Emergency Medical Grant

Friends For Life: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Through this grant from the Petfinder Foundation, we were able to provide Haley with the emergent-eye enucleation surgery that she needed following a dog attack over a french fry.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant saved Haley’s life. Her owner was not able to pay for the surgery and considered euthanasia. In a heart-wrenching decision, the owners surrendered Haley to Friends For Life for a second chance at life. Today, Haley (renamed Tuna) lives in a new home with a yellow Lab whom she adores.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

This is a from Haley’s recent adopter: “It’s been about three weeks since I took Tuna (f.k.a. Haley) home. I want to say thank you to you and the FFL staff, volunteers, and donors. FFL chose to give a partially blind, fully deaf, senior dog a second chance at life through surgery. Not everyone would make that decision. I am so grateful you did. And I am doubly grateful to your behavioral-therapy team for teaching me how to communicate with Tuna. Tuna is such a gift. She is loving, hilarious, and a pro at finding squishy spots in the house for naps with her older brother (who is smitten and happily adjusting to his new shadow). Thank you for all that you for dogs like Tuna and for the people who are lucky enough to love them.”

Pittsylvania Pet Center: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Back in March, our Animal Control received a call about an injured dog. When they arrived, they found Janett. She had a 6-inch prolapsed vagina and part of her bladder was out. Our veterinarian performed emergency surgery to help her. We are happy to say that she is fully recovered and this emergency medical grant covered her treatment.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We are the open-intake shelter for the largest county in the state, and most of our animals are in need of varying levels of medical care upon arrival. The funds from the Petfinder Foundation emergency medical grant enabled us to save this sweet dog’s life and stretch our medical funds to help other animals in need. Thank you to the Petfinder Foundation for the difference you are making supporting shelters like ours and being a true partner in saving the lives of animals in need!

How many pets did this grant help?

One in particular directly, but indirectly at least six other animals were helped by the funds saved.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Meet Janett! This sweet girl was picked up by Animal Control after she was spotted running around with a large mass under her tail. She was immediately taken to the veterinarian, where it was determined that she was suffering from a vaginal prolapse. Vaginal prolapse is a condition seen in intact female dogs in which the tissue of the internal vaginal walls swells and protrudes through the vaginal opening. Upon further inspection, it was found that Janett’s bladder had also prolapsed and she required immediate medical intervention.

The fastest way to treat this condition (and the only way to keep it from reoccurring) was to perform a spay surgery and allow her hormones to decrease. So within a few hours of intake, Janett was taken to surgery. Janett may need another surgery later this week to help keep her bladder in place, so please keep her in your thoughts.

Janett is such a loving, energetic girl! All of the workers at Chatham Animal Clinic love her personality and gentle, playful nature. The Pittsylvania Pet Center strives to give animals like Janett a fair shot at a happy life and a loving, forever home.

Routt County Humane Society: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Funds received were used for Lolo’s radiographs for $87 and to cover a portion of her TPLO surgery, $913. The total grant award was for $1,000.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant award assisted our small shelter with getting Lolo diagnostics and surgery for a cranial cruciate ligament rupture. This allowed Lolo to regain her mobility and decrease her pain. Feeling her best and with her full fun-loving personality on display, she was able to find her forever home in a timely manner. Veterinary care is our largest expense and your grant allowed us to offset some of the expense of her care; therefore, we had funds available to help more animals.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

A wiggly, playful and energetic 4-year-old, 50-lb. pittie mix, Lolo arrived at Routt County Humane Society as a stray in January 2019. Upon examination, it was determined that she had a cranial cruciate ligament rupture (similar to an ACL rupture in humans) and required a triple pelvic osteotomy surgery to repair it and give her the quality of life she deserved. Lolo’s surgery was performed on Feb. 22 by the only board-certified surgeon in our valley.

