagus to allow her to be able to eat. Her other burns and skin issues will also be addressed when she is stable.

She left the hospital, but was then hospitalized in the ICU again after her blood pressure and body temp dropped. A PICC line had to be placed in her femoral artery so that we could provide IV medicinal and fluid support. A normal catheter in a vein could not because of the BP loss and consistency of her blood. Additionally, she continued to lose significant weight (which she didn’t have to lose), had very little strength left (struggles to get up and would stumble and fall at times). She had no – zero – muscle mass. While her spirit is still loving it is not nearly as strong, she is clearly very tired.

We met with her medical team which includes the hospitals Medical Director and several specialists. We know she has a systemic Neuro Muscular Disorder. We know she has an immune-system issue. We know that she won’t be able to use her tongue or throat again due to the nerve damage and that she will have to continue to live on nutrition and hydration through the use of her surgically implanted gastrotomy feeding tube. We know that she’ll always be at risk of aspiration pneumonia (she just survived a bad battle with that a month ago). We also now know there’s nothing more that we can do for her. We’ve spent a fortune trying to figure her out and find long term, reasonable answers. She’s deserved every bit of it but, in the end, we’ve exhausted it all. We will lose her.

We moved her back to her amazing foster mom’s home. She loves being home and, with the help of some added steroids, got a bit of a physical and emotional boost over the weekend. This is where she needs to be until she lets us know its time. BLR, and Cotton especially, are blessed with a foster mom that is not only deeply committed to her but is also a certified veterinary technician. She’s got the medical expertise at her side, at all times.

On September 27, 2019 we made the decision to let her go. It was been worth every penny to give her a shot. We’ll never ask, “what if…..” Thank you for that amazing gift – to us, her doctors and especially her!

Cats Are Us: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Alice was found underneath a dumpster and rescued through the work of volunteers. Alice was taken to a local veterinarian in Clarksville, Tennessee, where it was determined that both eyes were infected and she was blind in one eye. Alice was given eye medications in hope of clearing the infection and saving her vision in the other eye. She was referred to an ophthalmology specialist in Nashville, where she was seen on May 23. The specialist concluded that Alice cannot see out of either eye and the diagnosis is ocular lesions with infection in both eyes. The specialist recommended surgery to remove both eyes immediately. The overriding concerns were pain and the possibility of infection spreading to the brain. The cost of the surgery was $1,861. This Petfinder Foundation Emergency Medical Grant was used toward the cost of Alice’s medical care, including her enucleation surgery to remove both eyes.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped Cats Are Us save the life of this remarkable kitten. Our organization was helped tremendously by the amount of this grant given the amount of medical expense incurred to save Alice’s life. Your grant allowed Alice to receive the care she needed and allowed Cats Are Us to continue to rescue and adopt other cats using our normal operating funds. We are so grateful to the Petfinder Foundation for awarding this grant to our rescue and to this special kitten.

How many pets did this grant help?

The grant helped one cat with a signficant emergency medical issue.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Alice is now about 5 months old and in good health. She continues to live with amazing foster parents who are also dedicated Cats Are Us volunteers. Not only does Alice have two human beings to watch over her, she also has several foster-cat siblings. Despite losing both eyes to infection, Alice lives a life much like a sighted cat. She eats, sleeps, plays, jumps and interacts with her human and feline friends. Since she doesn’t have vision, Alice uses her other senses to understand her world and communicate with people and other cats. She listens carefully, she tests unfamiliar territory with her paws, and she uses her sense of smell to find food and her cat companions. It is a fascinating and beautiful thing to watch this young cat navigate life without vision. We plan for Alice to remain with her foster family for the foreseeable future. This family loves her and is thrilled to have her in their home.

St. Clair TNR & Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The emergency medical grant was used for a lifesaving surgery to remove a mass from Tessa’s abdomen.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant allowed Tessa to have the second surgery she needed while in our care at less than four months of age. She had what was described as a mass in her abdomen, and we were told she had little time.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Tessa came into our care after being hit by a car. She had a surgery to repair damages, and we thought she was on the road to recovery. A short while into her stay at her foster home, her foster mom noticed what we believed to be swelling in her abdomen. The foster mom was told by the vet who had performed Tessa’s first surgery that it was just swelling, and that she should hold a cool compress on Tessa’s abdomen.

A couple of days later, the foster mom took Tessa to get a second opinion. This vet put her on an antibiotic for the “swelling.” When she was not getting better, we decided it was time for a third opinion. This vet did an ultrasound and knew there was something in Tessa’s abdomen that needed immediate attention. She was rushed to the emergency vet clinic and had the large mass in her abdomen removed.

This poor girl endured so much in her first few months of life! Her foster mom nursed her back to health. During this time, Tessa bonded with foster sister, Harper. Harper was recovering from paralysis (we still do not know what caused the paralysis). The girls have since been adopted together and are living their best lives with their new mom and dad along with their new feline siblings! Thanks to the Petfinder Foundation for helping us give Tessa a second chance at life!

St. Clair TNR & Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

We used this grant for Sierra’s lifesaving surgery at Animal Emergency Center. She needed an emergency spay.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant allowed Sierra to have a lifesaving surgery that was very unexpected. She has since recovered and has been given a second chance at life. She is looking for her forever home.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Sierra was a pregnant mama taken into our rescue in the prime of kitten season. This poor young girl was already pregnant. When she started giving birth, her foster mom knew she needed assistance, as her babies did not survive. The vet suggest an emergency spay to save her life. Thankfully, Sierra made it through the surgery and healed quickly. Right now she is searching for her forever home. After her ordeal, she knows she deserves to be spoiled by a forever family. Meet Sierra here.

