Emergency Medical Grant

Shenandoah Shepherd Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The money was put towards medical bills for a 9-month-old dog named Mango. He was hit by a car and had several broken limbs. His medical bills mounted to over $10,000, including emergency care, surgery, and physical and water therapy.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped us save Mango, who was moments from being euthanized due to his severe injuries.

How many pets did this grant help?

One: Mango

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

At 9 months old, in search of a scrap of food on the streets of Texas, Mango was hit by a car. Someone saw the accident and witnessed the driver flee. As he scooped up Mango’s bloody body, he called numerous vets, only to be turned away. Finally, he reached Mission Vet, which agreed to assess Mango for free, and so he raced over there. One of the first things done was to scan the puppy for a microchip. Lo and behold, they found one! Mango’s family was immediately called. The staff hoped his family would be terribly worried, but they were wrong. His family calmly explained he was no longer their problem, they had tossed him out three months ago, hung up the phone and went back to their dinner.

Mango was almost put to sleep on the spot, but the vets saw something special in this boy. He had a great will to live, and if given the proper care, could get a second chance for the love he so desperately wanted. Shenandoah Shepherd Rescue was called and given the option: Take this dog into our care, or he would be euthanized. Funds were tight, but we couldn’t let his story end this way, so we committed to doing what we could to save Mango.

Mango had bruised lungs, major blood loss, a terrible elbow fracture, and liver damage and was in shock, but with proper care, he was expected to make a full recovery. His owners may have decided he was worthless, but we were determined to prove them wrong.

Mango was stabilized and had surgery to repair a fractured right elbow and a fracture in his left shoulder. Then he received physical and water therapy and socialization. Once he was strong enough to travel and ready for adoption, he was transported to Virginia. Mango has since been adopted into his forever home. He will always have a little “skip” in his step due to his injury, but otherwise is a happy and healthy 1-1/2-year-old puppy! He has a wonderful dog mom and four-legged sister (fourth photo). They are all loving life together!

Peaceful Passings Senior Animal Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Rehabilitation of our little dachshund named Sapphire. Sapphire’s condition was sad, really sad. Our vets evaluated her and thought they could make a remarkable improvement in her life and lifespan with surgery. Sapphire was a sweet, loving, house-trained, and obviously was someone’s pet, though no one came to claim her at our SPCA — probably because they could not afford her medical care. She had hook and whip worms, which have been addressed with medications. She was anemic and had a high white blood-cell count, but was not in need of a blood transfusion, per our vets (Old Dominion Animal Hospital in Charlottesville, VA). Without surgery, her white blood-cell count would not decrease, so surgery was an absolute necessity. She was scheduled for surgery on Aug. 12, 2018.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Sapphire had her medical needs met and now has been adopted.

How many pets did this grant help?

One – Sapphire

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Sapphire was found as a stray by someone in our local community and taken to our local SPCA. The SPCA contacted us because Sapphire was a senior who needed surgery to remove a mammary mass (third photo) and repair a hernia. By way of a Petfinder Foundation grant, Sapphire was rehabilitated medically and adopted, with her adopter more than willing to accept the costs of her follow-up medical care. Today, Sapphire is a happy dog!

Humane Society of Warren County: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

On Aug. 15, 2018, I submitted a request for an Emergency Medical Grant for a sweet little kitten named Babe. She had come to us as a stray with a terrible eye infection. She had been seen by our supervisory veterinarian three times and treated with different types of antibiotics with no results. Our veterinarian said we had exhausted our medical options and the only answer was enucleation (removal of the eye) before it burst.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The Petfinder Foundation generously awarded our grant request and Babe had her surgery on Aug. 22, 2018, at Helping Hands in Richmond, VA. Back in 2013, the Humane Society of Warren County founded “Olive’s Fund,” which provides advanced medical care for animals in our facility. The funds are provided through grants, fundraising, donors and our community members. We had already paid for two other major surgeries when Babe came along and had exhausted our funds.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Once Babe’s surgery was complete, we shared her story along with her picture, and it wasn’t long before someone came in to meet her. We are so happy to say that on Sept. 1, 2018, Babe was adopted and is now living in the lap of luxury! Thank you, Petfinder Foundation, for making this possible and helping us help Babe!

Herd U Needed a Home: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The money was used to pay for a portion of Mannie’s medical bills to repair his broken leg and prevent him from having to have that leg amputated.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped make it possible for our organization to help Mannie and other dogs like him in need of additional medical care and to pull more dogs from overcrowded shelters in California, Idaho and Oregon.

How many pets did this grant help?

This grant directly helped one pet, but also helped the organization to be able to afford to pull more dogs from overcrowded shelters.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Mannie was the dog who was helped most by this funding. Mannie came to us from an overcrowded shelter in Alturas, Calif., in early July. He is a 3-year-old border collie with an active, outgoing personality. He is very friendly and loves to run and swim. He’s one of those velcro guys who just loves being by your side. We noticed almost right away that he was limping on his back left leg and inquired with the shelter as to whether or not he had an existing injury. The shelter informed us that he had indeed previously had a severely broken leg and that it had been repaired by a local veterinarian.

We took Mannie to our specialist, Dr. Colton, at Central Oregon Animal Hospital to examine Mannie’s leg. Dr. Colton recommended x-rays be taken to get a better look at how the leg had healed after the initial procedure. Dr. Colton was not pleased with what he saw on the x-rays. The repair had not fixed the problem, and Mannie’s leg had not healed properly. Dr. Colton felt that not only was Mannie in pain, but that if he did not undergo corrective surgery to repair the leg, he would likely need to have it amputated.

Mannie is doing well now as he has undergone the corrective surgery as you can see in the second photo showing his pre- and post-surgery x-rays. Dr. Colton (with Mannie in the first photo) says he has a very good prognosis and that he will likely walk and run almost normally once he is completely healed. Most importantly, he will not need to have his leg amputated! Mannie would have been adoptable with three legs, but having four legs makes life much easier for him now and in the future, and ensures that his new family will not bear the burden of having to pay for additional care for Mannie’s leg in the future.

Mannie is now recovering at the Herd U Needed a Home ranch in Paisley, Ore., where he gets to hike and swim every day, helping to build the strength he needs in that recovering leg. He will be available on our Petfinder site soon!

The Cat Network Inc.: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The money was used for veterinary expenses for surgery for Lombardo to remove a tumor from under his shoulder.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The tumor was removed and was found to be benign.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Lombardo was rescued as a kitten by the Cat Network several years ago and was adopted by a woman who passed away in June 2018. Her daughter was forced to return Lombardo (now age 16) to Cat Network because her two cats would not accept a new cat and were aggressive toward him. Shortly after his return, he was found to have a large sore under his left shoulder that appeared to be an abscess. An exam at the vet revealed that the sore was part of a large tumor. The vet did a needle aspiration and was concerned about the cells she saw under the microscope and recommended surgery to remove the tumor. The Cat Network applied for a grant from the Petfinder Foundation Emergency Medical Fund to cover the expenses related to the surgery to remove the tumor.

The surgery was done, and the good news is, the tumor was determined to be benign. There were several stitches required to close the incision, and Lombardo had to be confined to a small cage to limit his activity for several weeks. He seemed depressed during this time and wanted out of the cage, but he was not supposed to be walking around, jumping, or doing normal activities. The incision healed well and Lombardo is now enjoying good health in a Cat Network foster home. He is a very sweet and friendly cat, now free from the pain and discomfort of the tumor. Lombardo is available for adoption. Meet him: http://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/42751989

The photos show Lombardo recently, as well as the incision after the stitches were removed. We are very grateful to the Petfinder Foundation for the grant.

Chicago Canine Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Medical bills for Hero

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant made a significant dent in the large bill we have accrued caring for Hero, a sweet German shepherd pup who was surrendered after being mauled by another dog.

How many pets did this grant help?

One

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Hero is a 4-month-old German shepherd puppy who came to us on June 3 via our shelter diversion program with Chicago Animal Care and Control. He was surrendered by his owners after escaping his yard and being attacked by three large dogs. Hero’s right eye was completely out of its socket, and x-rays at the emergency clinic also revealed a shattered jaw and zygomatic arch. Hero was stabilized in the hospital and released after five days. He has since been fostered by one of his ER nurses, and has done very well. Unfortunately, a follow up CT scan showed that there was a bone fragment that had migrated into the space where his eye was, which was causing infection and needed removal. But his spirit and happy nature made him a fighter, and he came through all his injuries very well. He has required multiple surgeries to address the broken bones in his face and jaw, and is well on his way to being completely healed and has been adopted by his ER nurse!

Cochise Canine Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Medical care for Mini, a dog with cancer. I will list the past two months’ medical expenditures, as well as upcoming expenditures committed to before Oct. 20, 2018. The drugs Mini is taking are a daily “cocktail”: two drugs in the a.m., one drug in the p.m., plus supplements midday, all given with small home-cooked high-protein, low-carb meals.

Morning: Cyclophosphamide – a very low-dose compounded daily chemo drug. This is given with furosemide, also compounded, which helps prevent bladder cysts that can be caused by the chemo
Midday: Vitamin E oil, fish oil, curcumin, probiotics, CBD oil
Evening: Piroxicam – compounded formula. Piroxicam is a strong NSAID with the additional benefit of helping reduce tumors. Piroxicam is often used as a stand-alone drug when an animal cannot tolerate chemo drugs. We are fortunate in that Mini has been on the medications for a month and is tolerating them perfectly.

Mini is scheduled to see Dr. Hershey, her oncologist at IVO, in Phoenix again on Oct. 15 for an ultrasound and X-rays, as well as re-measurement of the tumors to document changes.
Medical costs to date:
AZ Diagnostic Laboratory – pathology: $145.00
All Creatures Veterinary Services: $276.44 (this is only what was not covered under a $750 grant from Paws for Life, which has been totally used)
IVO – Dr. Hershey – first visit: $148.00
Arizona Animal Hospital: $200.00
Diamondback Drugs – compounded medication: $157.85
Reorder of compounded medications: $157.85
Revisit, Dr. Hershey, including ultrasound and X-rays: $318.67
Total medical expenditures: $1561.66

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It enabled Mini to have the ongoing medical care, medicines and testing she requires. As a result, she is doing very well and looking forward to a long time with a wonderful quality of life!

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Mini is doing incredibly well. Three months ago, when Mini first arrived at CCR, she almost died twice: once during her first surgery and once several days later due to systemic sepsis caused by her open, untended, ulcerated mammary tumor. (See photos before and after surgery.) Today, Mini’s bloodwork has gone from extremely anemic and an off-the-charts white count to what would be seen in a dog without cancer, i.e. “normal ranges.”

Unfortunately, due to her long-term neglect by her previous “caregivers,” she is in stage-four cancer — the cancer has spread to several lymph nodes. Given that reality, she is on a daily three-drug protocol which may buy her several years of health and comfort. She will be seeing her local veterinarian monthly for bloodwork sent to the oncologist for review, as well as visits to Dr. Hershey at IVO every two months. Both Dr. Hershey and Dr. Knoblich (the local vet) agree that Mini has at least two years of health and potentially as long as 4-5 years. Given that she is already 11 years old, this will indeed make her an elderly little dog.

Mini has an amazing quality of life. She has integrated herself into the little pack of senior and handicapped dogs. She is active and playful, and if you didn’t know differently, you would think she was a normal, healthy dog. Mini is not up for adoption at this time since she will need several years of ongoing, expensive medical care.

PurrHaven, Inc.: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

To remove the right eye of Hercules to save his life and so he would become an adoptable kitten.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Hercules was adopted to his forever home (along with two of his buddies who went to the same home) on Sept. 10, 2018, two months after his lifesaving surgery.

How many pets did this grant help?

one

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We are so fortunate to have received the Petfinder Foundation Emergency Medical Grant for Hercules, one of 17 kittens from our Sharpsburg Maryland Landing TNR project. Hercules desperately needed his right removed quickly to alleviate his suffering. I applied to your Foundation in July and, within a week, the funds were approved. Hercules barely weighed 2 lbs. when the fabulous staff at Spay Now Laurel performed the surgery. He recovered quickly, and he was adopted to his forever home on this week after we listed him on Petfinder along with his pal Sabrina. Attached is a link to a video his new dad sent us of Hercules playing along with Sabrina and Tabitha, whom we also had listed on Petfinder. We really needed your help to cover this unexpected emergency-medical issue. We are a small organization and I can’t tell you how much your help meant to us. Thank you.
https://youtu.be/isA8nRrHV7wrn

Feline Friends of Ruff Love Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Hospitalization/ICU care

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Kermit’s medical bill would have been a large, unexpected amount that would have been difficult for our small group to cover. We are so grateful to have received the grant and been able to cover his hospital stay at Thomasville Emergency Vet.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

A volunteer stopped at a woman’s house that had more than 30 kittens in the yard. The majority of them were ill with flea infestations and upper-respiratory infections. If left untreated, these infections can lead to painful and disturbing injuries, just as poor Kermit experienced. Our volunteer scooped up the three most urgent cases and feared they would not survive the ride to the vet. Two of the kittens taken from the home passed away at the vet. Kermit is the sole survivor.

Kermit received around-the-clock care and intense antibiotics. Once he was released from the emergency vet about two weeks later, he went into his foster home. Kermit stopped eating about three days after his release and it was determined that his injured eye was causing pain. The vet wanted to delay the eye removal if possible to let his weakened body heal more. However, surgery was needed ASAP. He was put on pain meds and began eating, and surgery was scheduled for his neuter and eye removal.

Kermit came through surgery wonderfully and has flourished in his foster home. He is one of the most affectionate cats his foster family has ever seen. Kermit sleeps on his foster mom every night and purrs constantly. He gets along wonderfully with other animals and will make the purrfect addition to a forever family. Meet him: http://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/42398006

Pope Memorial Humane Society: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

To help a little Chihuahua-mix dog who had been stepped on, her leg severely fractured. The injury required an orthopedic surgeon to place a pin down the center of the bone, a bracket and several permanent screws. After six weeks of confined rest, this young dog was able to be placed in a loving home and has a second chance at a quality life. The Petfinder Foundation grant covered over half of the total vet and surgeon fees.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

More than ever before, we are seeing pets surrendered because owners cannot pay for a needed procedure. The demographics in our area are such that no vet will extend care that is not fully paid for up front. Unfortunately, this means that owners have only the choice of euthanizing their pets or surrendering them. This shelter is the last resort for these pets having a chance at life, literally. The financial burden of any one of these situations takes precious donations away from other areas — medical care, operations, quality food — for the other residents, and so we are incredibly grateful for this award and for the Petfinder Foundation having this program.

How many pets did this grant help?

One super cute one

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Recently we were asked to take a 6-lb. Chihuahua mix named Millie. Her owner had accidentally stepped on her and Millie sustained a compound fracture of one back leg. Her owner could not afford to have it repaired. The break was serious, shearing off the top of her leg bone, and would require a pin, bracket and screws. Off Millie went to the vet and orthopedic surgeon. After six weeks of crate rest with a foster, Millie has been happily adopted by a wonderful person who insists that she is now owned by Millie, not the other way around.

This shelter literally exists because of our donors, and this type of rescue is very costly — in fact, the total cost was close to $2,000. We reached out to the Petfinder Foundation through its Emergency Medical Grant program, and were thrilled when we were awarded $1,000 to help offset the cost. Petfinder.com is already a great partner in finding animals new, loving homes, and now the Petfinder Foundation has directly helped a little dog get a second chance at a happy life. Thank you to our donors, and thank you to the Petfinder Foundation!

PALS Animal Shelter of Lincoln County: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The Petfinder Foundation Emergency Medical Grant award of $1,000 was put towards Jase’s medical bills. His surgery alone cost almost $5,000. PALS is very grateful for the Petfinder Foundation award to assist with these veterinary expenses.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The Petfinder Foundation grant helped with the shelter’s veterinary expenses for Jase, and allowed the shelter to continue to provide veterinary care to other homeless animals who have entered the shelter. PALS receives no government funds and relies solely on private donations. PALS is very appreciative of the financial assistance provided by the Petfinder Foundation to ensure that Jase gets to now lead a happy, healthy life in his forever home. He is one very lucky pup!!

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Jase’s journey began about three months ago when he was rescued and brought to PALS Animal Shelter after being hit by a car and left alone in a ditch, frightened and in tremendous pain. This young sweet 7-lb. Pomeranian was taken by PALS to a specialist, where it was determined that he had a right femoral fracture, right ischial fracture, pelvic fracture, and a femoral fracture. With no identification or microchip and no owner who came forward to claim the poor pup, PALS volunteers and supporters rallied to help Jase (the name he was given by PALS). He required a metal plate, four wires and six screws to repair his right leg and toggle-pin fixation for his hip.

All of PALS volunteers’ and supporters’ love and care, along with Jase’s foster family, helped him become the pup that all dogs deserve to be. Jase loves to play and cuddle, and the best news is that Jase hit the jackpot by finding his forever home. He will be one spoiled pup! Jase thanks PALS supporters, volunteers, Mizzou vets, and the Petfinder Foundation for making this possible. Jase sends doggy hugs and kisses to you all!

Shenandoah Shepherd Rescue (SSR): Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Your generous $1,000 grant was used for medical expenses related to Mango’s surgery: approximately $5,600 for three days of acute care, $4,100 for surgery, plus about $2,000 for boarding in Texas, transport to Virginia, and physical/water therapy in Virginia for several months. All the while he was in a loving and caring foster home.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant enabled SSR to rescue one more dog and give him a chance to have a long, wonderful life, rather than be euthanized because his injuries were too costly to fix.

How many pets did this grant help?

one: Mango

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Mango, a 9-month-old shepherd mix, was hit by a car in Texas and brought in to an emergency vet by a good Samaritan. He was minutes away from being euthanized when a vet there contacted SSR in Virginia and SSR agreed to stabilize him. If they could not find a local rescue, SSR would move forward with his care. At that time, we were quoted $1,000-1,200. The final bill escalated to over $5,000 (not including and additional $4,000+ for surgery done by our regular vet in Texas). It was much more than we had bargained for. He was 9 months old and his prognosis was very good; he would be ready for adoption once he was strong and healthy enough to travel to Virginia.

Once in Virginia, he received physical and water therapy for several months. Mango will always walk with a slight limp, but otherwise is a very happy, healthy, and active puppy (now about 15 months old) who loves the water and his toys! Mango was adopted in late July by a loving young teacher and renamed Hexham (there is a back story to his new name). He joins a four-legged sister as well. He has integrated quickly and happily into his new family and forever home. Happy tails, Mango/Hexham!