Lolo was kept comfortable with restricted activity and lots of love and after her surgery she stayed at the shelter for recovery (a 16-week period) before being cleared to find her forever home. Her recovery included kennel rest, passive range-of-motion exercises and, after eight weeks, radiographs to check healing and then slowly increase the length of her exercises and walks.

Lolo was adopted into her forever home in early June 2019! She’s sweet, goofy and so excited to have found her forever home. Lolo will go on daily walks carrying her favorite toys and receive lots of love from her family!

Happy Tails Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Double entropion surgery

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Rocky came to us with blood literally dripping down his face. His only hope was entropion surgery. He got this lifesaving surgery!

How many pets did this grant help?

Rocky

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Rocky came to us with not only severe respiratory and eye infections, but with blood coming from his eyes (first photo) due to the need for double entropion surgery. Rocky has since been adopted and is loved and adored by his new family. Attached is his surgery picture (second photo), a recent photo (third photo) and note from his new mom.

Azalea City Cat Coalition: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

See below.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We are a very small organization and so any medical emergency really affects us financially. This grant was so very helpful. It covered the medical needs of Knox completely.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Knox was a stray picked up with a broken leg — the bone was actually sticking out of his leg. He was taken in by ACCC for emergency care. His leg was removed by Dr. Wilder at Ark Animal Clinic and he is currently rehabbing in a foster home. He will be ready for adoption in about two more months. Although we thought he was very feral, he is actually a lovebug and will make a great three-legged pet for some lucky family!

UPDATE June 17, 2019: Knox has been adopted!

Ada Howe Kent Memorial Shelter, Inc.: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The funds granted were used to subsidize the cost of orthopedic surgery for a 2-year-old rescued chocolate Labrador.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant helped to make it possible to cover the medical expenses associated with Khloe’s surgery. She recovered quite well and was adopted.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Khloe, a 2-year-old chocolate Labrador mix, was rescued from a high[-intake] shelter located in a rural area of Texas. She was slated to be euthanized because of overcrowding at the shelter. A rescue group fell in love with her because of her sweet and disarming personality. When she was transported to Kent Animal Shelter, it was found that she needed bilateral cruciate ligament surgery that would cost in excess of $3,500. The surgery was completed on June 26, 2018. Khloe luckily recovered quite well while in her foster home, which ultimately adopted her.

New Leash on Life USA: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The grant was used to fund the medical care for Shortcake, who initially presented with hind-end ataxia, decreased eye movement, a large mass, a lick granuloma, and vaginal hyperplasia. Shortcake was initially assessed by a veterinarian from Emancipet, who recommended further diagnostics. She was then seen at Philadelphia Animal Hospital, where an immediate spay and mass removal was recommended along with a neurology consult with a suggested MRI. Her spay and mass removal was done at Providence Animal Center. A University of Pennsylvania neurology consult led to an x-ray and recommendation for management and supportive care; at that time, her ataxia was beginning to resolve and it was determined that an MRI was not necessary. Throughout this period, she was also cared for by a licensed veterinary technician to monitor her care closely and ensure that she was being supported.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant allowed us to provide high-quality care for Shortcake and address her many medical concerns. She required care, diagnostics and procedures that would not otherwise have been possible.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Shortcake was initially brought to ACCT Philly by a good Samaritan; unfortunately, she was not in adoptable condition when we met her and required medical treatment. After multiple veterinary visits including a mass removal, x-ray, and neurology exam, Shortcake improved significantly and has been adopted into an amazing home where she is loved and spoiled. She was also able to visit a school for disadvantaged children to share her journey and provide therapeutic support.

Missy’s Haven: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Dole: We were able to begin the treatment of one of his eardrums, with removal to follow upon clearing of the infection.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Dole has been with us for some time but, due to his medical condition with his eardrums, adopters interested lose interest. We are now able to treat his condition.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Dole is a super sweet boy. He had two eardrums that were badly infected, which caused hearing loss. Grant funds received have assisted with his treatment. We are currently still working on 100% removal, since both were badly infected. Since treatment has been started, he has had several inquiries and has two upcoming meet-and-greets with potential adopters. He has even found himself a new buddy.

