Emergency Medical Grant

Clear Creek Cat Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Funds were used for vet care for Anna, a 6-month-old kitty found starving, freezing and hit by a car.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant allowed CCCR to provide the needed surgery for Anna to repair her broken leg.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Anna was a 6-month-old kitten who was found by the road in Alaska in the middle of winter. She had been hit by a car. Her troubles had not begun there. She was starving, dehydrated, and freezing. She was immediately taken to a vet, who believed she was so damaged and depleted that euthanasia was the best option.

Instead, Anna went into foster care, where she was syringe-fed, given subcutaneous fluids, and medicated for her upper-respiratory infection until she was strong enough for surgery. The local vets could offer no option except to amputate the leg. But her radiographs were sent to an excellent surgeon 300 miles away who determined that it might be possible to save her leg.

So Anna’s wonderful foster mom drove 300 miles through snowstorms to transport Anna to the surgeon. Her surgery was successful! After two more long trips to the surgeon to remove the pin from her leg and for check-ups, Anna’s treatment was complete. Today she is able to use her damaged leg with just the slightest limp.

Throughout her entire ordeal, Anna was a gentle, sweet-tempered girl who endured every part of her treatment with purrs. Anna was subsequently adopted and is the beloved member of a great family. She has several kitty friends and is a happy, healthy little girl.

West Columbia Gorge Humane Society: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The grant money received was used to cover emergency dental surgery to wire Skinny Tail’s jaw, as well as the follow-up dental procedure needed to make him healthy and available for adoption.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The emergency medical grant helped West Columbia Gorge Humane Society provide the needed immediate medical care and follow-up care for Skinny Tail. Because his emergency veterinary care was covered by the grant, it allowed our organization to take in other medically needy animals.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Skinny Tail came into our care as a stray on Feb. 18, 2020. During his stray intake exam, we realized that he was severely injured. We rushed him to our veterinary partners, who diagnosed him with multiple broken teeth and a jaw that was fractured in multiple places from trauma from being hit with a blunt object.

Skinny Tail was in need of multiple surgeries. The first surgery was to remove the displaced teeth, wire his jaw and place a feeding tube. After six weeks in a foster home, he was healthy enough to undergo a second dental surgery in which his feeding tube and broken teeth were removed. As SkinnyTail was recovering from his second procedure, he suffered a terrible allergic reaction to an antibiotic, which prolonged his recovery for another five weeks.

We are happy to report that Skinny Tail made a full recovery and was adopted on June 23, 2020, by the wonderful patron who found him as a stray back in February.

Cherished Tails Senior Sanctuary: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

We utilized the funds to provide follow-up care for Faust, who was ehrlichia-positive and severely anemic. He was diagnosed with hypoalbuminemia resulting in early renal disease, likely as a result of starvation and the other conditions.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Faust received additional diagnostics (bloodwork and ultrasound) to determine if the condition was treatable (it was!). The food changes and meds are improving his condition dramatically and he was well enough to get neutered about six weeks ago

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Faust came to us from the shelter as an urgent medical case due to his severe and life-threatening condition. He was bloated despite being extremely emaciated (he received a Body Condition Score of 1 out of 9) because his kidneys were not functioning properly. He initially had a very guarded prognosis from our vet, but we felt that he needed a chance at whatever life he could have.

We aggressively treated each condition identified, and a few weeks after Faust came into rescue, we could see that there might be hope as he was gaining weight, the bloat was decreasing gradually, and his energy had increased. We could see him transforming into a “normal” puppy right before our eyes. He started playing and seeking out attention and affection from his medical foster. We knew at this point that he was going to survive, but it was still uncertain how much permanent damage had been done.

Fast forward two months. We moved him to one of our longer-term fosters and continued his food and medication protocol. We were so pleased that his numbers just continued to improve. In April, he was healthy enough to get neutered and came through surgery like a champ. In May he was adopted by his second foster and became a permanent member of the family, and is spending the summer in Colorado living the dream. Their vet is optimistic that he will recover completely and will live a long and happy life.