Sullivan County Humane Society: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The money was used to amputate the left front leg of a kitten who had been surrendered to the shelter.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped our organization by allowing us to provide the medical care this kitten so desperately needed. Scamper was in pain every day because of the crush injury to her leg. Being an all-volunteer run non-profit, it is sometimes very difficult to raise funds for emergency surgeries like Scamper’s.

How many pets did this grant help?

One (1)

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Scamper was surrendered with her mom when she was just a baby, with a crushed front leg. She saw an orthopedic veterinarian, who said that her right leg had two issues: The leg was broken in the upper portion, causing it to twist in, and her paw had a crush injury. It appeared that, although possibly just an accident (we are not claiming abuse), she was most likely stepped on. We were shocked as he was examining it — her right paw had some fur on it but also looked to be heavily scabbed over. During the exam, the vet was able to slip the scab off — it was like a glove over her little paw, with a lot of puss under it. Her paw had no paw pad and she only had two of her toes left. It was determined that the best option was to amputate her leg due to the day-to-day pain she was experiencing.

Scamper received the surgery thanks to the Petfinder Foundation. Though it was a few months of recovery and many new challenges, Scamper has recovered wonderfully. Scamper, now known as Peg, has been adopted to her forever home and her new mom says that she is now the fastest cat in the house. She is a joy to have around and she loves all of her new brothers and sisters, one of whom has cerebellar hyperplasia and is as special as Peg. Peg’s new mom cannot thank the Petfinder Foundation enough, as she is a very special girl.

Santa Paula Animal Rescue Center: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

We used the money we received for Heidi to get her the ear-ablation surgery she needed. She came to us emaciated and thin, with a severe abscess on one side of her face.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We used the $1,000 toward the first of her two ear surgeries. She continues to struggle with infection and is in a foster home.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Heidi is such a sweetheart and had severe infections in both her ears and in her mouth when she arrived at SPARC. Due to the severity and depth of the infections, she had to have her ears ablated, which means the ear canals were completely removed. One of her ears has healed well, but the other ear still shows signs of infection and, despite antibiotics, continues to be a problem for her.

When she arrived at SPARC, Heidi was emaciated and starving. That, of course, has been remedied, but she still suffers from the terrible allergies she already had. We sent her to see Dr. Greek, a veterinary dermatologist and allergist, who is going to test her for everything to alleviate her skin irritation and hopefully allow her to grow fur again on her huge bald spots! She will also have her ear flushed and cleaned and will possibly be put on new antibiotics.

EVERY animal, no matter how sick or injured, gets a second chance at life, unless a vet tells us there’s nothing else that can be done for an animal. Heidi is currently in medical foster care and we believe that her foster family will adopt her once she is healthy and her allergies are under control.

Sylvan Lake & Area Serenity Pet Shelter Society: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

We received your medical grant. The money was put towards an existing vet debt from the amputation of one of our cats’ legs. We rescued Tori from Torrington, AB, and we discovered that she had been shot. The leg was not salvageable.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

You have helped us by clearing this debt so that we can continue to help other animals in need. Tori is being nursed back to health by a loving foster family, who have even hinted that they may want to keep her. You have provided a very happy ending to a very deserving and loving cat. We are so grateful!

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

A volunteer’s mother-in-law called us to investigate a cat who was said to have a broken paw. The cat had been living under a car for two weeks and was being fed by an elderly gentleman. After a few days of trying to trap her, we were successful. She was located in Torrington, Alberta, and then transported to our vet in Rimbey, AB.

After an examination and x-ray, we found out that she had been shot. The injury was so serious that she required an amputation. Tori is a little fighter and, even with the loss of a leg, is moving around her foster mom’s house quite well.

This surgery put us over our allowed limit at our veterinary clinic, and we needed to get our bill down so that Tori could go back for shots and a spay. She was unable to be spayed while she was under for her amputation, as the amputation was long and keeping her under any longer would have been hazardous to her health.

City of Elderly Love: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

This grant was used to provide a senior dog with amputation surgery for a severely broken front leg.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant has helped us free up funds in our veterinary care fund, allowing us to rescue additional at-risk senior pets at Philadelphia’s animal control shelter.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

This grant helped Bridgette, an older pit-bull mix who was rescued from Philadelphia’s animal control shelter, where she was surrendered with a severely broken leg. Thanks to the grant, she received amputation surgery, which has provided her much-needed relief from chronic pain. Bridgette was shy and scared the first couple of weeks in her new foster home due to the amount of pain she had been experiencing for so long. Now that she’s recovered from surgery and is no longer in pain, she’s opening up, beginning to play, and is finally able to get back to just being a dog. She’ll soon be spayed and will begin the hunt for her forever home!

Lucky Tales Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The money from the grant was used to pay bills for Kimber’s hip surgery.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant was a huge help in aiding us in helping Kimber. He had very extensive hip surgery and thankfully has made a full recovery. It helped all the pets in our care, as we were able to set this money aside for his bills while still continuing to operate in our normal capacity.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Kimber came to us with double hip dysplasia. Due to this, we elected to have a double pelvic osteotomy surgery performed on both sides of his hips. Unfortunately, Kimber had complications and suffered pelvic fractures on both sides of his hips post-surgery. Due to this, he went in for a second surgery two days later. Again, complications came up, and Kimber suffered from a MRSA-type of infection in his hip implants. Therefore, the decision was made to remove those. While the implants were removed, there was enough time before this for the bone to regrow. Therefore, the hip dysplasia was cured. He has been adopted into his furever home and is doing great!

Bottle Babies Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

This emergency medical grant was used for one of our poor foster pups, Lola, who got too playful in the yard playing with her older brother and ended up with a fractured leg, needing surgery and casting to heal.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Since we are a nonprofit, medical bills are one of our biggest challenges. We do not avoid any costs when it comes to keeping our foster animals healthy and on track. With that being said, there are a lot of times we go without other needed items so that we can cover the medical bills. This grant allowed us to not only provide the total medical care that Lola needed, but to continue to provide the other stimulating and enriching items needed by our other foster pups.

How many pets did this grant help?

One

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Lola is a 5-month-old American bulldog/Labrador retriever mix. She has been in her foster home for a few weeks now, awaiting her forever home. Unfortunately, poor precious Lola was outdoors playing with her foster brother, who is a large-breed dog, supervised by her foster mom, and she got somewhat carried away, running herself into a tree. She was taken to the vet, and diagnostics showed she had a fractured leg, requiring surgery. With this grant, Lola was able to receive TOTAL CARE for her leg fracture, and is living with the best quality of life now! Lola has been adopted.

Animal Shelter Volunteers of Texas: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The money was used to repair a broken leg (FX, Lg Long Bone, Plate) on Buddy, a German shepherd mix.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant helped Animal Shelter Volunteers of Texas to provide needed surgery to fix Buddy’s broken leg, which was causing him pain and preventing him from being adopted, as most adopters are unlikely to be able to afford the expense of surgery. This surgery allowed Buddy to successfully find an adoptive home.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Buddy, a 4-month-old German shepherd mix, came to ASVT’s attention after he was hit by a car. A community member found Buddy injured and contacted ASVT for assistance. He had suffered a broken leg and required surgery to put a plate in his leg. ASVT provided medical care, boarding, and foster care and then transported Buddy to find his forever home in Iowa. He has since been adopted and is much-loved by his new family.

Equine Aid: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

It was used as a part of the payment to have a diseased eye removed from a pony we took in in March 2017.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We fundraised the balance of the eye removal fee. With the grant from the Petfinder Foundation, we were able to avoid dipping into our general or veterinary funds. Grady feels much better without the diseased eye, and funds for further herd care were preserved.

How many pets did this grant help?

In essence, 25, as our entire herd benefited from not using our budgeted funds for this unexpected and expensive surgery.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

In early March we were told that Braydy, a miniature donkey, and Grady, a miniature horse, were in rough shape. When I first visited, the owners were not interested in assistance and would not allow me to meet the animals. A few days later, they called and we left to pick up Braydy and Grady. Their condition was alarming: Their feet curled up and above the hairline, and they were scurfy and matted with burrs. Worst of all, Grady’s right eye was a sunken hole filled with pus.

When they arrived at the farm, we cleaned them up and had their first hoof trims on day one. We also realized that Braydy needed to be gelded. We soon had our vet out for exams. Her conclusion was that Grady’s eye was painful and should be removed. We scheduled the eye removal with a wonderful vet hospital. While we waited for “the day,” we had Braydy gelded and began worming them according to our vet’s protocol. They went to the hospital together, as the vet had realized that Braydy acted as Grady’s guide and comfort.

The surgery went very well and the boys were treated like visiting royalty. Grady recovered quickly; his stitches dissolved in about 10 days. Once he was stable, it was time for much-needed dental care. They are now both healthy, charming and looking for their forever homes! Meet them both: http://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/42386734

Saving Grace Rescue Inc: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Multiple surgeries and diagnostics for Bernie the cat: Eyelid agenesis repair, cardiac ultrasound and cryptorchid neuter,

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Bernie’s procedures could not have been done without the grant funds. He has healed from his surgeries and is living pain-free and in an adopted home. He plays and is enjoying a second kittenhood!

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Bernie was brought in to a high-risk shelter as a young adult intact male with a serious hind-leg injury, a heart murmur and a genetic condition that caused him to be nearly blind. Despite his clearly having had a rough start, Bernie’s incredibly sweet and mellow personality touched the shelter staff and they reached out for this unlikely candidate to go to rescue. Three surgeries later, Bernie and his an unwaveringly kind and happy attitude found a home. He moved into a home with two other rescue cats and family with a young boy. Bernie curls up every night with a pillow sewn just for him, cuddling his favorite toy and holding hands/paws with his new best friend.

House Rabbit Society of Missouri: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

To help pay for the orthopedic surgery Cammie required for her broken front legs so that it would be possible for her to survive and find a loving home.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Rabbits are the third most abandoned pet in the country. There are few resources for them. We have a tremendous number of animal agencies and individuals calling us for help. Our shelter houses around 150 bunnies. Spending a huge sum of money on one animal does not help make you responsible towards all of the other animals in your care. This grant allowed us to do both.

How many pets did this grant help?

One

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Cammie was found and brought to us with both front legs broken. There was someone who thought she’d been thrown out of an apartment window. The breaks were serious and required an orthopedic surgeon. She spent several months with pins holding her bones together, but the surgery ultimately worked, leaving Cammie healthy, happy, and able to walk again. Not only was Cammie healthy, but she quickly found her furever home, so now she is not only healthy, happy, and hopping again — she is loved.

Speak St. Louis: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

It was used towards Mia’s surgeries.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

As you know, being a 501(c)3 nonprofit rescue, Speak! STL relies on donations and grants to help the animals we rescue. Some rescued pets like Mia require extensive medical care. Although we are small, we do all we can to make sure our Speaklings are healthy and happy.

How many pets did this grant help?

Mia

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Mia was born without an anus and lived outside on a chain the first several months of her life. Thanks to our loving volunteers, donations and this grant, this sweet girl had several surgeries so she can go to the bathroom normally. She is now loving life with her foster family. She loves to play ball and frisbee. It’s a joy to see her happy and enjoying life to the fullest. She is still searching for her forever home. Meet her: http://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/41422875

Connor and Millie's Dog Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The grant money was used for emergency surgery for our foster dog Dotty. She had an eye removed and the socket became infected. She required two additional surgeries and intensive medical care at the vet hospital.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Dotty has fully healed and recovered from this surgery and has been adopted into a loving home.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Dotty was one of three dogs rescued from a hoarding situation. She was emaciated, dirty, and blind when Connor and Millie’s Dog Rescue obtained possession of her. Our vet discovered that she was diabetic and she was started on a proper diet and insulin injections. She went into foster care and was nursed back to health. Unexpectedly, one of Dotty’s eyes developed a corneal ulcer and had to be removed. After the surgery, the socket became infected. The infection quickly spread throughout her entire face and she required two additional surgeries to clean out the infection and remove the infected tissue. She was extremely sick for two weeks, requiring IV antibiotics and constant care at the veterinary hospital. She was finally released back to her foster home, where she continued to heal.

Her vet bills were over $4,000. Thanks to the grant we received from the Petfinder Foundation, we were able to pay off a good portion of those bills. Dotty is now happy and healthy and has been adopted into a loving home that can accommodate her diabetes and her blindness.

Tender Loving Cats, Inc.: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The money was used for veterinary care and medicine to treat Luis’ eye condition.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Thanks to the Petfinder Foundation grant, we were able to help Luis receive the appropriate medical care to become adoptable with his sister Louise and find their forever home.

How many pets did this grant help?

2

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Luis and his sister Louise were found outside by a young man, but he was unable to care for them and found our rescue to take them in on April 19, 2018. They were only 8 months old. Luis clearly has some Siamese in his background, as he has the classic wedge-shaped head and the coat color and blue eyes of a Siamese. Luis was fortunate to come to our rescue, as he was born with eyelid agenesis, a congenital defect of the upper and lower eyelid, and required surgery to correct it and make him more comfortable and able to see.

The surgery was successful! But after the surgery he was diagnosed with a rare bacterial infection called clostridium. Thankfully, after being treated, Luis and his sister were feeling better and were ready to take the trip to Newtown, PA, where they found their furrever home — together! It cost us over $1,300 to provide these two kittens the medical care they needed. The Petfinder Foundation grant was used to help defray the cost of Luis and Louise’s medical care.

Rescue Animals in Need: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The funds were used to pay for tail amputation surgery for our kitten Dory.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Dory was able to get the lifesaving procedure she needed.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Dory was rescued from an open-intake shelter as a 12-week-old kitten by RAIN. During her examination, it was discovered that Dory’s tail had been completely broken off internally from the rest of her spine. This meant she was not be able to move it, causing pain and open sores on her rear legs and rectal areas. Now that she has had the tail-amputation procedure, she is living a pain-free life and is just waiting for her forever home. Meet her: http://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/40931656

Boone County Animal Care: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The grant was used for the urgent medical care of an FIV-positive cat. The funds were used for laser treatment of an open neck wound, to remove a huge ear polyp and bullet, and to treat a severe ear infection.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant contributed to the medical costs for one cat who needed weekly treatments for a severe, open neck wound. This made funds available to help other cats, particularly a large colony of sick cats taken in by the organization earlier in the year.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Jeff was found as a stray in a rural Missouri community, and his caretakers noticed a neck injury that just wasn’t healing after at least six months. They contacted Boone County Animal Care for help, and it was originally thought that Jeff had an old bite wound that had abscessed. However, it was soon discovered that this sweet 4- to 5-year-old, FIV-positive brown tabby had a severe ear infection, a huge ear polyp, a bullet lodged in his ear canal, and a large open neck wound. The polyp, bullet, and his remaining rotten teeth were extracted. The ear infection was treated with antibiotics and Jeff underwent a series of laser treatments to expedite healing of the open neck wound.

Jeff’s ear infection cleared up and his neck wound healed completely. This sweet, affectionate, social kitty is just a big old teddy bear, and he even comes when called! He wins the hearts of all who meet him, so it’s not surprising that this lovable fellow was adopted in a short time. He now has a family to call his very own, including a human brother who always wanted a kitty named Jeff!

Kent Animal Shelter: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The grant was an emergency medical grant for a 2-year-old Labrador mix named Khloe. Khloe need bilateral femoral head osteotomies. The procedure was performed on June 21, 2018. The surgeon’s fee for services was $2,250 and additional hospitalization was $2,269.89. The procedure was a success and the dog is recovering nicely. The $1,000 will be utilized to help pay the medical expenses.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant helped Khloe walk again without pain. She suffered from severe hip dysplasia, resulting in dislocation of the hip joints. The surgical intervention involved removing the head of the femurs. Khloe was able to walk before the surgery, but with great difficulty and pain. She is recovering well and the surgeon’s prognosis was an excellent one. Khloe was adopted by her foster mom and is doing quite well. The surgery would not have been possible without the help of the Petfinder Foundation.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Khloe was transported by a rescue group that works with [an open-admission] shelter in Texas. When Khloe arrived, she was determined to have problems walking. Upon further evaluation, it was diagnosed that she suffered from severe hip dysplasia that caused dislocation of both hip joints. The only way to help Khloe walk again without pain was orthopedic surgery. Khloe is a great dog and deserved a great life. She found that life with her foster family who, after the surgery, adopted her. Khloe is recuperating and progressing well.

Lake Norman Humane: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The Emergency Medical Grant for Bud was used for the amputation of his left forelimb. His total surgery cost $2,600 so the emergency grant covered almost half.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Without this grant, Lake Norman Humane would not have been able to provide the emergency care Bud needed for the injuries he sustained. Obtaining this grant allowed us to give Bud a second chance and lead him to his now forever home.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Bud was surrendered to a local animal control after his front paw was run over by a lawnmower. Two of the bones were severed and the other was crushed. His owners were unable to provide care for him; Animal Control did everything it could but didn’t have the resources to continue care for the sweet boy and was going to euthanize him. We were able to pull Bud into our program 30 minutes before he was schedule to be euthanized. His wound was over two weeks old and was already pretty nasty to begin with. Bud was immediately transferred to an emergency hospital and then transferred to a boarded surgeon. Due to the severity of his injury, it was found to be in his best interest to amputate his forelimb. He was also found to be heartworm-positive, which made his anesthesia more risky. Despite all that he has been through he has such a loving and forgiving soul. Bud has recovered remarkably well from his amputation and heartworm treatment and was adopted at the beginning of June by his foster family.

Jelly's Place: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Medical expenses.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped us provide urgent veterinary care to pets in need. Without grants like these, we would not have been able to help animals like Delilah, and she would have worsened and likely died.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Delilah was a sweet tortie kitten brought in by a homeless person who found her with a horrible injury to her leg. After trying to get her help at different rescues, he came to Jelly’s Place and we took her in. Her leg was so injured that her bone was exposed. She needed an amputation, and because gangrene had set in, the vet had to remove most of her shoulder blade, then transfer other muscle to partially recreate her shoulder. Delilah then she required another hospitalization and extended treatment to overcome a serious infection that set in after the original injury. Delilah got along with other cats and loved to be held and petted. As Delilah was recovering, one of our volunteers showed pictures of her to a friend who had another three-legged cat, and she fell in love. Delilah is now happy in her new home and has a sibling just like her. Thanks to the Petfinder Foundation, Delilah had a second chance.