Washburn County Area Humane Society: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Surgery for tumor removal on a 7-year-old dog

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We were able to get the tumor removed so Rufus could be put up for adoption.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Rufus entered our shelter as a stray on May 18, 2018. He was a super sweet older plott-hound mix. He loved everyone. Rufus kept getting passed up because he liked marking his territory and he had a fatty tumor on his neck. The vet did some blood work on him and discovered he had Lyme disease, so he had to be on treatment for a month to get his blood levels where they should be. When we did follow-up blood work, it was still slightly off, but the vet thought it could be due to the tumor. We did do a needle slide to see if the tumor looked cancerous and it didn’t. At this time we found a foster home for Rufus on Nov. 26, 2018. They loved him even with his accident-prone habits. They did a fantastic job with his medicine and bringing him in for his appointments. The foster family was excited to adopt him once he got the all-clear from the vet. Unfortunately, after his tumor was removed, it was sent off to be tested. It ended up being a very aggressive cancer that moved to his lungs not long after. On Jan. 21, 2019, Rufus was euthanized at the vet’s office in the arms of his loving foster family. They decided it was time when he stopped eating. We were so thankful to them for being able to show him what living in a home with people who love him was like and to stay with him until the very end.

Pawnee County Humane Society, Inc.: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The $119.13 received from the Petfinder Foundation was used to pay for medical care for Blue, an older female blue pit-bull mix: the surgical removal of her left eye and the removal of a large, low-hanging mammary tumor. All funds went to those surgeries (done at once) and were not used for anything else, including routine maintenance.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This organization helped Blue become adoptable and healthy. Blue came in as a stray with a variety of health problems that clearly had gone untreated for years. Without the removal of her eye and tumor, she would have continued suffering. Without these surgeries, adoption would have been less likely and she would have been in great pain and misery.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

This grant helped Blue become adoptable and the surgeries, as previously noted, helped eased her pain and suffering. Blue came in as a stray found within the City of Larned in November of 2018. This was the second time during 2018 that the dog had been found as a stray. The owner had obviously neglected to give Blue proper medical care. Her left eye was bulging out of its socket and was pink. Blue clearly had had a lot of puppies during her life and she also had several mammary tumors, one of which was hanging down pretty far on the left side of the front of her chest. The owner claimed that she was born with both of those conditions and that the vets in Pawnee County had confirmed that. Upon further investigation and discussions with the vets in Pawnee County, this was determined to be false. The dog had not been to the vet for most of her life, if at all.

Dr. Burdett at Larned Vet Clinic told us that Blue was between 8 and 10 years old based on her teeth (which were pretty bad and likely make her appear older than she really is), and said he could remove the big hanging tumor as well as her eye. She was in otherwise good health, happy, heartworm-negative, and friendly to other dogs, cats, and people. The owner did not claim the dog within three days, never called or made any arrangements to get her, and despite her health issues, we determined that she was a good dog worth keeping and adopting out. Although she is a senior dog, she walks and runs really well for a dog who is supposedly 8 years old, and has adjusted to having on one eye. She is now spayed and vaccinated.

Blue is currently in a foster home with four other dogs. Blue has done well in that home with all of the foster’s other dogs. It is difficult to determine, in a shelter environment, how an animal will act in a home. Given that Blue is an older pit-bull mix with one eye, her length of stay was going to be longer anyway. Having her in a foster home has helped us find out more information about her that may not have been known otherwise. We found out that she is housebroken and kennel-trained. She does well with cats, too. Had she not been fostered, we would not have known these traits. Although she has yet to be adopted, the foster works with a few people who are interested in her. She has gone on a few meet-and-greets with others and hopefully she will be adopted soon. Blue is a wonderful dog and, despite her estimated age of eight years old, she is still quite active and playful. She is a really great dog and PCHS is grateful for the medical grant, which helped us offset the costs of her lifesaving surgeries. Meet Blue here.