Cuddle Cat Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The money was used for intravenous fluids, rehabilitation therapy, laser therapy, femoral head and neck ostectomy surgery, and associated pain medications that go along with that procedure.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It helped to defray the significant cost of surgery and aftercare for this cat who came into the rescue in a very injured state, thereby saving money for the rescue to be allocated toward other pets.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Natasha has almost made a complete recovery and is about ready to be placed up for adoption. She came in from a car accident and could not move for about an entire week due to the pain and four pelvic fractures. They also found evidence of birdshot in her radiograph. We had to put her on gabapentin, a powerful morphine derivative, and a fentanyl patch while assist-feeding her and providing subcutaneous fluids twice daily for that entire week.

Natasha started walking around week three and using a normal litter box around week four. It took her nearly four whole weeks to reliably use the litter box due to the pain of assuming the posture needed to urinate or defecate. We provided calming music, birds on a television set, remote laser light and remote viewing to make sure she was recovering correctly, and more to ensure the best point of care.

After her four pelvic fractures healed following the car accident, we got her the FHO surgery she needed to remove the fractured femoral head, since having that left in could result in arthritis for the rest of her life. She still has a slight limp on week 7 of the recovery process, but her condition was really bad so it will take longer. She can now run and climb, working up to jumping. She loves to play with catnip bananas, trackball toys, the cat charmer, and more.

Natasha is currently in foster care for the remainder of her rehabilitation plan. She is being kept in a 150-square-foot room so structured exercise regimens can be followed without overexerting her at this point, until she has made a full recovery. Then she will go up for adoption, in about five weeks. She is a very sweet cat and loves to cuddle. She would never have had the privilege of having this procedure performed without the assistance of the emergency medical grant provided by the Petfinder Foundation.

Friends with Four Paws: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The money was used to pay for Coupe’s surgery to remove a mass on his adrenal gland, in the hope it would help reduce his ailments.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We successfully raised the rest of the needed funds and moved forward with the procedure.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Coupe, who is about 8 years old, was adopted from the Bethany shelter as a youngster and was was returned this year when his owner died. They called and asked us to take him to save him from euthanasia. We took him in, and right away we noticed he wasn’t well. We took him to the vet and learned he had pancreatitis and high kidney enzymes. He was then hospitalized on fluids to treat the pancreatitis and kidney enzymes, and started on the usual medications and special diet. We found a wonderful couple that was willing to adopt him after learning about his medical problems. Then he got sick again, on New Year’s Eve, and we ended up taking him to the E.R., where he spent the night on fluids, again. They also did an ultrasound since the doctor who does ultrasounds was the veterinarian that night. A mass was found on his left adrenal gland. The doctors believed this mass was causing his problems of recurrent pancreatitis as well as his kidney problems and his excessive shaking.

Coupe had the surgery to remove the mass from his adrenal gland in February. The mass was thankfully found to be benign. We have seen improvement in his health since the removal; he has not bounced back to full health like we’d hoped he would, but we are optimistic he will find an adopter soon who can continue to care for and love him despite his health issues.

Second Chance Dog Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Petfinder Foundation Emergency Medical Grant funds were used to provide Leonardo with surgical repair of a large and painful untreated wound upon intake into Second Chance Dog Rescue. Leonardo’s initial veterinary treatment and surgery costs totaled $1,138.91. Grant funds were applied to supplement the cost of surgery as follows: Antech canine wellness and blood-panel diagnostic: $130; laceration repair surgery, anesthesia, IV fluids and catheter: $460.70; medications: $407.41. Additional medications, stitch removal and funds were provided by Second Chance Dog Rescue.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The Petfinder Foundation’s Emergency Medical Grant alleviated a great deal of suffering for Leonardo by providing surgical repair of a serious wound that had been left untreated prior to his arrival at Second Chance Dog Rescue. This surgery was effective in healing Leonardo and helping him find his forever home, where he happily resides today.

How many pets did this grant help?

one

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Leonardo was picked up as a stray by the Los Angeles County Department of Animal Care and Control on Jan. 19, 2020, and brought to the Southeast Area Animal Control Authority (SEAACA) shelter in Downey, CA. On Jan. 25, 2020, a team of volunteers from Second Chance Dog Rescue traveled to SEAACA to intake 18 of the overcrowded facility’s dogs, including Leonardo. At just 12 lbs., Leonardo had an untreated six-inch laceration on his right inguinal area, extending to his abdomen and femur, which required immediate surgery. The Petfinder Foundation Emergency Medical Grant made Leonardo’s veterinary treatment and surgery possible. He was discharged and placed in a Second Chance Dog Rescue foster volunteer’s home on Jan. 27 to recover with crate rest and medication. His foster caretaker reported that Leonardo “blossomed” during his recovery. Once his wound healed and his stitches were removed, Leonardo was posted as available for adoption through Second Chance Dog Rescue and has since found his forever family. Leonardo’s adopters report that Leonardo is “a perfect match” for their family. Leonardo “plays to exhaustion” with his new fur siblings and is doing “fantastically” in every regard.