Berea Animal Rescue Fund Shelter: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

We received an emergency medical grant from you to help with veterinary costs for an abused puppy. The puppy had been strangled for having an accident in the house.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Emergency medical bill

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

On behalf of the Berea Animal Rescue Fund, I would like to extend my sincerest thanks to the Petfinder Foundation and its Emergency Medical Grant program. Thanks to the $1,000 grant we received from your organization, we were able to obtain emergency medical treatment for an abused puppy in our care. Our organization received a call that a puppy, Jimmie, had been brought into a local veterinarian’s office for care after being strangled by a family member for having an accident in the house. The puppy was not brought in for treatment until more than one full day after the abuse occurred and was in dire condition. She needed x-rays, oxygen therapy, and antibiotics to have a chance at survival. The family was not able to pay for treatment and asked that the puppy be euthanized. Berea ARF agreed to take the puppy in and obtain all necessary medical treatment for her care. With the help of the Petfinder Foundation and its grant towards Jimmie’s care, she was able to make a full recovery and has since been adopted by a volunteer who was fostering her through her treatment. She is now named Gemma. We cannot thank you enough for your generous support.

New Leash on Life USA: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Total ear-canal ablation surgery

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Enabled us to provide much-needed comfort to Rosie, whom we rescued after seeing her in the shelter and knew had been a victim of horrifying abuse and neglect.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

The funds donated for Rosie’s medical care were applied to her recent TECA (total ear canal ablation) surgery. Rosie has horrific scarring of her ear pina and canal from past abuse and attempts to crop her ears with fishing line. After years of regular cleaning and external treatments, her ears were still chronically inflamed and she was suffering from repeat infections due to trapped fluid within the scar-tissue folds. This was her second TECA procedure to remove her remaining ear tissue and prevent all future ear infections and discomfort. The surgery was performed at the Veterinary Referral Center in Malvern, PA, on March 31, 2018, and she is recovering well at this time.

Forever Friends Humane Society: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Fonzie was hurt when found; he had a broken leg that required immediate surgery.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We applied and in no time the funds were granted to us! They covered almost all of his emergency vet bill. We are so low on funding at this time due to weather issues and not being able to do adoptions that when Fonzie came to us, we did not have the funding to help him.

How many pets did this grant help?

One: Fonzie, a 12-week-old beagle mix

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Fonzie was found in a cemetery with his two sisters. They had been there for at least two weeks, according to the woman who found them and took food to them. Fonzie had suffered an injury to his back leg; we are not sure how it happened and I guess we will never know.

When we got the call about them, I sent one of my foster homes to pick them up. She contacted me and said the little male had an injury to his back leg. We took him to the vet the next morning. She found that it had been badly broken. He had surgery the very next day. We picked him up that afternoon and brought him home for recovery. We posted his pictures and story on our Petfinder website. It didn’t take very long for us to hear from someone wanting to adopt this sweet baby! They filled out the application and, once approved, they adopted him.

Fonzie’s new family was very willing to follow his recovery instructions and took him for his vet checks and his final visit to get a pin removed. Thanks to the Petfinder Foundation, Fonzie can now lead a normal, happy life with a wonderful family that loves him dearly! The fourth photo shows Fonzie with his new mom.

Pets Alive: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The Emergency Medical Grant was used to pay for emergency surgery on a stray cat who had been hit by a car and had a severely injured leg.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant enabled us to give Daryl the emergency leg amputation he needed after being hit by a car. A bone was protruding from his hind leg and he was in a lot of pain. The leg could not be saved.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Bad luck turned to good luck for Daryl when a good Samaritan came upon the 2-year-old, long-haired cat and brought him to us on Jan. 30, 2018. Daryl, a stray cat, had been hit by a car and was badly injured. A bone was protruding from his hind leg and he was in a lot of pain. When we saw the extent of his injury, Daryl was immediately admitted to the veterinary hospital. Sadly, diagnostics revealed that he had a compound fracture. The best course of action for Daryl to have any qualify of life without pain would be to amputate his leg. Preparatory bloodwork was drawn and a brave Daryl was prepared for surgery. Post-surgery, Daryl came back to our shelter to recover as he awaited his forever home. His enthusiasm for his newfound friends — both feline and human — and his determination to not let this slow him down, enabled him to recover. Before long, he was learning how to navigate with three legs and quickly became a staff and volunteer favorite.

His friendly and loving nature soon captured the heart of a family, and on March 10, 2018, Daryl went to his forever home. The adopter recently told us, “He loves to play with his toys and could be a soccer player – even with just three legs! He enjoys a nightly belly rub when I get home from work. He adjusted very quickly to his new home and my grandchildren love to come visit him. He sends his love to you for taking such good care of him at Pets Alive!”

PEARL Parrot Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The money was used for hernia/tumor surgery for Tiki, the Moluccan cockatoo.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Without this funding, we would have not been able to afford the surgery, effectively putting Tiki into hospice care.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Tiki is a beautiful 17-year-old Moluccan cockatoo who was surrendered to PEARL Parrot Rescue when her owner could no longer provide for her. Upon intake, we discovered a large mass on Tiki’s butt. We knew we had to get this sweet girl to the vet for testing right away. Our veterinarian ran multiple tests and discovered a massive hernia encasing Tiki’s organs. Without surgery to remove the tumor, Tiki’s intestines could lose their blood supply and she would die. It was determined that she would need to see a specialist.

On Jan. 18, 2018, she was taken to see an avian vet who specializes in operating on parrots — a rare specialist to find. Because of the location of the tumor and the effect it was having on her internal organs, the surgery was very risky and very costly. Initial quotes for the procedure ran upwards of $4,000, not including the $800 in diagnostic testing to get us to this point.

After the surgery, Tiki stayed at the surgery center for a total of 45 days, receiving subsequent surgeries to tighten loose skin that the tumor had stretched out. Now that she’s back in the rescue, we’re looking for a very special person to become her forever flock. We can tell she’s definitely feeling better because she never stops moving! Her favorite things to say are “I love you” and “pretty bird” and to whinny like a horse! Meet her: http://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/40617803

Northwest Boxer Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The medical care of an emergency intake named Hank with severe mange and infection covering his entire body

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant allowed us to treat Hank’s medical condition, which amounted to more than $1,200 in veterinary bills, without compromising the medical care of the other dogs in rescue.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Hank came into rescue one night as an emergency intake. He was covered in mange and infection and living in an abusive home that refused to provide him with basic medical care. He was rushed to the ER vet, where he received a medicated bath and much-needed medications to treat his red, infected, and itchy skin. He continued receiving medical care over several months until he was healed and well enough to find a forever home to call his own. He has been adopted and is living a wonderful life where his every need will be provided for.

St. Joseph Animal Control and Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The funds were used to pay for surgery on a homeless dog.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We have limited funding for shelter animals and cannot afford to pay for veterinary care for catastrophic injuries such as Beau’s. This grant helped him heal through surgery and rehab and allowed him to be adopted into a new home.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Beau was a young male shepherd mix who came to the shelter with a badly injured leg. After x-rays and a veterinary examination, it was determined that Beau would need multiple surgeries to repair the fractures. Our shelter received a grant from the Petfinder Foundation that allowed us to pay for the surgeries. After Beau was on the road to healing, he was quickly adopted by a loving family! He was so happy to be leaving the shelter and has made wonderful progress. He is jumping and running without any pain.

Calvin's Paws: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The money was used for cold laser therapy, surgery and vet care for a facial debriding wound on a feline. The wound covered half of the cat’s face and eyelids, back to his ear and down to the base of his neck. He receives daily wound cleaning, dressing, sugar-and-honey packs and periodic sutures to help close the wound. Anticipated total time for recovery is 10-12 months.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This amazing community cat had sustained a wound (likely from a fight) which turned into an abscess and burst, leaving half of his face an open wound, exposed down to the muscle and tendon, with no eyelids and no skin from his ear to his eye and down to his neck. This cat had been walking around like this for almost two years. He presented at our clinic in a carrier, purring and rubbing both sides of his face on anyone that would give him attention. Clearly this boy wanted to live and we wanted to help him — and our vet was completely committed to helping. Luckily the Petfinder Foundation was willing to help us finance the care that this boy needed to have his own miracle and get on the path to recovery.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Several years ago, someone left this gorgeous Maine coon boy to try and survive on his own. Some kind folks in the neighborhood started feeding him and trying to earn his trust, but two years ago, Elvis sustained a wound on his face from a cat fight. That wound turned into an abscess and burst. The kind folks feeding him sought help, but no one would help them – offering only vague estimates of $1,000 to fix him, or to euthanize him. Eventually, his people found us, and he came in for a community-cat spay day this weekend. As soon as we met him, Elvis rubbed his face from one side to the other on the volunteer’s hand and he purred. (Also, for those wondering – yes, we were more than a little wigged out when he rubbed his gaping wound on our hands!) He was not acting painful or scared, despite the fact that half of his face and his eye were one huge open wound.

Our vet set a plan to do a cleaning, then begin getting the tissue healthy, debriding, doing sugar-and-honey packs and cold-laser therapy while she worked on closing the wound in tiny increments to avoid starting back with another abscess. The finders named this boy Elvis and he has become the rock star cat in our rescue. Everyone loves him and he walks around the vet’s office like it is his own personal Graceland. A huge male cat named Hatteras is also at the vet’s office awaiting his forever home. He has become Elvis’s bodyguard and requires pets before he lets anyone near his pal. They are now celebrities and are even making a guest appearance at the Sip and Shop event at the Purr and Bark/Woofinwaggle event this weekend. Getting Elvis back to his perfectly handsome self is slow going, but he is a super happy cat and happy to be alive. The Petfinder Foundation’s grant helped us to be able to save a wonderful cat who had been turned away and discarded by person after person for many years. Elvis is forever grateful, as are we and his entire fan club.

St. Francis Society Animal Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The $1,000 Emergency Medical Grant was used to help Norman, a critical-care feline.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant was used to help offset the more than $10,000 in veterinary bills we accrued for Norman’s care.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Norman is a 2-year-old domestic shorthair cat. He was brought to our county animal shelter by a good Samaritan who found him lying in the middle of a main highway, having been hit by a car. Norman was saved from euthanasia by a local animal lover, George. George brought Norman to a private veterinarian, who diagnosed him with bilateral luxating patellas. As if that wasn’t terrible enough, Norman contracted a severe upper-respiratory infection that quickly overtook his body. Unable to afford the proper care for Norman, George surrendered him to St. Francis Society. Norman needed 24-hour critical care at a veterinary specialist (Blue Pearl) as he fought the infection in his body. In addition to the infection, he was also suffering from a critical electrolyte and sodium imbalance and had to be in an incubator, as his body was unable to maintain its temperature. He had a feeding tube as he was unable to eat on his own.

Today, our special cat, Norman, continues to progress in his journey to recovery. Several weeks ago, he was released from his specialists at Blue Pearl and also VCA Carrollwood Cats after treatment for the condition that nearly took his life. All of his medical professionals attest that Norman truly is a “miracle cat” in that there was very little hope early on that he would make it through the severe URI that compromised his entire immune system. But with the extensive medical care and love he received from his St Francis foster family, Norman flourished, and is now nearing the time when we will be able to have his luxating hip injury corrected. Following his FHO (femoral head ostectomy) surgery, he will undergo rehabilitation for a period of 6-8 weeks. After this period, we are very hopeful that Norman’s mobility will be much improved and a forever home can be found for him.

Delta Animal Shelter: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The grant was used for surgery on one of our cats, Wish. He needed an ear ablation and bullae osteotomy procedure, which removed the entire ear canal along with the lining of the bullae.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped us get Wish the surgery he needed for the growth in his ear. We wouldn’t have been able to afford this procedure if not for this grant.

How many pets did this grant help?

One cat, Wish.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Wish came to us as a stray in December of 2016. After his stray hold was completed, he was neutered and put up for adoption. He was adopted in February of 2017 and went to a very loving home. We were contacted by his adopter in December 2017 and told that he had a growth in his ear. The adopter could not afford to bring Wish to the vet for care. He was surrendered back to us and we had our vet check on the ear. She removed what she could of the growth. Unfortunately, it started growing back. After further testing, it was decided that he would need more extensive surgery — a surgery that could not be done locally. We were referred to Dr. Allen Dunbar at Packerland Veterinary Center in Green Bay. Because this was going to be an expensive surgery, we filled out the application for grant support from the Petfinder Foundation. Thankfully, our application was accepted and we immediately scheduled Wish for surgery. Wish had his surgery on Feb. 23, 2018. He then went into foster care while he recovered from this extensive surgery. When he was medically released, we put him up for adoption. He was adopted on March 22, 2018. Wish is doing fantastic in his new home and getting all the love and cuddles he could ever ask for. Thank you, Petfinder Foundation for this amazing grant!!

Shih Tzu Rescue, Inc.: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The emergency medical grant was used for Little Stevie’s intensive surgery in which his shattered pelvis was rebuilt, a three-day emergency-room stay, the medications he required, follow-up appointments with his specialist, and physical therapy.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The emergency medical grant that the Petfinder Foundation provided helped lessen the blow of such a large expense for us right as the new year was starting. We have many dogs in our care on our campus, and medical bills that reach into the thousands of dollars are a constant strain on our finite resources.

How many pets did this grant help?

One special little guy!

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

On New Year’s Eve, we received a call from a motorist who had just picked up a Shih Tzu from the road who had been hit by a car. The motorist had stopped when the little dog ran in front of his car; unfortunately an oncoming driver did not, but ran over the little dog and sped ahead. Our good Samaritan drove around the block to rescue the little dog from oncoming traffic and was surprised to find him alive. He googled Shih Tzu Rescue, called us, and asked if we’d help. We asked him to take the poor little dog to the hospital, where he arrived in 24 minutes, unable to move around. The vet told us that our dog appeared to be a young male, but he was so severely matted they’d have to cut some hair away before they could determine the extent of his injuries.

The Fourth of July and New Year’s Eve are probably the most frightening holidays of the year for dogs, many of whom are absolutely terrified of the noise of fireworks. Poor Little Stevie, obviously the victim of horrific neglect, was likely trying to get to a safe place without fireworks. It is a MIRACLE that an individual, with plans of his own on the holiday, intervened so that Stevie didn’t die scared and alone on the side of the road. Meet Stevie: http://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/41099457

Halfway Home Rescue, Inc.: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

See below.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This $1,000 grant helped to ease the financial burden of Dudley’s medical expenses. We are beyond thankful. With this assistance, we were able to make sure Dudley had all of the care he required and we did not have to take the $1,000 difference away from other animals needing veterinary care.

How many pets did this grant help?

Just Dudley

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

This generous donation was used to assist with Dudley’s throat surgery. Dudley is a bulldog mix who was surrendered to a local vet for euthanasia. His previous owner had determined that Dudley was not of “breeding stock” and requested euthanasia. The veterinarian refused and the owner agreed to surrender Dudley to our rescue. Dudley was suffering from skin infections, eye infections and ear infections and was struggling to breathe. Dudley’s veterinary costs have been astronomical; the throat surgery alone totaled $2,813.25. This $1,000 grant helped to ease the financial burden. We are beyond thankful. Dudley is still recovering from surgery, but should be available for adoption in 4-6 weeks (when his veterinarian is expected to clear him for adoption).

San Antonio Pets Alive!: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

San Antonio Pets Alive! used the funds generously donated by the Petfinder Foundation to provide treatment for Charlie, a dog rescued from the euthanasia list at the San Antonio city shelter. The cost to SAPA! of saving any dog from euthanasia is at least $150. Charlie’s special medical needs meant that his care cost much more. The Petfinder Foundation grant allowed SAPA! to consult with an outside specialist. At this clinic, Charlie received x-rays and blood tests and underwent an in-depth physical exam. This cost $544. It was determined that Charlie would need heartworm treatment, medication to reduce arthritis inflammation, pain medication, and a special diet. Charlie was placed with a medical foster who additionally provided physical and hydrotherapy. Over the next several months, Charlie’s cost of care was an additional $1,000.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

SAPA! is grateful to the Petfinder Foundation because the support allowed us to give Charlie every possible chance at rehabilitation. We know we did everything we could for Charlie, thanks to the Petfinder Foundation, and Charlie’s suffering was eased during his last months of life. He also was very loved and cared for, which is important to any animal’s overall health. If Charlie could, he would thank you all in a big way for what you were able to help him accomplish and for the love he received.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Poor Charlie was surrendered by his owner, and was also a victim of chronic neglect at his owner’s hands. Charlie suffered from severe obesity, untreated parasites, and painful arthritis that made any movement difficult. Many times, people think of neglectful animal ownership leading to an animal not being fed, but it can be just as neglectful to overfeed until an animal is suffering. Charlie showed us that neglect can have many faces.

Soon after his rescue, Charlie underwent diagnostic testing that showed he had various health problems, and SAPA! set to work to help him get better. After quickly finding placement with a devoted medical-specialist foster, Charlie was put on a careful diet and exercise plan. The goal was to help Charlie feel better and move better, which would help him lose weight. The program had to be slow because of Charlie’s cholesterol and health problems that put his heart at risk. Charlie also received arthritis medications to make the exercise process easier.

Over the next few months, Charlie, already a senior at over 6 years old, was making slow and steady improvement. However, Charlie’s medical interventions were sadly started too late in his life, and his neglectful past had already started to make permanent changes to his health. He passed away of a suspected heart attack not quite a year after his rescue.

Good Karma Pet Rescue, Inc.: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Orthopedic surgery on one of our foster cats, Marisol, who was at our local shelter with a severe leg injury.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It provided much-needed financial support to cover a large surgical bill for one of our foster cats, which allowed us to direct our donations to the other 200+ animals in our care.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Marisol was on an urgent rescue bulletin from our local shelter, Broward County Animal Services. She was in dire need of medical care due to a cast from an old injury being left on her leg for far too long. She ended up with a deep wound which made her leg appear mangled. We rushed her to Pet Express Animal Hospital and originally thought her leg would need to be amputated, but the doctor found that, although the injury was severe, she had good blow flow. They recommended healing the wound, then conducting orthopedic surgery to replace the pin in her leg, since it had not healed properly.

Long story short, we attempted the orthopedic surgery, but it was sadly not successful. Marisol was unable to regain use of her leg and, a few weeks after her surgery, she ended up needing an amputation. While we had hoped to save her leg, Marisol didn’t let it bring her down. She healed beautifully and was running and jumping around like an active young cat with four legs! Once she was fully recovered, she went to the Good Luck Cat Cafe to be placed for adoption and she quickly found her forever home.