Little Shelter Animal Rescue and Adoption Center: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The money was used to purchase a splint and a prosthetic for Daisy.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

After getting her prosthetic, Daisy was able to run around and play like other dogs.

How many pets did this grant help?

one

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Daisy is a 4-year-old shih tzu who arrived from the Animal Care Centers of NYC (ACC). Not much was known about her past except that she was found in a basement, abandoned by her owner, severely matted, injured and crying to be saved.

What they found under matted and dirt-caked fur was heartbreaking. Her right paw was missing, leaving only a forelimb with bone exposed. It’s hard to say if this happened due to the constriction of the matted fur or by some other means, but the wound needed immediate treatment. Daisy’s left paw was also badly damaged. There was a chance her left paw could be salvaged, but it required more resources than the shelter had available. That’s when Little Shelter scooped Daisy up and brought her to Huntington.

Daisy needed a custom splint to correct the damage to her left leg and give her more stability. Once her left leg was corrected, she was able to get fitted for a prosthetic for her right leg that allowed her to be able to play with others and live a normal life. The cost for a custom splint and an orthotic was $1900. Little Shelter thanks the Petfinder Foundation for its generous grant, which helped give Daisy the life she deserves. We are happy to report that Daisy has been adopted.

ARF Texas: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The money was used to do corrective surgery on a dog with entropion. This dog had both eyes affected. The surgery was a success and the dog was able to have no long-lasting side effects. She has been adopted.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It afforded us the opportunity to correct this dog’s medical needs.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Truvy is a sweet, loving girl who was rescued from the shelter with a painful eye disorder called entropion. She has Shar Pei in her so her eyelids were rolling in on themselves, causing irritation and swelling (first and second photos). She has had corrective surgery and can now see perfectly! She weighs 45 lbs. and is 12 months old and sweet as pie. She loves every person and dog she has met. She is housebroken and crate-trained and never barks. She craves contact of any kind and will even rub on you like a cat!

Truvy was rescued from our local animal control after her owner surrendered her there. Our local animal control is pretty much a death sentence for owner-surrenders. As for her eyes, the irritation and swelling is especially bad when she first wakes up. Most of the time she will not even open her eyes, so she bumps into things around the house. Her peripheral vision is terrible, so sometimes she jumps if you pet her unexpectedly. She is constantly pawing at her eyes and they are constantly watering.

We got three vets’ opinions, and all three said she needed surgery and most likely would need more than one surgery. Both eyes, and both top and bottom lids, needed to be fixed. Her eyes had sunken in because the top and bottom lids had rolled in so far. She has really blossomed since her surgery; before, her eyesight was extremely limited. She has been adopted.

Save One Soul: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The grant was used to pay for Raina’s initial bill from the emergency room. Raina had been hit by a car. Her initial assessment included road rash, a dislocated hock, and a hip injury. Thanks to the grant, we were able to get laser treatment to help with the road rash, have repeated bandage changes for the hock and hip injury, provide her with medication and supplements to help with arthritis, purchase an orthotic and see a surgical specialist. Raina remains under our care until her injuries are entirely healed.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Without this grant, we would have struggled considerably to raise enough funds to cover all bills for Raina. This means we would not have been able to take in animals after Raina until the funds were generated. Thanks to the grant, we were able to take in one more dog since Raina.

How many pets did this grant help?

This grant paid for a large portion of Raina’s bill, so it helped two pets (Raina and the dog we were able to take on due to the grant).

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

On May 14, 2019, we were contacted by one of our local veterinary hospitals about a 2-year-old female Lab mix who had been hit by a car three days earlier. The dog’s injuries included several deep flesh wounds on both hips, a fractured pelvis, a broken ankle, and severe road rash. The dog was also flea-ridden and had never received any vaccinations, as the owner could not afford even basic care. Fortunately, the owner was willing to sign the dog over to our rescue. Her emergency-room bill alone was over $1,600.

We agreed to take the case on and named the dog Raina (for Queen). Raina had to stay at the emergency room for at least one more day, until the IVs could be removed and she was able to eat again on her own. We then transferred care to our regular vet, who has been doing a number of bandage changes, re-casting of the leg, suture closure, and laser treatment of the road rash. Raina has a long way to go: The treatment for Raina’s injuries is expected to continue for at least four more weeks.

In the meantime, we are also getting her up-to-date on her vaccinations, and on flea and heartworm preventive. When she’s ready, we will also get her spayed before making her available for adoption.

Raina is in foster care, where she is getting spoiled. It was her foster who picked her name, and she did so because she was going to treat Raina as the queen that she is. Raina has already progressed from being sad and scared at the emergency hospital to a smiling dog. She is feeling much better already, and we will do all we can to get her well.

The second pet who benefited from the grant was Elvis, a 1-year-old beagle who was turned into a shelter with a skin condition. The vet determined that he had bacterial as well as fungal infections and treated them with medication. Elvis also needed to be seen by an ophthalmologist due to a dermoid in his eye. Elvis’ skin looks good now, and his foster is considering adopting him once he is released from vet care.