Colony Cats: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The grant awarded was used exactly as described in the application: to pay for the medical care of a cat named Cindy Lou Who (CLW), who was taken in by Colony Cats in bad shape. She ended up needing several surgeries: Her tail was removed and she had abscesses cut open and drained and debrided twice. She was a wonderful cat throughout the entire process.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant directly allowed us to assist more cats with medical care because it paid for some of CLW’s medical expenses. She was an expensive case right at the beginning of 2020 (with total expenses over $5,000) and a big hit to our medical budget. Right after her, we had a group of kittens with eye issues and at least three had to have one or both eyes removed. Medical expenses can quickly get out of hand when you are a no-kill shelter. Because of COVID-19, we have also had to close our adoption center, and our adoption income has drastically decreased because adoptions are down for the year.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

This grant helped a cat lovingly named Cindy Lou Who (CLW). On Dec. 7, 2019, an injured stray cat was found wandering an apartment complex in a southeast suburb of Columbus, Ohio. When she was found by a resident of the complex, her injuries appeared severe. The resident reached out on social media asking for help but did not follow up with those who replied with suggestions to help. The resident contacted Colony Cats directly via email on Dec. 8, and Colony Cats very quickly went into action to try to find out more about the cat’s situation and if the finder could bring her to the hospital. The finder was busy and not able to bring the injured cat, whom she knew and liked, for help.

Despite describing CLW as being unable to stand, smelling like death, and having fecal matter attached to her, the finder did not reply to emails for over 18 hours, leaving the injured cat outside in the cold with a blanket and maggots on her. Colony Cats stepped in and a volunteer went to the neighborhood, found the injured Cindy Lou Who, and took her directly for emergency care on the morning of Dec. 10. CLW was finally safe, warm and willing to receive help. Below is her timeline of assessment, medical care, and recovery.

Dec. 10-11: CLW has blood work and liver values that are not normal. She is diagnosed with a diaphragmatic hernia and a broken spine at the base of her tail. She does have some feeling in her back legs despite not being able to stand or walk. She cannot control her bladder and it needs to be expressed. Medical staff deduce that CLW must have been hit by a car in the neighborhood where she roamed freely and was an unowned cat. She has maggots in her injuries. CLW knows she is safe and is making biscuits with her front paws in urgent care at the animal hospital. A fundraiser is created by Colony Cats on social media to request donations for her medical care, which is estimated between $1,200-$2,000, depending on how CLW responds to the various treatments.

Dec. 12: CLW has surgery. She cannot eat on her own because of her injuries and is syringe-fed.

Dec. 13: Colony Cats thanks the donors on social media for their support for raising the requested funds and notes that CLW is more awake this day after her surgery.

Dec. 14: CLW eats and urinates on her own without having her bladder expressed. She even gives herself a little bath!

Dec. 16-19: CLW has had a fever for a few days and the source is finally found: She has an abscess hear her tail that is then drained. She begins to rest comfortably again.

Dec. 23-26: The abscess is worse than expected and opens, revealing a very deep wound on CLW’s hind side. Cultures are done and reviewed, and CLW undergoes another surgery on Dec. 26 for debridement of the wound and removal of her beautiful tail. After this surgery, CLW is reported to be continuing to eat and taking her medicines like a champion.

Jan. 13, 2020: CLW is released from the animal hospital, where she has become a staff favorite, into the arms of a loving foster from Colony Cats who will ensure she receives everything she needs to heal and feel loved.

Jan. 20-present: She has continued to heal and her checkup at the animal hospital to get her stitches removed went very well; however, she did have any abscess that needed to be cut and drained. CLW loves to make biscuits. On March 1, CLW was adopted by her new mom, who is also the mother of one of the vet techs who cared so deeply for CLW during her recovery. She continues to drain a little urine, but that should hopefully heal over time. She is very loved in her new forever home!