American Lurcher Rescue Project: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

On January 18, a complex surgery to repair multiple issues was performed by Dr. Dyce of the Ohio State University Veterinary Medical School. Dr. Dyce cut the tibia bone (in the lower leg) in two places. He realigned the angle at the top of the tibia by cutting a wedge out. This will help Wesley’s knee function correctly. He also corrected the curvature and twist in the tibia by cutting at the middle of the tibia and inserting a bone graft. This will add to the functionality of the knee and help prevent future arthritis. All of this was initially held together by pins and an external fixator device.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We are now six weeks post-surgery, and just a few days ago Wesley had some of the pins removed, though others remain. He needs to return to OSU and see Dr. Dyce in three weeks. We are hopeful he will have the rest of the fixator removed at that point. The lower wedge osteotomy has signs of healing on both sides. The upper osteotomy is healed on one side and healing is progressing on the other side. The doctor was very, very happy with this. Also, it appears that the kneecap is tracking exactly how it is supposed to be in the knee joint. This grant meant we were able to get a very young and otherwise healthy dog the surgery he needed to have a good quality of life on four legs for the first time, and still be able to take more than 20 dogs in real need into our rescue in the months of December and January. This grant means Wesley will run AND we did not turn any others away while undertaking this significant surgery for him.

How many pets did this grant help?

Only one directly – Wesley.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Wesley, an American lurcher-type dog (a greyhound/coonhound mix), was bred for the sport of field trial racing, but apparently suffered an injury to the growth plate in his right tibia when he was a puppy. As he grew to adulthood, his tibia became very malformed. Once the field trial racing owner realized that Wesley was suffering from a significant skeletal defect, he contacted us and asked if we could find him a good home. We had consultations with a few vet clinics and opted to pursue TPLO orthopedic surgery with the Ohio State University to give Wesley the best chance of success. Thanks in great part to the generous support of a medical grant from the Petfinder Foundation, Wesley had his complex double-wedge osteotomy just about six weeks ago and and is recovering beautifully in a wonderful, supportive medical foster home. While he is still technically available for adoption at the moment, we have strong applications for a great home for him and feel he will be running on all fours for the first time in his life in his forever home soon. Meet Wesley: http://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/39885131

Half the Way Home: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

To pay off medical bills for Martha and continue her treatment

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped replenish funds after/while treating Martha for multiple pellet wounds to the face.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Martha came in to Animal Control with wounds to the face. As her stay wore on, her face/nose continued to swell. When Half the Way Home pulled her and posted her photo to our Facebook page, someone asked if she was a rabbit! She had two wounds to the nose and a hole in the roof of her mouth. She would eat wet food, and then sneeze it out through her nose and eye. Yes: her eye. She was a mess. Testing was done. Her nose was so big. Could this be a wound plus a tumor or fungus? X-rays showed nothing lodged.

She started her treatment on pain meds, two antibiotics and an inflammatory. This lasted for a month! Then she did another round of antibiotics. Things seemed to be moving along, but there was still swelling in the bridge of her nose, so a fungal test was done. Not a fungus. It was decided she needed a biopsy and nasal flush. That was when we submitted for the grant. We were easily getting more and more in the red. While Martha was under, she was spayed and vetted. Her biopsy results came back benign! Hooray!

So where are we right now? She will likely have chronic sinusitis for the rest of her life, managed by meds as needed. She still has the hole in the roof of her mouth, which the vet thinks will close on its own in the next two months or so. We are going to try her on a trial anti-viral med to see if the sneezing will taper off a bit, and the vet thinks it will aid in the hole closing on its own. If the hole does not close, we will be doing surgery to stitch it.

Martha is not up for adoption at this point. We want to be sure she is in the best possible shape before moving on — although word on the street is that her foster family is absolutely smitten with her and just may be a foster fail, which would be just fine with us! Thank you for awarding us the emergency medical grant. It enabled us to provide Martha with the care she needed and deserved.

St. Louis Senior Dog Project: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

A custom orthopedic brace and related vet bills

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant allowed St. Louis Senior Dog Project to help one of our special-needs dogs get a custom orthopedic brace for his badly damaged front leg. Diesel’s front-leg injury was causing him pain and the orthopedic brace purchased with the emergency medical grant money provided by the Petfinder Foundation has given him comfort and mobility.

How many pets did this grant help?

One dog (Diesel)

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Diesel is a very sweet 2-year-old Aussie/border collie mix who had a rough start in life. Back in April, Diesel’s owners left him outside for over a week while they were out of town. Scared and alone, Diesel jumped a 30′ retaining wall and shattered his right rear leg and left front leg. He was picked up by Jefferson County Animal Control and immediately taken to Ivan Animal Hospital for emergency surgery to repair his rear leg. Ivan Animal Hospital attempted to cast his front leg with the hope it would heal on its own. Diesel’s family returned six days later, found out what had happened, and were upset by the outstanding medical bills. Unwilling to pay, they surrendered Diesel to St. Louis Senior Dog Project. He spent a month and a half in the hospital recovering from surgery before transitioning to his foster home.

Diesel spent four months undergoing physical therapy to help rebuild muscle mass in his rear leg. The rear-leg fracture has finally healed and the bone is still remodeling. Although his mobility has greatly improved, the vet says that Diesel will never regain complete use of the rear leg.

After weighing different options for treatment of the front leg, Veterinary Specialty Services of St. Louis made a custom orthopedic brace for Diesel. Since receiving his new brace, Diesel has been able to go for long walks and his mobility has dramatically increased!

A special thanks to the Petfinder Foundation for providing St. Louis Senior Dog Project with emergency medical grant money that enabled us to get a custom brace made for Diesel. Diesel and St. Louis Senior Dog Project greatly appreciate your grant!

Broome County Humane Society: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The money was used for medical supplies and treatment for two animals who were brought to/abandoned at the Humane Society with significant injuries, including emaciation, parasite infestation, flea infestation, and life-threatening blood loss.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We were able to devote the funds to two animals who were in need of immediate help. The first was a schnauzer mix by the name of Shadow who arrived at the Humane Society emaciated, infested with fleas and parasites, and with minimal body hair and a yeast infection through her skin. In addition, she was in need of bloodwork to determine the best course of action for a mass that was present on her chest. Thanks to her exams, it was determined that Shadow would not need the mass removed, as it was not a threat to her health. Pain medication, joint medications and eye medications were additional supplies that were needed to help with Shadow’s road to healing.

In addition to treating Shadow, the funds were also used for a dog who was abandoned at our facility bleeding profusely from his penis. Delta received a medical evaluation and treatment which included sedation and monitoring to ensure he would not die from blood loss. We were able to treat Delta’s condition with topical treatments, including warm compresses as well as pain management. Once Delta was cleared and showed no sign of further tissue damage to the urethra, we were able to get him neutered with no complications and place him up for adoption.

How many pets did this grant help?

Two

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

When Shadow (first and second photos) was brought to the Humane Society and began her treatment, our organization reached out through social media to find her a foster home where she would be able to rest and get stronger in a home environment. Erin came to Shadow’s rescue, took her under her wing and helped her through her treatments, including rehabbing her and teaching her how to move again without the matted hair and large amount of fleas. Erin has decided that she will be adopting Shadow, pending her clearance from the vet.

Delta (third photo) is currently available for adoption since his medical treatment. Delta is one of the cuddliest dogs at the Humane Society and has healed wonderfully from his treatments with no complications. We hope that Delta will find a home soon where he can run and play and blossom in a new life! Meet Delta: http://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/40762836

Paws for Life Utah: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The grant was used to pay for the medical expenses for Red, a doberman pinscher who needed emergency surgery for a bilateral perineal hernia. The total cost for the surgery, with our discount, was $2,447.24. Your $1,000 grant saved his life. It made the decision for us to proceed with his emergency surgery possible.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Your grant truly saved Red’s life. Without it, we were faced with the choice of putting him down or trying to quickly fundraise to save him. Because he was so urgent, it was critical that we had funding for part of this procedure, as it was beyond our medical budget and obviously unplanned. The original estimate was up to $3,300, which would have prohibited us from rescuing any other pets who needed medical care. This grant allowed us to not only save Red’s life, but to continue to rescue at-risk shelter pets in the months of January and February.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Poor Red was abandoned in the middle of nowhere near Heber City, UT, with huge swelling around his anus. When he came into our program, we immediately took him to our local vet, Wasatch Animal Clinic, where they diagnosed him with a perineal hernia and said he was critical. They did not have the capability to perform the surgery and said we needed to bring him to a specialty clinic. He was then rushed to Advanced Veterinary Care in Salt Lake City, where they examined him and scheduled the surgery for the following day.

The surgery was a success and Red recovered nicely after spending a night at the clinic. He went into foster following his surgery and the family adopted him! We are so grateful to the Petfinder Foundation for your lifesaving support! We have attached pictures of Red and also of the bill for his surgery. Thank you so much from all of us at Paws for Life Utah!

Paws for Life Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The grant was used to help with the very high medical bills (over $2,200) for a cat requiring eye surgery.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The generosity of the Petfinder Foundation helps us continue to save more lives and ensures the health and care of adoptable pets.

How many pets did this grant help?

One cat

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Shortly after intake, it was noticed Veronica was having some disturbing green discharge and watery eyes while living at Petco as an in-store cat. It seemed like a mild URI, so she went into foster care. Veronica started some eye ointment, and her eyes cleared up a bit. After finishing her 10 days of eye ointment, Veronica still would get occasional discharge, but both eyes appeared normal. Then one day her foster mom came home from work to find Veronica lethargic, not interested in food, and both eyes completely swollen. She was rushed to the vet and began a new round of eye ointment and antibiotics.

She began improving, but then then things once again went downhill. Her right eye was becoming normal, but her left eye was so swollen you could not see the globe of the eye, just a swollen third eyelid. The vets could not determine what was causing these issues, but continued medications, antibiotics and eye ointments.

Finally, once the swelling cleared up, it became apparent that her eye was badly damaged. The globe of her eye looked cloudy and unrecognizable (second photo). After speaking to a veterinarian, it was determined she needed a specialist. An appointment was set up, but days before her appointment she developed a “pimple” on her cloudy globe. The day of her appointment, the ophthalmologist ran several tests, and did a very thorough exam and determined Veronica’s eye had actually ruptured. The globe was now cloudy and underneath all that cloudiness was filled with debris from what used to be her eye.

Surgery was scheduled and Veronica had her eye removed. The ophthalmologist believed that Veronica will recover wonderfully, and be a happy, one-eyed kitty. However, the vets, specialist and the rescue are all still unsure of what could have caused this in the first place. A biopsy of her eye will be sent out for histopathology.

The adorable caged picture of her in a Detroit-area animal shelter (first photo) quickly made her Paws for Life’s “poster child.” It saddened us to think that she would likely be passed over a lot for adoption due to her having only one eye.

However, after her surgery, Veronica (renamed Kiwi) was adopted by her foster family! Here is their story: “She was the perfect addition to our home. Only having one eye hasn’t slowed her down one bit. She loves shoulder rides, so much so that she’s always trying to climb up my husband. When she was small, she liked to sleep on my husband’s face at night. Now she weighs 9 lbs. and I’m happy to report that she never grew out of that habit 🙂 Her favorite toy in the world is a little spring that she will chase around our wood floors for hours. She has even learned to fetch. We recently found that she LOVES to watch the TV show Planet Earth. She will sit on the couch and binge watch Planet Earth on Netflix. Unfortunately, in December the vet found that her lymphoma (the root cause for her eye issue) had spread to a few lymph nodes and her spleen. Kiwi is now going through chemotherapy treatment and is responding exceptionally well.”

Outcast Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Funding was used for a dog named Olaf who was struck by a car and left to die on someone’s lawn. Olaf had several thousands of dollars in treatments and testing, including a CT scan and an MRI.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant enabled us to do testing that we otherwise would have struggled to afford.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Olaf was found on a lawn after being struck by a car and left to die. Outcast Rescue helped him get out of the shelter and to the hospital for much-needed treatment. Olaf had more than 10 fractures in his skull, some being displaced and actively bleeding, as well as a dislocated leg. Olaf underwent extensive treatment, including the placement of a feeding tube. After three weeks of no improvement, an MRI was performed where the results were devastating: Olaf’s brain and spinal cord had severe swelling and hydrocephalus. After consulting with our team of veterinarians, it was decided the kindest thing to do was to humanely euthanize him. We were all by his side and are beyond heartbroken over the outcome.

Roanchar Ranch Draft Horse Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

We used the grant to purchase a compression sleeve for Jesse, a 16-year-old Belgian with chronic progressive lymphedema, a chronic swelling of the extremities.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant allowed us to purchase a compression sleeve that restored Jesse’s quality of life.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

When Jesse came to our rescue he could barely bend his right rear leg because his chronic progressive lymphedema, or CPL, was so severe. He was uncomfortable, withdrawn and his muscles were wasting away. We knew that if we did not reverse some of the effects of the CPL, his life would be compromised. After conducting some research and speaking with our vet, we decided that a compression sleeve was the best chance Jesse had at a better life. The results we have witnessed have been nothing short of amazing. Within a week, we could see a difference in the size of his leg, and today, both of his legs are almost the same size.

Jesse is no longer withdrawn, but is an active, alert boy who is able to jog with the rest of the herd. In fact, on cold days he has been seen bucking, chasing and playing with his herd-mates. It is all a direct result of the compression sleeve that we were able to purchase with the grant. Thank you for allowing us to restore Jesse’s spirit.

At this time, Jesse is still not available for adoption due to other health conditions we are managing, but we have attached photos documenting his progress. The first two photos are his intake photos and the last photo was just taken yesterday. It shows the incredible improvement that he has made.

Pound Pets, Inc.: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The money was used towards Blue’s surgery.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Blue needed major surgery and therapy afterwards for his back leg. He went through surgery and water therapy for six weeks.

How many pets did this grant help?

One

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Blue came to us as a stray. At the time he was not using his back leg and we noticed that it had been quite some time, as it was quite noticeable that the muscle mass in one leg was much greater than the one not being used. Blue needed surgery. The end of the femur bone that fit into the hip had died due to trauma. They went in and removed the dead part of the bone with the understanding that the scar tissue would form a “faux” hip joint. One leg would be a little shorter than the other. After surgery, Blue was on crate rest for six weeks; after that he started laser therapy and then water therapy. Blue is no longer available. He was adopted by a medical student. He is finally beginning to develop some muscle mass in his back leg because he is now using it.

Happy Tails Rescue Inc.: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The money was used for the vet care of Dolly, a senior Chihuahua with a huge breast tumor.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped us take wonderful care of one of the many senior pets we help. Because of grants like this, we are able to help more senior dogs and dogs with expensive medical needs.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Senior Chihuahuas like Dolly with huge tumors rarely make it out of the shelter. Dolly was down to her last days, but because of the generosity of the Petfinder Foundation grant, we were able to take Dolly into our program and get her the vetting and surgery she required. She’s been adopted by her foster family and is loved and cherished.

Northwoods Animal Shelter: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The $1,000 grant was used to pay for a portion of the surgery to repair Sarge’s fractured left front leg.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant money allowed us to send Sarge to UW Madison for orthopedic surgery following a gunshot wound to his head.

How many pets did this grant help?

One

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

In the early morning hours of Jan. 11, 2018, Sarge was found lying in the middle of a rural road with a broken leg and a gunshot wound to his head. A kindhearted man was on his way to work and thought there was a dead animal in the road. He then realized that the animal wasn’t dead. The kind man and his wife called the police and waited with Sarge until help arrived. Trooper Weesner and Deputy Schiavo (third photo) arrived on the scene, loaded Sarge into the patrol car and took him to the Four Seasons Animal Hospital, where he was stabilized and treated for hypothermia.

The fact that Sarge was still alive is a miracle! This amazing dog loves everyone he meets. Despite his painful injuries, he is always wagging his tail and giving kisses to his caregivers. At this time, Sarge is two weeks post-op and is doing great! The vet team at UW Madison was phenomenal and our local veterinarian, Four Seasons Animal Hospital, was amazing as well. Sarge is now recovering and will have a follow-up appointment at the end of March.

Patriots for Pets Rescue and Shelter, Inc.: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Emergency surgery on a dog who had twisted intestines. Without the Emergency Medical Grant, we would not have been able to save this dog.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

See above.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Maggie had surgery for an ileus [intestinal] blockage. The surgery cost $1,797.13, which was way in excess of what we could afford. Maggie had come to us about a week earlier with a litter of 10 puppies in tow and developed the condition. We hand-fed the babies and the surgery was required to save her life. The surgery was 100% successful and Maggie and her puppies have been adopted.

Mutts in a Rut Rescue, Inc.: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The Emergency Medical Fund money was used to repair an oral-nasal fistula (a hole in the gum) for a rescued dog name Tulip.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped pay for necessary surgery so that Tulip could go on to find a loving adoptive home.

How many pets did this grant help?

One

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Tulip was rescued by Mutts in a Rut Rescue from Cleveland Animal Control. She was picked up as a stray in horrible condition. She was missing most of her fur. It was determined that she had ringworm. And she was found to have an oral-nasal fistula — a hole in her gum where a tooth had been. Thanks to the Petfinder Foundation, the fistula was repaired. She grew back her fur and it was determined that she is actually a Sheltie! She was adopted five months after she was rescued by a loving family who adores her.

Friends of Michigan Animals Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Oui Lee, an injured Chihuahua who had an older fracture that had to be repaired. The total cost of surgery was $1,874.74.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Friends of Michigan Animals Rescue (FMAR) is a no-kill, nonprofit shelter in Belleville, MI. We are state-licensed but not state- or government-funded. FMAR raises every dollar to support the shelter and for the care of our shelter dogs and cats. Major surgeries are less common and are usually over our budget. The Emergency Medical Grant helped tremendously by covering over half the cost of Oui Lee’s orthopedic surgery.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Oui Lee (lovingly nicknamed Wheels) came to our shelter in July of 2017. He was originally a rescue dog from Atlanta, GA. When he was approximately 4 months old, he was caught in the wheel of a wheelchair, which fractured his right rear leg. He was treated in Georgia; however, once he was transferred to us, we were aware that something was not right. We had him evaluated by our orthopedic surgeon, who found that surgery was necessary but could not be completed until Oui Lee was at least one year of age. Wheels stayed at our shelter until ready for surgery, which was done in October of 2017. He had a medial collateral ligament repair, a tibial tuberosity transposition, and patella luxation. He had physical therapy and water therapy for six weeks after surgery to improve movement and muscle tone. It has been three months since his surgery and he is doing wonderful; the vet expects him to make a full recovery as long as he is walked daily to keep that leg mobile and improving.

Oui Lee was adopted by a retired woman who walks/runs daily and was a perfect match for Wheels. Thank you again, Petfinder Foundation, for your support of shelter dogs and cats!

Cochise Canine Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Medical care/surgeries for Bella (hernia repair and spay) and Buddy (leg amputation.) Of the $693, $482.73 went to paying for Bella’s surgery, with the remaining $210.27 going toward Buddy’s leg amputation.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant enabled us to move forward with two surgeries which were immediately needed, and alleviate the suffering for these two animals.

How many pets did this grant help?

two

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Due to their need for extreme medical care, neither dog will be listed for adoption until they are fully healed. Bella (first photo) arrived in December 2016 from the euthanasia list at Maricopa Animal Control. Her two hernias were so severe that it was difficult to find a surgeon in southern Arizona willing to operate on her. We found a surgeon, Dr. Brett Cordes, in north Scottsdale, who performed the first of her surgeries in February 2017. They were unable, at that time, to spay her due to the invasiveness of the original surgery. They did remove her spleen, however, as it was compromised by the hernia. At that time, he let us know that she would eventually need a second surgery to further repair the hernias. On Jan. 2, 2018, she was brought in for an ultrasound to see what needed to be done. It was discovered that during her healing time, her ovaries had moved into the rent caused by the smaller, remaining hernia. On Jan. 23, she was again brought up to Dr. Cordes’ offices at Arizona Animal Hospital, where the second surgery was performed. Although her muscle walls are still more fragile than we would have liked, it is hoped that this will be the last of her needed surgeries.

Buddy’s (fourth photo) left front leg had been broken MANY months ago … but he was never taken to a veterinarian to have the leg splinted. As a result, Buddy has lost use of the misaligned leg. To make matters even worse, just a few days before Christmas, his owners (he is on their sofa in the picture)
dumped this 2-year-old Chihuahua at Pinal pound. While many other little dogs were adopted or rescued, Buddy languished in fear and discomfort over the holidays. Although Cochise Canine really had a “full house,” we just could not, in good conscience, allow this little boy to suffer any longer!

Rockers Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The grant donation was used to help our rescue with expenses incurred from saving Century the kitten.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We received a $1,000 emergency medical grant to help our rescue with Century the kitty’s case. She had to have a leg removed and then later needed emergency surgery again at the ER vet, and then had to stay at our vet over a week recovering and fighting a fever. The total expense was around $1,800 and it hit our small rescue pretty hard. We have quite a few senior pets and even young ones who rely on us, so the grant was a huge help to keep us on our feet.

How many pets did this grant help?

It helped us with Century’s vetting expenses, which in turn helped our rescue to save even more lives.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

A few months ago we rescued an injured kitty and named her Century. She was abandoned at the CenturyLink Center with a badly broken leg. Century had to have her leg amputated. A few days later she had to have emergency surgery at the ER vet. She then spent around a week at our vet with a fever, struggling to recover. This little kitty pulled through! Our little rescue was left with almost $2,000 gone in DAYS! We were in our back-up funds with several animals still under our care. Our seniors were our main concern. We knew that if anything else large came up, we’d have nothing. We reached out for grant help, and the Petfinder Foundation awarded us a $1,000 Emergency Medical grant! We literally had tears when we got the email of approval. Someone finally cared about Century and her life just much as we did. Words cannot describe the feeling.

I am happy to say that Century is now ADOPTED! Her mommy had a three-legged dog who had passed away, so when she saw Century she felt a deep connection. Century is alive, happy, and loved. Thank you to the Petfinder Foundation and to everyone who supports us. Not only did Century get to live, but our little rescue got to keep saving lives. THANK YOU!

Miss Gabriel Foundation: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Miss Charlie came to us very sick and ended up needing much more done than expected. These funds went to treat her skin condition, help pay for her vaginal hyperplasia surgery and her eye distichiasis surgery.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We only rescue sick dogs like Charlie, but this helped pay for some of her medical care, since most of the funds come from our pockets to pay for these sick guys. This grant helped us make sure all the sick dogs in our care got the treatment they needed instead of one sick rescue depleting all the funds.

How many pets did this grant help?

One directly, but it helped with all eight

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Miss Charlie says: “Hi, my name is Miss Charlie. I am a neglect case from Chowchilla, Calif. Doctors think I am 8 months old. I am a Presa Canario/American Staffordshire terrier/bulldog mix, according to my DNA test. A full DNA report will be given to my adoptive family, as will my complete health records. Here is my story from my point of view.

“I showed up on a stranger’s porch. He called for someone to come and get me. On Sept. 13, 2017, an animal control officer from the Madera County Animal Shelter came and picked me up. I was sick, scared and showing signs of physical abuse as well. ACO Michelle took me to see a vet right away and started me on treatment. I was placed on a treatment plan until a rescue could come get me.

“Shelter staffer Sandy put out a call for my rescue on the same day. Sandy knew to tag Miss Gabriel Foundation in the post. MGF responded on Sept. 14, asking about my condition and if any local rescues were coming to help me. No one was coming and no one was interested. As it so happened, a lady named Katie had found a paid transport that could take me as well as another rescue down to MGF, but it was the next day. MGF agreed to take me on if I could make the transport. Sandy and a lady named Debbie helped arrange for me to make the transport from one city to the other and on to MGF.

“Michelle drove me to the transporter named Cheryl to get me to MGF. I was in need of ongoing medical attention, so I was transferred to MGF on Sept. 15. I had a severe skin disease and was in a lot of pain. I suffered from corneal scarring, eye infections, long nails, tapeworms, diarrhea and swollen paws. I was demodex-positive. Finding out what was wrong with me and the treatments were the expensive parts. Now that I am done with my treatments, I can be adopted out to a forever home. Meet me: http://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/39783212”

Bullies and Buddies: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

For Popcorn’s eye removal surgery. He is a 7-year-old bichon mix whom we found in a high[-intake] shelter, completely dirty and with a severely infected eye.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant covered the surgery to have his infected eye removed.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Hi there, Popcorn here! I was dumped at a super high[-intake] shelter already bursting at the seams with dogs and a lot of them were way younger than me, so I didn’t have much of a chance to get out. A kind lady called a “rescue person” was there to pick up one dog. I could read her mind; she was thinking, “Just get the one you are here for — we have too many as it is. Don’t look, just get one and get out.” Well, somehow I mind-melded her and she happened to glance over at me and, well, she started crying upon seeing the shape I was in. I was dirty, matted, and flea-infested and my eye was completely infected. So back to the front desk she went and that day she left with me and that other dog — who basically saved my LIFE.

I was having eye problems, so they took me to an ophthalmologist and found out that I need surgery to remove my bad eye. It was not a great time for the rescue to be hit with such an expense, but I learned that good rescues make things happen for us dogs in need.

A big thank-you to all the humans who donated and to the Petfinder Foundation for helping us raise enough money to cover my eye surgery! The good news: I got my sutures out and I am healing perfectly. I don’t even know I lost an eye because it wasn’t working anyway! I feel so much better now! Thank you, kind humans, and may your universe be filled with love and good things! Meet Popcorn: http://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/39015576

Live Love Animal Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

To pay for an MRI to provide a more definitive diagnosis for Jersey’s hind-end weakness and mobility problems to refine a treatment plan.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant funds are of great help to our rescue dogs as we work to provide them the best medical care and help them achieve the best quality of life possible. We provided Jersey with tumor-removal surgery, medication, hydrotherapy and acupuncture to help her recover from her prior trauma. The cost of the $1,500 MRI was a significant hit to our rescue, as we have several other medical cases in the rescue. The grant allowed us to give Jersey the best shot at getting better.

How many pets did this grant help?

One: Jersey the great Dane.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Jersey was found as a stray in Los Angeles, starving, with a cantaloupe-sized mammary tumor. She was also barely able to walk and could barely stand with her hind legs. We pulled her into Live Love Animal Rescue right away. We were able to get her tumor removed, but her inability to walk has been more difficult to treat. The grant provided helped us get her an MRI, which showed us the extent of her injuries. The vet told us this was one of the most severe cases of damage he had ever seen. We also consulted with a neurology team at UC Davis to explore whether there was a surgical option. It was clear that Jersey had massive spinal damage, multiple herniated discs, and spinal compression, and the UC Davis team warned that the damage had been present for so long and was so severe that just lying down and breathing was increasing the damage.

We and her foster mom were, of course, devastated by this diagnosis. Jersey was pampered with lots of treats, on bed rest and watched over by her foster siblings (see pics). We wanted to have a wonderful Christmas with Jersey, but on the morning of Dec. 20, 2017, Jersey woke up with a bad case of bloat. Her foster mom raced Jersey to the vet, where bloat was confirmed. Jersey passed away being held by her foster mom and being loved by the vet and staff, where she was a favorite.

This is obviously not the outcome we wanted, but we are grateful that, after what must have been a really tough life, Jersey knew love, comfort and companionship. We are so grateful for the Petfinder Foundation Emergency Medical grant that allowed us to provide Jersey with the very best medical care that we could.

Happy Hills Animal Foundation, Inc.: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The grant money was used for veterinary treatment of Wobbles, a 10-lb. poodle mix. Wobbles entered our facility with a severe injury to his left rear leg. The leg was dangling and required immediate treatment. Evaluation at our veterinary office (Tysor Veterinary Clinic) revealed that the little guy had been the victim of a gunshot wound. The bones were shattered, with bullets embedded in his pelvic bone. On Nov. 9, 2017, Wobbles underwent amputation surgery of the rear left leg with partial hip removal.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant helped our nonprofit rescue/shelter provide the proper veterinary care and treatment that Wobbles required. He is recovering well and is currently in foster care with his potential adoptive family. Wobbles and Happy Hills Animal Foundation, Inc., are very thankful for this grant so that we were able to help this sweet boy overcome the horrific abuse that he suffered and move forward with his love of life.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Wobbles was found wandering in and out of traffic on a busy North Carolina highway. A concerned citizen scooped him up out of danger, only to realize that he was suffering from a severe rear-leg injury. He was brought to the Happy Hills Animal Foundation, Inc., shelter facility, where immediate triage care was started. Wobbles was transported to Tysor Veterinary Clinic, where x-rays revealed a tragic injury: Wobbles had been the victim of a horrific gunshot wound to his left rear leg.

X-rays showed where the large bullet had torn through his leg, shattering bones and finally lodging deep in his pelvic bones. The tissue damage was healing, although the leg had atrophied and the bone damage was so severe that amputation was the only real option at this point for little Wobbles. The pain and suffering that this tiny 10-lb. poodle mix must have gone through with this injury is unimaginable!

Happy Hills Animal Foundation, Inc., was committed to providing this sweet boy with the best medical care possible. This type of injury was well above our already stretched veterinary budget for 2017. With the help of the Petfinder Foundation and private sponsors and donors, Happy Hills Animal Foundation, Inc., was able to provide this little fellow the lifesaving treatment that he required.

Wobbles underwent amputation surgery on Nov. 9, 2017, to remove his mangled rear leg, along with a portion of his hip. This little fellow came through the surgery better than expected and thrived under the care of Dr. Joanna Tysor, DVM, and the staff at Tysor Veterinary Clinic. He is making a remarkable recovery and enjoying life in his foster-to-adopt home, where he will never again have to worry about being subjected to the horrific abuse from his past. The future is bright for little Wobbles thanks to the Petfinder Foundation, and all the supporters of Happy Hills Animal Foundation, Inc.

Paws for Life NC: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Hemi, a male kitten with a broken leg. The vet diagnosed a broken leg and determined the only way to treat him was to amputate. The funds provided by the Petfinder Foundation paid for his amputation surgery.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Grant funding for Hemi allowed us to pay for his required surgery — he was in pain and would not have been able to be adopted without the leg amputation. The funding paid for Hemi’s treatment, and an added benefit is that we were still able to pay for basic medical care for other cats in our foster program. The $535 grant allowed us to reallocate funding that would have otherwise paid for his care to instead pay for eight spay/neuter surgeries for kitties in our foster-care program.

How many pets did this grant help?

This grant helped one pet, and Hemi now has a chance at a normal life in a loving home. Indirectly, we were able to pay for eight spay/neuter surgeries for cats in our program since we did not have to pay for Hemi’s surgery.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Hemi was 2 months old when he met his Paws for Life NC rescuer and foster mom. He is a gorgeous male tabby kitten. He is what we like to call an “All-American” — he has a sweet temperament and is great looking, but Hemi had a rough start in life. In early June, Hemi was seen running on the highway, frantic to find a safe place. He was saved by construction workers who stopped traffic to try to catch him. Unfortunately, he ran under a car, and after searching for several minutes, the good Samaritans had to give up and let traffic resume.

Unbelievably, Hemi had managed to jump up underneath a car and hide from everyone when they were looking for him. He hitchhiked all the way back to the car owner’s house, where he hid in the garage for a couple of days. After a few days, the car owner realized he was in the garage. The car owner contacted the lady who lived next door, who is a cat foster for Paws for Life! They were finally able to catch Hemi because he got caught on some sticky pads for bugs.

After they cleaned him up, as he was walking around checking out his new home, the foster realized something was wrong with his leg. He was taken to the vet, who told us that he had a broken leg. The vet was going to try and pin his leg so it could heal, but it was broken so badly that the only option was to remove it. Throughout this ordeal, Hemi maintained a good attitude and was loving to all who encountered him. He adjusted to life as a tripod and enjoyed playing with his foster-mates.

Hemi was lovingly cared for by his wonderful foster mom, who helped him heal and experience a safe, happy home. In early November 2017, Hemi was adopted by his furever family. He is loved and cherished by his family and, thanks to Paws for Life NC and the Petfinder Foundation, Hemi is living his happily-ever-after.

Last Chance Animal Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The Emergency Medical Grant funds were used for a cat named Sheldon. Sheldon need dental surgery to alleviate pain he was having.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant made Sheldon’s surgery possible. For our rescue, it is hard to raise money for surgical procedures and almost impossible to do so for cats.

How many pets did this grant help?

One

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

This grant helped Sheldon. Sheldon was a Hurricane Matthew refugee who was brought to safety to our sanctuary in South Carolina. After several months, we finally found a foster for him in New York. We were excited to find a forever home for Sheldon when we discovered he was in pain due to issues in his mouth. After several days of trying to raise the money needed for his surgery, I found the Emergency Medical Grant and immediately applied. This grant completely funded Sheldon’s surgery and we were finally able to find Sheldon his forever home. Sheldon now has a great home and is no longer in pain thanks to this grant! We cannot thank you enough!

Halfway Home Cat Rescue, Inc.: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

A heart surgery procedure that one of our kittens needed to remove a ligament stemming from the heart that was wrapped around the kitten’s lower esophagus. This was causing her to not be able to swallow most of what she ate, causing her to have stunted growth.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped is afford the surgery Angel needed to survive. Without it, she would have died eventually due to the ligament around her esophagus strangling her.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Angel had had problems regurgitating her food from the time I took her into foster care in April 2017 when she was three weeks old. As she grew, I noticed this to be a habit, a problem and a concern. Initially we believed it was megaesophagus. We took her to a specialist at Tufts in Grafton, MA, where we used all of the money we had fundraised for a CT scan. This scan revealed Angel’s condition, which the cardiologist wanted to schedule for surgery sooner rather than later. Two weeks later, Angel received the lifesaving surgery and has been fine ever since! Due to all she had been through, she has not yet been spayed. She will be after the first of the year and then we will work on finding Angel the purrfect forever home!

Metro East Humane Society: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The $450 grant from the Petfinder Foundation was used to offset the costs of surgery for one of the cats in our shelter. Billie required surgery on her eyelids to remove several cysts.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

In June 2017, an animal eye specialist performed a conjunctival resection and superficial keratectomy on both of Billie’s eyes. They also did a liquid nitrogen cryosurgery on Billie’s left eyelid in an effort to remove the hair follicles and prevent the growth of additional cysts. Billie’s left eye is now perfectly clear and, while the vision in her right eye is impaired, her quality of life is greatly improved. Before being made available for adoption, all animals at MEHS are spayed/neutered, microchipped, and have their vaccinations brought up-to-date. The additional costs incurred for special medical needs such as Billie’s are often prohibitive. Without support from the Petfinder Foundation, we would not be able to meet these critical medical needs.

How many pets did this grant help?

This grant provided the necessary medical care for one cat.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Billie is now approximately 14 months old and still waiting for her forever family. Despite limited vision in her right eye, she is a typical mischievous young cat. She is frequently found in the director’s office or “helping” at the front desk. Billie’s profile is available at: http://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/37327028

Cavalier Rescue of Florida, Inc.: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The Emergency Medical Grant was used to pay for chemotherapy treatments for Honey, a Cavalier King Charles spaniel, who was rescued by Cavalier Rescue of Florida.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant allowed us the opportunity to provide Honey with lifesaving medical care to treat her cancer. As an all-volunteer rescue without support from endowments or tax dollars, we must fundraise to provide care to all of our rescues. With the support of the Petfinder Foundation, we were able to help Honey without delay.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Honey is an almost 9-year-old Cavalier King Charles spaniel who arrived in rescue from a breeder/hoarder situation having delivered multiple litters of puppies. Upon arrival she had a visible tumor that needed to be removed. The tumor was biopsied and she was diagnosed with a grade-3 mammary-gland adenocarcinoma. Through consultation with the oncologist, it was determined that chemotherapy would offer Honey’s best chance at a long life without a recurrence of cancer. She would need between five and six treatments, delivered over a four to five months. She began her treatments in September 2017 and had her fourth treatment on Nov. 21, 2017. She is responding so well, so she will require only five total treatments. Honey will be available for adoption once she is given clearance from her doctor. We hope that by the New Year, Honey will be ready for a new forever family.

We greatly appreciate the support of the Petfinder Foundation, because the cost of Honey’s overall medical care, from arrival to adoption, will exceed $5,000. This donation made it possible for us to provide her with the care she needed immediately. We were able to fundraise the rest while also providing care to the other Cavaliers in our care. Honey now has an excellent opportunity to live much longer, and we will make sure she is treated like a princess!

Speak St. Louis: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The money was used for an amputation.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant came at the right time. We had an adult Australian sheperd who needed an MRI, which in turn revealed that his leg would need to be amputated. This a very costly surgery.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Reggie, a 1½-year-old Australian shepherd, needed our help. Reggie was picked up by Animal Control as a stray with an injured leg. He was not able to bear any weight on his leg. We scheduled a visit with an orthopedic surgeon, who determined that he would need an MRI to see what was going on. The MRI showed that Reggie had a fragmented coronoid process, or FCP, resulting in a significant bone fragment that needed to be removed from his elbow. If this were the only culprit of Reggie’s pain, it would not be a big deal; however, it was also discovered that he had a deformity in the bone, near his elbow joint, contributing to his lameness and discomfort. Unfortunately, Reggie had already developed extreme arthritis in his lame leg; so even with extensive surgery, a lengthy recovery, and a lifetime of meds, Reggie would still suffer pain throughout his life. Therefore, Reggie’s team determined that amputation would be the best plan to help him live a happy, pain-free life.

Reggie’s surgery went perfectly. His transition to being a tri-paw has been seamless. Since he consistently carried the lame leg that was causing all the pain, he was already used to walking on three legs. It turns out his foster family fell in love with him and decided to adopt Reggie. He is currently living a happy life with a wonderful family and Aussie sister.