Crazy Cats Animal Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

With the generous support of the Petfinder Foundation, Crazy Cats Animal Rescue was able to provide urgent surgery for a tiny orphaned kitten, Bravo, to remove his badly ruptured eyes.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant from the Petfinder Foundation covered Bravo’s veterinary evaluation from our general veterinarian as well as from board-certified veterinary ophthalmologists. Funding also covered the eye surgery for Bravo.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Bravo is a tiny kitten who was found in a mall parking lot by a good Samaritan. He was found alone, and with horrible eye infections in both eyes (second and third photos). Crazy Cats Animal Rescue was called to his rescue. We immediately took Bravo to our veterinarian for an exam. Our veterinarian referred Bravo to the Animal Eye Institute to be examined by board-certified veterinary ophthalmologists. Crazy Cats has a volunteer licensed research veterinarian who consults with our rescue and attended Bravo’s appointment with the specialists. We were advised that Bravo’s eyes had ruptured and would need to be removed.

The specialists believe that Bravo has never been able to see and darkness is all he has ever known. His survival is miraculous. He was fostered by the director of Crazy Cats, where he ate well, grew, and was very social. Happily, Bravo was otherwise healthy and had an excellent chance for a great life once the eye surgery was done.

We are so happy to report that Bravo made a full recovery and was happily adopted by a family with experience caring for special-needs cats. They fell in love with Bravo and his story when they found him on Petfinder.com. With gratitude to the Petfinder Foundation, one very special, loving, and spunky kitten’s story is a complete success. The attached photo is Bravo in his forever home.

Rejection Collection Boxer Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

This grant money paid for the medical treatments that Lou needed: Specifically, he had a UTI and this grant paid for analysis and treatment of that; he had a terrible case of worms; he needed surgery to remove three tumors and surgery to remove four rotten teeth. The grant also paid for all costs associated with these procedures, including anesthesia and antibiotics.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped RCBR by allowing us to pay for expensive treatments for Lou that were necessary not only to improve his quality and length of life, but also to increase his chances of adoption. Because of this grant, we were able to use the RCBR funds that would have otherwise been dedicated to Lou’s needs to rescue another dog.

How many pets did this grant help?

One directly (Lou); at least one other dog indirectly (because Lou’s needs were met through this grant, we were able to use the RCBR funds that would have been used for him to rescue another dog).

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Lou came to RCBR as an owner-surrender and the first intake of 2020. His owner had rescued him from an abuse situation and he had lived with her and several other dogs for about five years. Though he was deeply loved, he received minimal to no medical care during this time. His owner became terminally ill and unable to provide for Lou’s needs, including all of the medical concerns that had been building over time. For this reason, Lou was surrendered by his owner to RCBR. His owner was heartbroken, but this was a gift of a new life to Lou!

Lou’s medical needs included removal of four tumors, treatment of a significant urinary-tract infection and terrible case of worms, and significant dental work that included the extraction of four teeth. The Petfinder Foundation Emergency grant was used to meet these needs. Lou’s foster mama with RCBR remembers, “Lou was one of those fosters that you are a little afraid to take on. When he came to us, he was wetting all over the house and when they crated him he would mess and wet in his crate. With his original owners, he would consume the feces and lie in his urine.

“As we found out, he had never been to a vet. Lou had a severe UTI and his system was overwhelmed with worms. He had an odor that was so horrendous that you really had to force yourself to get close to him. Once we vetted him and treated the UTI and worms, we found out the smell was from several abscesses in his mouth and began a course of antibiotics, and everything started to fall into place. This boy had been doing the best he possibly could with the pain he was in. Surprisingly, Lou, although he was in a lot of pain, was never mean. He always was happy to greet you, had a wiggle when you spoke to him and never attempted to be nasty no matter what had to be done to take care of him.

“I think the best part was after the dental when his mouth didn’t hurt anymore. He could eat without having to move the food around in his mouth so that he could swallow it. Lou was the picture of a perfect save, this lovely boy, who hurt so bad but was still sweet, happy, and so grateful for the companionship he so desired. Lou was a success story that a rescue can accomplish: Take a sick dog, correct the problems, show him how to behave in a home situation, and watch the boy blossom. That was Lou.”

Lou had his surgeries on Feb. 17, 2020, healed nicely, and was adopted on Feb. 29, 2020! Not only did he find his forever home with the Gavin family, but he also gained a new fur brother, also from RCBR, who had been adopted by the Gavins earlier that month.