Cats Meow Feline Fosters, Inc.: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

We were contacted about a cat unable to use its back legs. The money was used toward his vet bill for surgery and treatment. The surgery allowed him to keep both legs, because one was broken and the other was dislocated.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant money helped us pay the large vet bill for one cat, thus relieving the strain on our finances so we could continue to help others as well.

How many pets did this grant help?

One

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We received a call about an injured cat that was unable to use its back legs. Not knowing what we would find, we agreed to come and look at the cat. We were told that he was a stray in the vicinity of a small business and trailer park. He was immediately taken to our vet to determine the extent of his injuries. Examination and x-rays showed that one leg was dislocated and the other was broken, requiring surgery to pin the bones back together. On faith that we could get some donations to cover his bill, we agreed to proceed with the surgery.

We were able to collect some donations toward the bill, but not the full amount, so we were happy to discover the availability of a Petfinder Foundation grant for emergency medical treatment. Our new patient was named Wayne, which has turned out to be perfect for him. They told us at the vet what a good-natured cat he was there, and we have found him to be a perfect gentleman in his foster home as well. After surgery and follow-ups with the vet, he was cleared for unlimited activity. He now enjoys running, playing, and even some limited tree climbing! He is friends with all of the other foster cats and especially with one of the kittens. Meet Wayne: http://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/39034088

Camp Cocker Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The money was used for the treatment and medical care for Mr. Rogers (new name: Rutley).

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This medical grant helped with removing tumors and medical treatment for Mr. Rogers.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Mr. Rogers, now named Rutley, was a senior dog who was rescued from a shelter in Southern California. He had been dropped off in the overnight drop box in horrific condition. He had a large, open tumor on his ear that was infected and infested with maggots (third photo). Although he was in terrible pain, he showed us rescuers his kind eyes, and still wagged his tail with appreciation. He enjoys car rides, and gets super excited for a 9+-year-old gentleman! Rutley has found his forever home! He enjoys going to the beach, chasing balls, is completely house-trained and has such a zest for life. His new family just adores him!

S&D K9 Rehabilitation: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The Emergency Medical Grant covered the cost of a femoral head ostectomy surgery for Nicky, one of the dogs in our rescue this summer.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Nicky was in need of surgery in order to correct an old injury that was causing her pain. She was able to receive the surgery with the assistance of the grant. She has recovered extremely well. She is now living with her forever family and she is pain-free.

How many pets did this grant help?

This grant helped one of our rescue dogs, Nicky.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Nicky came to our rescue from the Prince George’s County shelter, where pit bulls are not adopted out to the public due to breed bans in the area. We noticed that Nicky favored one of her back legs and took her in for a consultation with one of our veterinary partners. We were informed that Nicky would need FHO surgery, also known as a femoral head ostectomy, in order for her live without pain. We were determined to make sure Nicky received the surgery she needed and the Petfinder Foundation grant allowed us to improve Nicky’s quality of life. She received her surgery on June 26, 2017. We provided Nicky with therapy to help her recover and heal. She is now pain-free and was adopted into a wonderful and loving forever home where she has a canine brother who is her best friend.

St. Joseph Bay Humane Society: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The Petfinder Foundation generously gave an Emergency Medical Grant to our shelter for a young dog named Star. Star needed urgent medical care because of a lame front foot.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This Petfinder Foundation grant allowed our shelter to schedule major surgery for sweet Star, a young pup who desperately needed a better quality of life. Without the Petfinder Foundation’s generosity, our shelter would have needed to do special fundraising to help cover the cost of Star’s surgery. This would have delayed her operation and medical care.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Star was an adorable and friendly 6-month-old Australian cattle dog mix who was brought to our shelter as a stray. She had what we thought was a broken front foot because she was unable to use her paw. Her poor paw was covered with wounds and sores from Star dragging it on the ground while she was homeless. After a full examination at the vet, we learned that her lame foot was due to irreversible nerve damage. It is possible that Star had a birth defect. The vet recommended an amputation. He felt it was the only long-term solution to provide Star with a “normal” and happy life. Sadly, the day before surgery, Star unexpectedly passed away. We were all heartbroken, but had faith that Star was running freely on the other side of the Rainbow Bridge. So twinkle, twinkle, little Star, like a diamond in the sky. Show us your light, and twinkle, twinkle all the night. We will miss you.

North Beach PAWS: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

We are very grateful to the Petfinder Foundation for sponsoring dental surgery for Bugatti, the tuxedo cat. The surgery went well and without a hitch. Bugatti was placed in foster care until he recovered, then returned to the shelter. His fine ways and lovely temperament made him a favorite. He has since been adopted and placed in a loving home.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant paid for dental surgery. Bugatti was spared a significant amount of pain. In addition, the intervention helped him return to being the sweet, loving cat that he was before the constant pain — in other words, the intervention made him adoptable.

How many pets did this grant help?

One. It saved his life and allowed him to be adopted.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

After months of being in pain, which made him reclusive and ill-tempered, Bugatti was surrendered by his original family to NB PAWS. With the Petfinder Foundation’s support, NB PAWS took Bugatti to the vet, who recommended dental surgery. Bugatti got the dental surgery he so desperately needed. He immediately returned to being the friendly, sweet cat he had been before he got ill. Bugatti was placed in foster care until he was fully recovered. Once he came back to the shelter, he became a favorite of the Cat Cuddler and many visitors. Bugatti has been adopted and found a loving home. We are all very pleased with the outcome. The photo is of Bugatti with his new mom.

Safe Haven Rescue Kennel: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Grant funds were used to cover a portion of the medical care to a “free to good home” Craigslist-rescued Chihuahua we named Cinco in honor of his rescue on Cinco de Mayo.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

When he arrived, poor Cinco he could hardly open his mouth or eat due to his lack of dental care. Thanks to the generous opportunity with the Emergency Medical Grant, he received a full dental (13 teeth extracted) and was neutered.

How many pets did this grant help?

The Petfinder Foundation’s promise of lifesaving veterinary care to help a dog become adoptable came true! Cinco is no longer in pain and was quickly adopted (he’s now named Dante) and doing very well! Thank you, Petfinder Foundation!

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Listed on Craigslist as “free to good home,” this little boy was rescued May 5th — Cinco De Mayo! Cinco could hardly open his mouth or eat when he arrived. After a full dental (13 teeth extracted) and neuter, he is now a happy, healthy, pain-free and ADOPTED dog named Dante! He is very grateful and honored to have received a $316 Emergency Medical Grant from the Petfinder Foundation!

Humane Society of McCormick County, Inc.: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

This money was used to help Bobo. When he was found, he was dragging his front leg. After several months of trying, Bobo did not regain the use of his leg, so it was amputated. The surgery was a success and Bobo is a very happy, playful dog.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Bobo’s surgery was very expensive and this grant enabled us to have his front leg amputated.

How many pets did this grant help?

This grant helped Bobo, a dog who had to have his front leg amputated.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Bobo’s surgery was supported by an Emergency Medical Grant from the Petfinder Foundation. We can’t thank you enough. On March 6, 2017, we received a call for help with a dog found with sticks duct-taped to his front leg. We rushed over and found a friendly dog (now named Bobo) who was struggling to walk. We discovered that Bobo had no feeling from his shoulder all the way down to his paw, causing him to drag his right front paw underneath him, which was wearing away his fur and skin.

After being examined by two different veterinarians, Bobo was diagnosed with brachial plexus avulsion. This is an injury where the arm is pulled so hard that the nerves are actually yanked out of the spinal cord. We think that Bobo was most likely hit by a car some time ago. We fashioned a sling for Bobo to keep his leg from being scraped on the ground. All avenues of nerve regeneration were explored, giving him every chance to avoid amputation. One of our volunteers, Libbi, who is a retired physical therapist, worked diligently with Bobo and tried several techniques. The last attempt was to use a TENS/EMS unit, but we saw no improvement.

After seven weeks of therapy and several veterinarians’ opinions, we made the decision to have Bobo’s right front leg amputated. The estimated cost was $1,500, so we starting looking for grants. Bobo had his surgery and he stayed at the vet’s office for the week. His recovery required restricted activity and more trips to the veterinarian’s office, but he is feeling much better. Bobo can actually walk more easily without having to drag that leg underneath him.

Thank you, Petfinder Foundation, for helping Bobo! Bobo is still available for adoption. Meet him: http://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/38542167

CATS Cradle Shelter: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

This was an Emergency Medical Fund grand used to save the life of a cat who was completely blocked and in need of emergency surgery.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Without this grant, we would not have had the funds to save Soul’s life. He had a $980.70 surgery at the emergency clinic (and that bill did not include the medications he needed once released). That is a large amount of money for a nonprofit rescue, and we were thrilled to be awarded this grant to help us get Soul well again so he can hopefully find a forever home.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Soul was brought into the emergency clinic to be euthanized because his owner did not want or have the funds to get him medical treatment. When Dr. S. saw what a nice young boy Soul was, he knew he would be adoptable if he could find a rescue to take over his care. That is when Dr. S. called CATS Cradle Shelter to see if we could rescue him from being euthanized. We have seen many urinary blockages treated successfully and had no issue taking him. That is when we applied for the Petfinder Foundation Emergency Medical Grant. Thanks to the Petfinder Foundation and this grant program, Soul is well on his way to making a full recovery and will be placed for adoption as soon as we can get him eating enough on his own to go into a home. Soul is a finicky boy and we are still trying to get him to adjust to his new food.

Outcast Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

This Emergency Medical Grant was used for Samantha’s emergency hospital care and amputation surgery.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped us to cover some of the hospital expenses accrued during Samantha’s hospital stay.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Samantha’s story is one that is just shy of a miracle. Samantha, who is an approximately 1-year-old Jack Russell Terrier, was struck by a train in front of her owners. Her injuries were too much for them to handle and they surrendered her to a high[-intake] shelter. Outcast Rescue saved her and immediately brought her to the hospital, where she was treated for her injuries. She had her front leg amputated as it was too damaged to fix. Samantha then went into foster care, where she recovered.

Now here is where yet another miracle happened. A few weeks after surgery, Samantha’s body started changing. Because she couldn’t undergo anesthesia for several weeks after having her leg removed, her spay was delayed. With Samantha’s ever-growing midsection, she was seen by our vet for an ultrasound. Samantha was indeed pregnant — and more than halfway through. This past Monday, after undergoing an emergency C-section, she welcomed two baby boys: Sebastian and Stanley. Samantha was also spayed during her C-section. Samantha has an adoptive home that is patiently waiting for her once she has finished nursing her babies.

Little Tails Rescue, Inc.: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The $500 grant was used to pay for Kiki’s hospitilization for parvo.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It helped greatly as it paid for almost half of what we spent on her treatment. She came out of the county shelter very sick. Once she recovered from parvo, she was quarantined at our vet, then went to a foster home. She is currently listed for adoption. We can’t thank you enough.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Kiki was rescued from our county shelter. Unfortunately, she was housed in a pod where another dog tested positive for parvo. She was set to be euthanized and we were able to get her in the last few hours. She tested positive for parvo at our vet and was very ill. With treatment, she made a full recovery. As we had no open foster that could take a dog with parvo, she was quarantined at our vet and, once she was okay to leave the vet, she went to a foster home. Since Kiki is only a year old, she also went through five puppy obedience classes donated by a local facility. She is doing very well and is listed for adoption. We hope to find her a great home. Thank you so much for your grant. We are so appreciative. Kiki would not be alive today without all the help we received. Meet Kiki: http://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/39412544

Little Shelter Animal Rescue and Adoption Center: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The money was used to pay for medical expenses for a puppy who contracted the Parvovirus.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant saved this puppy’s life; without the funds she would have died.

How many pets did this grant help?

This grant helped one puppy.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We received a phone call from a former adopter, stating that a neighbor of hers was having difficulty paying for dog food. We have a program called the Animal Soup Kitchen (A.S.K.), which provides sick, disabled, impoverished and elderly pet parents with free pet food, vaccinations, spay/neutering and medical care for their animals. We went to deliver the dog food and we found 15 puppies and two adult female dogs in the man’s yard. It seems that his two female dogs had recently delivered the pups. The pups were all skin and bones and needed immediate medical care. We evaluated the situation and decided it was best that we take the pups to our shelter. We provided the man with food and set up an appointment with our veterinarian to get his dogs spayed.

The pups were given fecal and blood tests and appeared to be in good health except for being undernourished. They tested positive for parasites and negative for Giardia. They were treated for the parasites and have responded well to their meds. Three of the puppies became lethargic, were vomiting, and had diarrhea. They were brought to the veterinarian for evaluation. They were diagnosed with Parvovirus. They were hospitalized for two days and received the appropriate course of treatment. They were discharged and returned to our shelter. They were placed in our isolation unit, receiving medications prescribed by the vet. The total cost for their care was $4,210.78. Puppy C’s cost was $1,853.39.

We are happy to report that Puppy C, along with her siblings, recovered. Puppy C was adopted soon after and found her forever home. Carly and her new family are very happy.

Connecticut Humane Society: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The Petfinder Foundation Emergency Medical Grant was used to support orthopedic surgery for George, a senior shepherd/hound mix who was rescued and brought to Connecticut Humane by a local animal control officer.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Connecticut Humane has a wonderful and talented full-time veterinary staff that treats a broad spectrum of pet illnesses and injuries. That said, specialized surgery like the one that George required for his leg is outside their realm of expertise. This grant enabled George to receive the care he needed from an outside orthopedic specialist. The senior pup had gone through so much in his life, and access to this surgery was a matter of quality of life. Thank you!

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

George was on the run. The 8-year-old pooch was understandably panicked and confused—he was hurting from cuts on his body, and his hind leg wouldn’t work as he tried to run around town. It took three days, but Plainville Animal Control Officer Donna Weinhofer was able to rescue him and finally get him the help he desperately needed. It’s unclear what kind of trauma left George so badly injured, but the lacerations appeared as though they may have been inflicted by a knife. To start, he needed x-rays for his leg and treatment for the gashes. He later had his leg surgically repaired by an orthopedic specialist. Fast forward a few months and the German shepherd/hound mix was ready to find a forever home, having received veterinary care through CHS with help from the Petfinder Foundation’s $1,000 grant.

With limited financial and medical resources, ACOs are rarely able to provide routine preventative care or treatment for medical conditions, and more extensive care is cost-prohibitive. That’s why CHS offers pro bono adoption and medical services to pets from animal-control and rescue partners—everything from spays, neuters and vaccinations for healthy pets, to complicated surgeries for health conditions. Sometimes they go back to their original facility for adoption, and other times, they’re adopted through CHS. Thanks to CHS’s partnerships with ACOs and other organizations, more pets like George are given a second chance.

George was fostered by ACO Weinhofer, and as soon as he was medically cleared, he was adopted into the home of a loving family in Pennsylvania, where he now happily lives with his pet parents and his two other puppy siblings. He keeps all of his fans updated on his Facebook page: http://bit.ly/2wO4L8h. And thanks to the grant funding and generous donors, the veterinary department will have room for the next George who arrives needing a healing touch and a second chance.

Longmont Humane Society: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Stray cat Red was brought to Longmont Humane Society after being hit by a car. Because Red’s injuries were significant, emergency care and surgery were administered that same day. Red was hospitalized and held by the shelter for a mandatory five-day stray-hold period, after which she was nursed to recovery in a medical foster home. Her injuries included a broken lower jaw, lacerations to her face and right hind area, and a hemorrhage to her right eye area. Red was pregnant and had no collar or identification, and no known owner. Emergency grant funds were used to care for Red.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Funds granted by the Petfinder Foundation helped save Red’s life and were used as follows:
1) Assessment of injuries (initial exam and radiographs) – $140
2) Emergency surgery to repair jaw and lacerations – $120
3) Medications – $117.67
4) Hospitalization/shelter care – $100
5) Feline leukemia/FIV testing – $12.99
6) Medical foster care – $345
7) Three recheck exams during healing – $67.50
8) Surgery to remove wire from healed jaw and extract broken tooth – $50
TOTAL: $953.16

How many pets did this grant help?

This grant helped save the life of one very special cat, Red.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Red was brought to Longmont Humane Society on March 31, 2017, after being hit by a car the night before. The damage to her face was significant. Our veterinary team went to work repairing Red’s jaw and giving her the best possible chance at a full life in an adoptive home. Red went to a loving foster home to heal and get the care she needed. Nearly a month later, the wire that held her jaw together was removed and she was soon ready for adoption. Red, now called Lexus, was quickly adopted. Her adopter declared Lexus her “soul kitty” and is so proud of the care she received and her resilient spirit.

Animals-R-Family: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

See below.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant saved Bo’s life. Bo needed to have his tail amputated ASAP due to having a mast-cell tumor at the base of his tail. Without the tail amputation, the cancer would eventually have spread and killed Bo.

How many pets did this grant help?

This grant helped Bo and saved his lie after he was diagnosed with a mast cell tumour on his tail.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

The $1,000 great was used to save canine Bo’s life. Gentle giant Bo was diagnosed with a mast-cell tumor on his tail. His tail needed to be amputated and the tumor sent for biopsy. The cost of the amputation and biopsy was $1,700. The $1,000 grant made it possible for him to have the amputation, as we did not have the funds to cover the full cost. Bo is super sweet, loving and gentle. He loves kids and female dogs. He has perfect house manners and loves his tennis balls more than anything. Meet Bo: http://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/21921781

Apollo Support & Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The grant money was used for the medical care of a Chihuahua named Wendy.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped us by providing medical care that was needed in order to make Wendy available for adoption so she could be spayed and get blood work, x-rays and more.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Wendy is still available for adoption, as she was on hold for a while due to her health. She has not been spayed yet as we are trying to get some weight back on her after a bought of not eating and feeling well. We used the funds to get her multiple rounds of blood work, x-rays, medication and more. The first vet we took her to thought she had heart failure, so they performed x-rays and blood work and listened to her heart during an exam. There was no coughing present, but she had lost weight over the last few months and has a heart murmur, so we all agree that it must be true. The medication did not make her feel well and she wasn’t gaining weight, so we took her to a second doctor to get another opinion.

Through the second blood work and examination, they determined she did not have heart failure and took her off of her medication. Right now she is on no medicine, and is eating only wet food so that she can try to gain back the weight she lost. Once she gains the weight back we will see if she can finally be spayed and get her dental done that she still desperately needs. During that time, Wendy also had a skin infection that she had special spray for, as she was licking her legs constantly.

Wendy is a very little girl with a big personality. She does take a while to warm up to other people, as she lived with a mentally disabled person in the past who yelled at her often. When she gets scared she will fall over on her side. The good thing is that, over the last months that we have had her, she has come out of her shell a lot. She gets excited when her foster comes in the room and is all tail wags! She likes other dogs but can be a bit picky over food sometimes. Wendy has a deformed arm, most likely due to an old break from when she was a puppy, but it does not cause her harm or really disable her much from moving around. She can still jump up on a couch or a lap with ease. Wendy is doing well going to the bathroom on puppy pads and likes to cautiously explore the back yard as well.

Meet Wendy: http://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/38986242

Humane Society of Morgan County: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The money from this grant was used to help three dogs: Bridgette, Aiden and Rush. Rush had severe skin issues and the other two had dental work done on them.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This helped us to be able to treat these issues that needed to be taken care of so that they could be adopted.

How many pets did this grant help?

Three

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Rush came into us from Animal Control with very severe skin issues. The skin issues took several months for us to resolve. We had to change her diet several times and had to give her a bath every week. With the help of this grant we were able to find out the exact problem that she had. She was adopted by a great family on a farm for her to use all of her energy.

Little Shelter Animal Rescue and Adoption Center: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Emergency Medical Grant

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant saved their lives.

How many pets did this grant help?

A dozen puppies.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

“Little Shelter Animal Rescue is extremely grateful for the help of the Petfinder Foundation,” says Executive Director David Ceely. “Thanks to the Emergency Medical Fund, Little Shelter Animal Rescue was able to save a dozen lives that would have been lost, and to us that is priceless.” This grant enabled our specialized-care puppies to receive the treatment they needed and they now will live happy, healthy lives as beloved family members. The Petfinder Foundation’s mission is to help ensure that no adoptable pet is euthanized for lack of a home, and Little Shelter couldn’t agree more! Little Shelter has been dedicated to saving abandoned dogs and cats and placing them into loving homes since 1927.

All Aboard Animal Rescue & Shelter: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

We used this grant to get specialized surgery for a little cattle dog/greyhound mix who came to us with a leg that had been fractured for a couple of weeks and was healing incorrectly. The vet thought that she probably got hit by a car and then was dumped/found by the shelter and they did not have the funds to care for her. When we brought her in, we immediately did x-rays and saw how bad the break was. We tried to put the bone back into place so that it could heal properly, but it was already starting to fuse since it had gone untreated for so long. We consulted with a specialist who said he could try just cutting the bone and fitting it back into place or he could amputate the leg, which was probably our best route to go in his opinion. We immediately booked the surgery and got the dog treated.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Without this grant we would not have been able to book the surgery and bring in a specialist to get the dog fixed up. Our vet did what he was able to, but the break was too bad and not healing correctly, so no longer in his scope. We had just treated three heartworm-positive dogs and removed a dog’s toe within the last few weeks and our medical funds were completely depleted. This grant helped us get this dog the care that she needed quickly so she would not suffer any more pain or stress.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We received a plea from a small Eastern Colorado shelter that does not do adoptions about a young cattle dog mix who was injured and needed rescue in order not to be euthanized. We immediately tagged her and arranged transport. When we received little Rachel, she was not bearing weight on her back leg and was clearly in pain. We x-rayed her leg to find that it had a pretty severe fracture and had most likely been broken for at least a few week.

Our vet tried to put the bone back into place, put a cast on her and she went into foster care. We redid the x-ray a week later to see no change in the leg, so we consulted a specialist. He said that he could remove part of the bone and she would just have a shorter leg or he could amputate the leg, which he recommended as the best treatment. This was out of our vet’s scope and we had to bring in the specialist to do it, which made the surgery much more expensive, but we wanted to make sure Rachel got the care she needed. The surgery was completed and Rachel went back into foster care to continue healing.

Not long after that, Vikki saw Rachel’s story online and was moved by it. She and her other dog came to meet Rachel and see if she would be a good fit for them. They immediately fell in love with her and took her home that day. Rachel has been thriving in her home and you wouldn’t even know she was missing a leg.

From Vikki: “I have renamed her Azelin, which is supposed to mean ‘saved by God.’ She seems happy and does well with her brother. She chewed through three harnesses before we realized that, at some point before I brought her home, she had a harness burn on her shoulder, so she now has a collar and many new chew toys. She jumps on the furniture and the amputation does not seem to affect her except on the leash.”

Without this grant it could have been weeks or months before we could raise the money needed to get Rachel/Azelin her surgery, but because of the Petfinder Foundation we were able to get her treated quickly and into her forever home!

Utah Valley Animal Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

To cover costs for Chester’s surgery. He had fallen out of the bed of a moving truck and fractured a bone. The family was unable to cover the costs of the surgery and opted to put him down. We stepped in and rescued the little boy!

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Covered the cost of an expensive surgery. Not paying out of pocket for this surgery freed up our funding to help other animals in need.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Chester received the surgical care needed. After a few months of recovery he was ready to find his forever home. A wonderful family adopted him and is providing him with amazing care! From his Petfinder profile: “Chester is a tender 11-month-old boy who tumbled out of the unsecured bed of a moving truck. After discovering how high his medical bills were, he was set to be euthanized. Luckily, Utah Valley Animal Rescue stepped in to help set his bones and make sure he had the best chance at a new life. His femur surgery went well and he now has a pin in place to immobilize his limb for six weeks. In this time, bone growth should allow the pin to be removed and Chester will be able to start being a carefree puppy again.”

To the Petfinder Foundation: We would like to express our gratitude at having received your generous and deeply appreciated grant of $1,000 to apply towards the medical costs for dear sweet Chester. Because of this grant, UVAR will be able to provide more ailing animals with the medical care they need and deserve. Once again, our most sincere thanks for helping us to better help them.

PupStarz Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The Petfinder Foundation’s Emergency Medical Grant was used to treat Clea’s knee. Clea had a torn cranial cruciate ligament and needed it stabilized with a tibial plateau leveling osteotomy, as well as a torn meniscus.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Though we put the $1,000 into Clea’s knee surgery, the grant helped us save many other dogs. The $1,000 given by this grant allowed us to pull 10 dogs from [an open-admission] shelter. This included their transport, spay/neuter surgery, microchipping, and vaccination.

How many pets did this grant help?

See above! Many!

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Clea is a 46-lb., 6-year-old boxer mix. She is simply a fabulous, loving, friendly, and balanced dog who would fit in with any household! She is very mellow but will happily play or take long walks. She will lie at your feet or next to you on the couch but is not needy. She loves any and all attention but is perfectly independent. Best of all, she is WONDERFUL with kids and totally unfazed by a house full of boisterous little ones!

Miss Clea knows the commands sit and come. She enjoys taking car rides, starring out the window watching life carry on. Clea is perfectly housetrained … score! In the house, she is very mellow. When appropriate, she’ll romp around the yard and chase a ball around. She enjoys hanging outdoors and patrolling the yard for squirrels. She could spend hours outside when the weather is nice. She is a fabulous walking partner and amazing on a leash.

Clea loves nothing more than to snuggle with people and get belly rubs. She adores being pet and receiving attention. You’ll find her snuggled up in bed with her favorite plush toy. She is friendly (but not jumpy) with everyone she meets and wins over all with her soulful brown eyes and wiggly, waggy body. She’s just a perfect dog! Meet Clea: http://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/37340095

Peak Lab Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Emergency surgery for Mick

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We were able to save the life of a senior Lab facing expensive vet care.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Mick, a senior Lab, came to Peak Lab Rescue very underweight and unable to eat. A vet exam found seven broken teeth and three oral masses that needed to be removed immediately. Mick’s mouth was so painful that he couldn’t even chew. Thanks to the Petfinder Foundation, Mick had surgery immediately. Everything yucky and painful was removed from his mouth. Mick made an almost immediate recovery — he started gobbling his food like a real Lab and gaining weight. Within a short while, Mick become a happy elder statesman. Thanks to the Petfinder Foundation, Mick was adopted by his foster, who is an experienced lover of seniors!

Tabby Tales Rescue, Inc.: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The money received with this grant award was used for the medical care of Mahi, a cat who has chronic bowel- and bladder-control issues. She has received two abdominal ultrasounds and an MRI, as well as consults with veterinary specialists in internal medicine and neurology.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant helped with Mahi’s medical costs.

How many pets did this grant help?

Mahi was the one pet for which we specifically requested assistance, so she is the one to benefit from the Emergency Medical Grant.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Mahi and her bother were orphaned kittens found by a good Samaritan a couple of weeks after Hurricane Matthew struck our area. Sadly, the little boy had no use of his back legs with no hope of recovery, so his rescuer made the tough decision to let him go peacefully. We immediately took Mahi into our rescue, but not long afterward noticed that she was consistently having bowel and bladder issues, and could not quite seem to get the hang of using the litter box. After a couple of emergency vet visits for severe constipation, Mahi went to see a specialist and was placed on several medications to alleviate her symptoms. We were able to successfully manage her bowel issues with medication and some diet changes, but her bladder emptying still remained unpredictable. During this time, we realized that Mahi was also deaf. We sought counsel with a veterinary neurologist, who performed a hearing test to confirm Mahi’s deafness. We also had an MRI completed to see if there were any structural or nerve-impingement issues that could be the source of her bladder-control problem. While there was a tiny spot that could be causing an innervation problem, we opted for a trial period of medication, which would give us an indication of how successful a surgical correction would be. Unfortunately, while the medication helped some, Mahi still cannot determine ahead of time when she needs to urinate. At this point, we will be trying one more medication to see if we can “train” her brain to recognize that she needs to urinate prior to her voiding. If not successful, we will try implementing a regular schedule in which we express her bladder for her, so she’ll be eliminating at an appropriate time and place.

On a positive note, Mahi is such a delightful, sweet and playful kitten, you cannot help but fall in love with her. Her delicate features, prominent ears and childlike wonder make her a pure joy to watch. Her bowel problems are completely manageable at this point with a consistent diet, regular feeding schedule and only occasional medication on an as-needed basis. We are hoping that someone will see this darling little girl and she will steal their heart, just like she’s stolen the hearts of our volunteers. She is still available for adoption to the most special home. Meet Mahi: http://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/38331713

Wyoming Dachshund and Corgi Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Parvo treatment for Franz, a Dachshund puppy

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant for Franz’s parvo paid most of the vet bill.

How many pets did this grant help?

Only one, Franz

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We pulled Franz from a Texas shelter on May 30. He started showing parvovirus symptoms on May 31. We got him to the vet and they did not think he would survive. Franz has a strong will to live and he beat the odds. He is now in foster care and quarantined for a few more weeks. Once he has the okay of the veterinarian, he will go up for adoption.

Ruff House Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Dental for Rufus

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

See below.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Rufus’s dental made him more adoptable. He is a senior shih tzu who desperately needed dental care. Since his surgery, he has found a wonderful forever home. He is happy and loved and his new name is Lenny! He is very grateful for the Petfinder emergency grant for his dental!

Pound Buddies Animal Shelter and Adoption Center: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Pound Buddies received an Emergency Medical Grant for $1,000 and we will use the money to help surgically correct a bladder issue with one of our dogs.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

See below.

How many pets did this grant help?

One

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Sahri is a very sweet dog who has a bladder problem that causes incontinence. We are fortunate to have found a foster for her, but because of this issue, folks are reluctant to adopt her. She now has an appointment at Michigan State University for July 11, 2017. We are on a cancellation list should something open up sooner. Meet Sahri: http://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/37427229

Humane Society of Warren County: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Funds from the Petfinder Foundation were used to cover a portion of the medical expenses for a kitty who was caught in a car engine. Expenses totaled $1,116. The Petfinder Foundation generously covered $1,000 of the those costs.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant from the Petfinder Foundation allowed the Humane Society of Warren County the resources needed to save the kitten’s life.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Rev the kitten was rushed to the shelter by a Good Samaritan during one of the agency’s rabies clinics. Rev was found in a car engine and was severely injured. His tail had been severed and he had two broken legs. Despite his injuries, he was very friendly. He was rushed to the vet. His tail was amputated and both legs were cast. One of the staff members at the veterinary clinic offered to foster Rev during his recovery. Instead of having to recuperate in the shelter, Rev was able to heal in the peace of a loving home. Rev’s foster family fell in love with him and became his forever family through adoption. Thank you to the Petfinder Foundation for making this possible.

Furry Friends: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Your generous grant paid the veterinary bills for Maggie, a year-old orange tabby, who needed extraordinary medical assistance over the course of five months.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The funding from the Petfinder Foundation enabled Maggie to receive the medical care she desperately needed, thus enabling her to live a long, happy, and healthy life in her forever home with her new adoptive parents. Her placement also allows us to open up a space for another cat in need of assistance and a permanent home.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Maggie, an adorable little orange tabby, was relinquished to us as a stray. She had extremely labored breathing, was malnourished, was sneezing continuously, had nasal discharge, and was infested with fleas and ear mites. She weighed only 5 lbs., two to three pounds less than she should have weighed. After numerous vet visits, x-rays, and several courses of antibiotics and steroids, it was discovered that she had a one-inch nasal polyp blocking her airway. The polyp was removed immediately and, after she recovered, Maggie was spayed and vaccinated.

Maggie is now living with her new adoptive parents. Her new mom tells us: “Tyler and I are so happy and grateful to have Maggie home and a part of our little family! I am so happy that you were able to get a grant to help pay her medical bills. I cannot express enough the happiness, love, and joy she brings to me; She is the center of Tyler’s and my universe. I made sure to take some time off so I could get some time with her as she adjusted. I think it definitely helped her that Tyler and I visited her every week at the shelter until she came home with us.”

“Maggie was a volunteer favorite,” says Furry Friends board president Jennifer Hart. “We are all worried about her health and were overwhelmed when the Petfinder Foundation stepped up to help pay her medical bills. Thank you!”

Stray Hearts Animal Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The $600 emergency medical grant was used to save the life of a pregnant dog.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant paid for the bulk of a $770 vet bill. Stray Hearts had a month to pay the $770 in full. We scraped together $100 in donations, but could not pay the rest in that timeline. The grant was a godsend to our rescue.

How many pets did this grant help?

One mother dog and her eight puppies.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Baby Girl was a stray who was taken in by an older couple. On April 1, 2017, Baby was pregnant, and was attacked by a dog or dogs who came into the yard. She was taken by Stray Hearts volunteers to Country Hills Vet Clinic, more than 45 minutes away, for emergency treatment. Dr. Melanie Greene came in late to care for Baby. Baby had multiple deep bite wounds on her rump and stomach (including a mammary gland that was torn open), and a canine tooth that was ripped from the socket. Baby Girl was in great pain and shock when she arrived at the clinic, but Dr. Greene gave her a pain shot and began IV fluids. Baby Girl stayed at the clinic for three days to get stabilized. She had several drain tubes, and then a final surgery to remove the canine tooth and have her gum sewn back in place.

A week later, Baby Girl had eight beautiful puppies, all healthy. Baby Girl is recovered and the couple have enclosed their yard with fencing to keep Baby Girl safe. Baby’s puppies will be sent to rescue, where they will be vetted and adopted. In addition, Baby Girl will be spayed, using funds a relative gave to have her vetted. A very happy ending for all. Thank you, Petfinder Foundation!

Chicago Animal Advocates: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

We used the grant to help pay for a brain MRI and spinal tap on a medical-mystery dog in our care.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We needed about $2,400 to do this procedure. We had spent so much on Bon Bon before this, trying to figure out what is going on. It had been draining our funds to help other animals in need. Each time we came up empty-handed with answers.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Bon Bon came to us over a year ago as an owner surrender. We quickly noticed he was having weird health issues: constant regurgitation, permanently dilated eyes, and odd tremor episodes. Nothing we did gave us an explanation. Our next step to hopefully get answers was to perform an MRI and a spinal tap. This was extremely expensive and a risk, since it still might not give us an answer. This was a bittersweet feeling for us. His MRI and spinal-tap results came back clean. The good news is, there is no cancer or neurological problem causing his issues. This gives us a good feeling that Bon Bon should have normal lifespan. Yet, we still wish we knew why this was happening and how to help stop it. Our vet thinks this is how he was born. We are now working on getting a Bailey Chair for him to help with the regurgitation. Overall, we are happy to know there isn’t something major causing his problems and that he can live a long, happy life. Now we are focusing on finding him the right home to care for his needs. He is truly a happy, sweet dog. Meet Bon Bon: http://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/37704657

Paws for Life Utah: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The money was used to pay medical bills for an injured kitty, Frankie (aka Frankenstein), who, sadly, crawled under a car hood to keep warm and, when the driver started the car in the morning, poor Frankie was caught. He suffered several injuries and a broken leg. After spending several months at our veterinary clinic (where he became a celebrity!), he was adopted by a loving woman and her sweet dog, and the three of them are now inseparable. He has had several surgeries, and the bills that are attached to this report represent a portion of his medical costs.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped us immensely in paying a portion of the medical bills for Frankie. The community is responding so positively to the support from the Petfinder Foundation, as they have been following his story. He is one amazing and loving cat! This grant helped us not only with this one kitty, but in communicating the mission of our volunteer-based organization and highlighting the type of live-saving work we do with the support of the Petfinder Foundation. They are more aware of the needs of homeless pets and how to find them on Petfinder.com.

How many pets did this grant help?

One directly, but many more pets in good will

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

A big THANK YOU to the Petfinder Foundation for granting us $1,000 for emergency medical funding for Frankie, the poor kitty who crawled under the hood of a car to keep warm and was terribly injured. The owner of the car had no idea that a sweet little gray-and-white kitten was under the hood of his car when he started it. Sadly, much of the kitten’s skin was torn and his leg was broken. After several surgeries and several weeks of rehab, his fighting spirit got him through the recovery process. He is now in a loving home with his new mom and a loving dog brother who adores him!

Saving Grace Rescue, Inc.: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Care for Astro, a kitten from a hoarder situation who had flea-powder toxicity that lead to seizures, permanent blindness and permanent ataxia. He was also severely anemic and malnourished, severely infested with fleas and earmites, and had an upper-respiratory infection.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant allowed us to pay for his emergency care, continuing medical care, neurological consult and basic husbandry. Astro has made a near-full recovery aside from the blindness and an amusing wobble. He is a happy, loving and playful kitten who will go to his new home this weekend!

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Little Astro was rescued from a hoarding situation. He was found blind and infested with fleas. He was unable to find food in the stench and was losing weight and near death when we got him. Astro cannot see and needs a bit more time to learn to balance, but he is full of love and affection and some serious quirks. As soon as he’s picked up, he goes limp in your arms. His eyes look healthy, but he is completely non-visual. Astro had two seizures in the first few weeks, but things quickly improved after he moved into his foster home.

After a much-needed flea bath, little Astro revealed his unique “abilities.” Josh Norem, Astro’s foster dad, combed out an insane amount of fleas. The little tabby was so grateful for the relief that he curled up in his lap, switched on his purr motor, and started catching invisible bugs in the air.