In Lou’s own words (lovingly provided by his new forever mom and dad): “Every night, Hugo and I cuddle with Dad on the couch while Mom plays with yarn and a metal stick thing. But she is making something [with] lots of colors. Anyway, I love it here. My mom and dad and bro are super cool and love me. My other humans like to pet me and give me belly rubs. Sometimes we get treats but not all the time. I really like treats but I think Mom wants to make sure we don’t eat too many at once. Sometimes we lie in the kitchen while Mom and Dad drink brown stuff and talk. Hugo and I lie on their feet to keep them warm. Mom and Dad seem to like that.

“Hey, thanks for reading my story. I sure hope that all the boxers in this world get to have families like mine.”

Thank you, Petfinder Foundation, for your help in getting Lou to his very best forever home and life.

Paws Animal Shelter: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Paws Animal Shelter received an Emergency Medical Grant to cover required surgery for Blue. The veterinarian for our shelter determined that he had a past break which was never treated and did not heal properly. To a layman, it sounds as though his femur was smashed into the hip joint and they fused together. This prohibited normal back-leg movement, and it definitely caused him pain when he walked. He needed a femoral head ostectomy to fix his damaged hip. This surgery was performed on Feb. 19, and the grant money covered a majority of the cost of this surgery.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant made a tremendous difference in the quality of life for Blue, and it made him adoptable (we had multiple people interested in him, but the prospect of paying more than $1,000 for surgery put all of them off). Blue’s surgery went extremely well, and his recovery was everything we could have hoped for. He stayed overnight at the veterinary hospital, and his foster mom picked him up the next day and took him home. He made a remarkable recovery and is running around today and playing like a perfectly healthy young cat. We couldn’t be more pleased that we were able to get this sweet cat the surgery he needed. It has resulted in a complete change in his life.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Paws Animal Shelter received an emergency medical grant to cover required surgery for Blue. He needed a femoral head ostectomy to fix his damaged hip. As Blue was going to require extra care after his surgery, we decided to seek a foster family to care for him. In order to minimize the stress and trauma to Blue, we thought it would be ideal if this family could foster him for a couple of weeks before his surgery, so he would get used to them and their home ahead of time. His foster family took him home on Jan. 24, and his surgery occurred on Feb. 19. This strategy turned out great, as Blue didn’t have the stress of surgery along with stress of a new environment and new people.

Blue’s surgery went extremely well, and his recovery was everything we could have hoped for. He stayed overnight at the veterinary hospital, and his foster mom picked him up the next day and took him home. He had to wear an Elizabethan collar (commonly called a “cone of shame”!) for two weeks, but he did very well with it. He obviously didn’t like it, but he didn’t react as negatively as most cats do. On the 25th of February, his foster mom reported: “He doesn’t like it but is tolerating it much better than I thought he would. His movement improves every day.”

We received another update from his foster mom on March 7, when she wrote: “A picture of Blue’s boo-boo. He’s doing great. The cone is off and he’s a happy boy. He’s been running and playing like nothing has ever happened.”

During this time frame, the sister of Blue’s former mom (his former mom was in hospice care when we took Blue in; she has since passed away) stopped by the shelter to visit Blue. We filled her in on his surgery and the fact that he was in foster care. She gave us more background that explains Blue’s original injury. Blue’s mom rescued him from a neighbor’s house. These people were drug users, and they had an 8-year old son who abused animals. When she witnessed him swinging Blue around by one of his legs, she took Blue and adopted him. She had subsequently noticed him limping but didn’t think he was in pain.

Though Blue’s start in life was certainly awful, it has totally turned around. His injuries have been fixed thanks to the generous support of the Petfinder Foundation, and best of all, his foster family has fallen in love with him and is adopting him. His foster mom told us, “I fell in love with him instantly and he really adjusted well to our home. This picture is before his surgery; he thinks he’s hiding from me. This is a happy ending for Blue and me. I’m thankful for the opportunity to care for such a beautiful gift from God.”

Thanks to a string of caring people, from the woman who initially rescued him, to the people at Paws Animal Shelter who cared for him and investigated his injuries, to the Petfinder Foundation which helped fund his surgery, to the veterinarian and his staff who performed the surgery, and to his wonderful new adoptive family, life has turned around for this sweet young cat. This is why we’re all involved in animal rescue: to help save gentle souls like his!

Attached are multiple photos showing Blue in his foster home (now his forever home!), after his surgery, and with his new family.