He has come far and is doing much better. He leaps around playfully every morning and is loving his new life with comfort, food and care. After getting up on the couch through the stairs, he wedges his legs snugly between the couch and the stairs just the way he likes it. Astro may be a bit trembly, but he wants his humans to know that he’s just as purrfect as any other kitty with all the joy and love he can offer.

UPDATE May 21, 2017: It’s been a long journey of healing. Astro was very fortunate to have an amazing foster home. Here he is going to his new home (last photo)!

Fayetteville Animal Protection Society: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

A cocker spaniel named Sadie’s double total ear-canal ablation surgery

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

When owners don’t seek veterinary care for ear infections (especially with spaniels), the ears can become permanently damaged. It’s extremely painful for the dog and requires an expensive and intense surgery to remove the infected ear canals.

How many pets did this grant help?

One: Sadie

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

At only 5 years old, little Sadie knew nothing but neglect. Someone likely bought her as a cute puppy and had not done any research on the needs of cocker spaniels, judging by the condition of her ears. Sadie’s owners were moving to Germany and instead of the life she had known with her family, she was dumped at Cumberland County Animal Control (a local [open-admission] shelter), not knowing where she was or what she did wrong. We had saved her on April 18, 2017, and discovered shortly afterward that her ears caused her an immense amount of pain. Poor Sadie needed a total ear-canal ablation (TECA) in both ears. When owners don’t seek veterinary care for ear infections (especially with spaniels), the ears can become permanently damaged. It’s extremely painful for the dog and requires an expensive and intense surgery to remove the infected ear canals.

One issue with our being a private, nonprofit, no-kill animal shelter is that we receive no government or state funding, but we couldn’t turn away poor Sadie. Even with the daily pain she was suffering, she is a sweet, affectionate pup who wants nothing more than to cuddle in your lap. The Petfinder Foundation stepped in and through their Emergency Medical Grant and support from our community, Sadie received the surgery she so desperately needed and deserved. We are so proud to say that she now is in her forever home, never having to wonder again if she’s loved.

St. Mary's Animal Welfare League: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Sampson had several teeth that were impacted that needed to be removed. Sampson was difficult to anesthetize because he suffered from a thoracic hernia when he was first brought into SMAWL. The estimate for Sampson’s dental surgery and treatment plan was between $1,231-1,354. The actual cost of the surgery was $1,164. The grant money provided to SMAWL was incredibly helpful and covered almost 100% of that bill.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

SMAWL budgets yearly for emergency procedures such as Sampson’s. Paying the full bill for Sampson’s surgery would have taken a large chunk from that budget and taken away from other cats that we could help in this year. However, because of the grant provided, SMAWL will be able to maintain our intake goals and help as many — or more — cats than we had budgeted for.

How many pets did this grant help?

One

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

My name is Sampson and I have super powers. I came from a hoarding situation with dozens of other cats until Animal Control rounded all of us up and took us away. The nice people from SMAWL chose me and some of my friends to go live at the Cat Castle. I was very skinny and I was hungry all the time but I didn’t gain weight. I went to live with a foster mom who tried to fatten me up but she noticed that I breathed really hard and after eating I often threw up. When I went to the vet for a check-up, she couldn’t hear my heart on one side. Everyone was pretty scared about that and took me to another vet for x-rays. The x-rays showed that most of my organs were in the chest cavity. My heart and lungs were on one side and my liver, spleen, stomach and some other stuff were on the other side. I was probably born with a thoracic hernia and when I was really little, my organs moved up into my chest. They stayed there and didn’t have enough room to grow normally. I was hungry all the time because there was not enough room for my stomach to get full. I couldn’t breathe right because my lungs didn’t have enough room to expand. I needed expensive surgery to fix the hernia and put everything back where it belonged.

While SMAWL looked for a way to pay for this, I started to feel much worse. I was at the hospital for evaluation when one of my lungs collapsed and I went into emergency surgery. The surgeon worked very hard to fix me. I had some tough times, but with my new foster mom, I gained weight – almost 5 lbs. – and got stronger. I had lots of tests and most of my troubles resolved over time and with medication. They tell me my liver enzymes are high, but nothing slows me down.

I’m happy, playful, loving and feeling fine. I love to play and sleep in the sun and I really love my food, but mom and my doctor say I need to be on maintenance now that I am at a healthy weight. I like to play chase and I especially love squeaky toys. I have a foster brother and we play chase every day. I take three medications every day – one pill and two liquids. I’m not really happy about that, but I mostly take my medicine well. I need to have bloodwork every six months.

I would really love a forever family. My medicine costs about $70 per month. I eat dry food and two small cans of food every day. Sometimes I eat some treats. I like tomatoes and buttered toast as special treats when mom isn’t looking.

Sampson has been with SMAWL for just over two years now. His foster mom loves him very much, but would love to see him in his own home. Meet Sampson: http://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/34548047

New Beginnings Animal Sanctuary: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

New Beginnings Animal Sanctuary received $500 from the Petfinder Foundation to help with the costs of medical care for one of our shelter dogs, Paddington Bear. These funds were used to cover his sedation and surgery, the treatment afterwards and the many medications he received, including Ketofen, Polyflex (ampicillin), Clavamox and Panacur Suspension.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped our organization provide expensive but necessary care for one of our shelter dogs. Without this grant, it would have been difficult for our shelter to find the funds to cover his treatment and medications.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

It was a cold December morning when a couple rushed into our clinic’s waiting room. They were clutching a small bundle of fur. As they handed him to our veterinary technician, we noticed how he didn’t move and was barely breathing. We thought the story of Paddington Bear wasn’t going to make it past the first page, but there he was, several weeks later, bouncing around the playroom with the other puppies.

The couple had told us they had found him on the side of the road. Our head veterinarian determined that he had been attacked by another dog or a large animal. His medical costs were immense. He had to be sedated for surgery and receive many different medications. Luckily, the Petfinder Foundation stepped in to cover the costs of his treatment. This was a huge relief, and in the end, Paddington pulled through.

He has now been placed with a loving family who are so grateful for the talent of our veterinarian and the Petfinder Foundation for bringing them together with their newest little boy.

Kentucky Dachshund Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Surgery for Rusty, a dachshund

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

See below.

How many pets did this grant help?

One, but he is special.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Rusty is a beautiful fellow who came from Christian County animal shelter with another dachshund, Rascal. Rusty is smaller, about 12 lbs., and his front paws were crippled. He could only hobble along on his front paws. He desperately needed surgery to repair the torn ligaments in both front paws. We knew he hurt since he didn’t like to be lifted. Rusty’s surgery was delicate and expensive. After several fundraisers, we were still short on funds to provide him a normal life. The Petfinder Foundation provided a generous grant of $1,000 to help Rusty have his first paw surgery on his right paw. Rusty is in recovery now with a cast for six to eight weeks. He will be able to use his paw normally within four weeks. However, we are still needing to provide surgery on his left paw. The vets have given us a discount if done in six months so we are working hard to make it happen. Thank you, Petfinder Foundation!

Meet Rusty: http://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/36747823/

Grey Face Rescue & Retirement: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The Emergency Medical Grant we received from the Petfinder Foundation was used for the ongoing care of Nellie, a dog in our rescue. She required medication exceeding $200 per month.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant helped our organization immensely by supporting the costs of Nellie’s medication. We were also able to buy a bulk quantity of her medication, which encouraged her foster to adopt her.

How many pets did this grant help?

One

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Nellie came to Grey Face Rescue & Retirement from Siouxland Humane Society in Sioux City, Iowa. Nellie was a young lady deserving of a second chance. At only 7 years old, Nellie suffered from CHF (congestive heart failure), urinary incontinence, a heart murmur and severe arthritis in her left forearm. Nellie received x-rays of her heart and lungs, x-rays of her extremities to determine the cause of her left forearm limp (which was determined to be severe arthritis), full-panel bloodwork, and urinalysis and a urine culture, along with a consultation by an orthopedic surgeon at VCA Feist and Forest Lake Clinic. Nellie is currently prescribed Pimobendan, Furosemide, Proin, Carprofen and Tramadol, which cost over $200 per month. Nellie was as sweet as can be and was looking for a home to call her own forever.

From her Petfinder profile: “Nellie is a beautiful, sweet old girl who is pretty laid-back and easygoing, which means she’ll transition really easily into any kind of household! She enjoys going for walks and will sit for a treat. She is a bit shy when she first meets you, but quickly warms up to you as long as you give her lots of love and belly rubs. She is not one who likes to play fetch; she would prefer to be by your side and just lounge around. Nellie does have a heart condition that requires medication every 12 hours, but it’s very manageable and she can still live a full, happy life!”

Nellie received the medical care she so much deserved and now lives happily with her foster family, who have adopted her 🙂

Pawfect Life Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The most amazing things in rescue happen when good people and good charities come together to save lives! Meet Brosie. This pup was run over by a truck that sped off and left him lying in the road.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This Emergency Medical Grant helped Brosie through a difficult surgery.

How many pets did this grant help?

One

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

A Good Samaritan ran to Brosie’s aid after seeing him get run over by a truck that sped off and left him lying in the road. They brought him to the Florence, Alabama, animal shelter, notifying the ACOs of what they’d witnessed. That’s when Pawfect Life got a call saying a stray had been dropped off with a crushed leg and could we please help? So we did! Brosie had an amputation and was fully vetted and came North. He met a wonderful family at our open meet-and-greet who were very interested in adopting him. Unfortunately, before I was able to invite them back to have their dogs meet Brosie, I noticed Brosie wasn’t walking right. Now, of course, he wouldn’t walk 100% right as a tripod, but something more seemed off — so off to the Sutton Animal Hospital we went! We did an x-ray, which confirmed that yes, there was a problem with the one remaining hind leg.

This was devastating, and so I had to call this wonderful family and tell them that Brosie wasn’t okay and that I needed to further vet him before I could say he was 100% okay to be adopted. They were very sad as they had felt an immediate connection with this sweet boy. I promised Brenda I would find a specialist and get Brosie the vetting he needed and that i’d stay in touch with her, but that it would most likely be some time until he was ready to go to a new home, because the fracture the x-ray revealed meant he would most likely have to have a femoral-head ostectomy on his one back leg (a surgery requiring that we cut off the top of the femur/thigh bone).

Brenda asked, well, will you be fostering him? I said yes, most likely, due to the care he would need. Then she asked about the bonding that happens between a dog and a person while going through a surgery and recovery as difficult as this, asking, well, what if she fostered him? I was stunned and speechless that this woman whom I had just met would care enough about this one pup that she would be asking me if she could help him through such an ordeal — and it would be an ordeal, because surgery on the only back leg this pup has wouldn’t be easy. These are the moments that I am most touched and vulnerable — that change my way of thinking and make me feel one with the world.

So on Oct. 1, Brenda came and signed a foster contract and took Brosie home. She brought him to all of his vet visits with the specialist and helped him through a difficult surgery, which he had on Nov. 8. And she helped him as he made a miraculous recovery, blooming with all the love and support she was giving him — every moment of which brought them closer together.

Brosie’s surgery was costly and the rescue needed help raising money to ensure this sweet boy had a chance. We reached out to the Petfinder Foundation, submitting for an Emergency Medical Grant to help save him. And they responded, answering our call for help with an almost $500 grant towards his care! Moment after moment for this sweet boy, daily miracles and the love of a family that transcends all, until finally, this month, that once lost and broken soul was adopted into his forever home.

I would like to thank the Good Samaritan who pulled him off the road and the folks at the shelter, including my friend Debby who called me for help, and all the veterinarians who helped save Brosie! I’d especially like to thank the Rolfe family for seeing how amazing this precious boy is — and for being the amazing people they are (much love to you, Brenda)! And to the Petfinder Foundation for being there to help save those most in-need, as just when I thought we would have no way to fund his surgery, you were there, ready and willing to help! Some things in life are just meant to be, and you, sweet Brosie boy, are that beautiful soul who brought everyone together and changed us forever.

Roanoke Valley SPCA: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The grant money was used for an amputation procedure for a dog who had a broken foot that had been causing pain for an undetermined amount of time.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped us by providing the funding needed to have the procedure for Pixie. Without the funds, we would have had a much harder time raising money for the procedure. The longer Pixie went without the procedure, the longer she endured the pain.

How many pets did this grant help?

One

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Pixie came to the Roanoke Valley SPCA on a transport from another county. When we took her off the van and placed her on the ground, she would not walk anywhere. At that time, we figured she was just scared, so we carried her to her cage. During her examination a few hours after her arrival, we found that she still didn’t want to walk on her front leg. We took her to Vinton Veterinary to have an x-ray of her leg. After close evaluation, we concurred that her leg was broken and had tried to heal without treatment.

Her leg had suffered a lot of damage, to the point that, after consulting with the veterinarians, we decided that the best option for Pixie would be to amputate the leg. This procedure is not cheap, and, fortunately, with the Petfinder Foundation Emergency Medical Grant, we were able to fund the operation. The procedure went well and Pixie was placed in our foster program so she could heal in a calmer environment.

After weeks of healing, Pixie was finally made available, and it turns out that her foster family had fallen in love with her so much that they had to adopt her. Pixie is now part of a loving family that spoils her to death!

Georgia Pet T.A.I.L.S., Inc.: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

See below.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Without the money, we would not have felt comfortable continuing to push the vet to save Barney’s leg. Financially, we were able to keep Barney at the vet for two weeks while he received two surgeries and several skin grafts and ultimately we were able to keep his leg. Thank you for helping us save this sweet boy!

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We had a very special hound/boxer mix who was approximately 1.5 years old. Barney was surrendered to our rescue after his owner left him on a cable tie-out during the day. The cable got caught wrapped around his back legs. He was left like that for so long that the circulation was cut off nearly the entire day to both rear legs.

The cost of his vet bills overwhelmed the owner and she surrendered Barney. Barney spent two weeks at our vet. There were a few days where we didn’t know if he would keep one of the legs because the damage was so severe.

The grant provided much-needed relief for us to continue to be able to treat him and believe that he could continue to fight. After two surgeries and several skin grafts, he is a healthy, happy boy who has recently been adopted! Thank you to the Petfinder Foundation for helping us save this sweet boy!

Bama Bully Rescue, Inc.: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The money was used to provide emergency medical care for a shelter dog. The dog was transferred to Bama Bully Rescue for emergency care and adoption placement.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We were able to save a puppy who might have otherwise been euthanized due to extensive damage to her paw, probably resulting in amputation of the foot. The amputation would have made her a less-desirable adoption prospect. The much-needed funds enabled us to provide emergency medical attention, and her paw was saved.

How many pets did this grant help?

One

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Morticia, a pit bull mix, was picked up as a stray in October 2016 and was placed in the Colbert County animal shelter in Alabama. She arrived with a severely damaged right front paw. The shelter did not have the resources to provide urgent care, and called Bama Bully Rescue for assistance. Bama Bully accepted her into our rescue, and transported her to Mercy Animal Hospital in Gardendale for treatment. The veterinarian, Dr. Metcalf, examined her foot to be sure that nothing was embedded or broken, and released her into foster care. The wound was quite large, and the scar tissue was causing an angular limb deformity affecting her ability to properly place the foot. Dr. Metcalf recommended cool laser treatments to promote healing and increase the pliability of the scar tissue. When the wound began to heal, one of Morticia’s toes on the right front foot began to necrose, and Dr. Metcalf removed the necrotic toe. She also eliminated an infected pocket of tissue close to the wound. Morticia continues to receive cool laser treatments in an effort to return the foot a more normal angle.

Morticia wants to thank the Petfinder Foundation for providing funds to treat her “jazz hands!” Morticia was rescued with a badly wounded right front paw. Without the Petfinder Foundation, Morticia might not have had the opportunity to become the beautiful diva you see before you! Both Morticia and I (her foster mom) want to thank Bama Bully Rescue and the Petfinder Foundation from the bottom of our hearts. Morticia has been adopted!

Homeless Animals Rescue Team: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Rescued from a rural shelter, Cindy had a leg that was deformed due to an old injury. After she was injured, her owner chose to refuse vet care and instead splint the leg. This led to fracture disease. Fracture disease, a complication of fracture treatment and immobilization, is defined as atrophy of bone, soft tissue, nails, skin, and cartilage. This condition is most often seen in dogs with quadriceps contracture, also known as quadriceps “tie down,” stiff stifle, post-trauma stifle stiffness, hyperextended stifle and hindlimb rigidity. Cindy’s “rigid” hind leg became a nuisance, getting in the way of her ability to sit, stand and walk. It also put pressure on her hips and caused her daily pain. HART used the Petfinder Foundation grant to help pay for Cindy’s amputation surgery and recovery.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The Petfinder Foundation grant enabled HART to give Cindy life-changing surgery without compromising the care of other needy dogs.

How many pets did this grant help?

This grant directly helped Cindy, but enabled HART to continue to rescue other needy dogs and cats.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Cindy suffered for most of her short life in silence. At just 7 months old, the young Sheltie mix was seized from a home where the residents thought they could care for a dozen dogs. Unfortunately, they couldn’t provide adequate care for any of them. When Animal Control found Cindy, she had a badly deformed leg that seemed to get in her way, making it difficult to walk, sit, and stand from a sit. Since Cindy had little control of her bum leg, it also tended to get caught and bump into things as she moved. Animal Control had been told that the leg was a genetic malformation, but as soon as HART saw a video of her, we thought otherwise.

We rushed to rescue Cindy (filling our van with a few other dogs and cats while we were at the shelter) and got her to our vet immediately. What our vet found was disturbing. X-rays indicated that Cindy had suffered a traumatic injury such as being hit by a car. Her left hip had deteriorated and was permanently dislocated; her hock (ankle) was completely fused and immobile, and her muscles and tendons were rigid. Based on the position of the bones in her leg, it was clear that somebody had known of her injury and put her in a homemade splint rather than seeking the medical care she so urgently needed. That means they had known she was suffering, they had known she must have been in terrible pain, but they didn’t get her any help.

The homemade splint allowed the bones to heal in abnormal positions and caused the muscles to freeze in place, making the leg a rigid peg (see first photo). It also didn’t address her dislocated hip, which must have caused her constant pain ever since the injury occurred.

Cindy was examined by an orthopedic surgeon on Oct. 21, 2016, to determine the best course of action to ease her pain. He realized immediately that her injured leg was causing pressure on her sciatic nerve, which compounded her pain and her difficulty walking and standing. Cindy had surgery immediately that afternoon to amputate her damaged leg, and a miraculous thing happened: Only hours after her surgery, she was standing and moving and HAPPY!

Within days she was running and playing with some doggie friends, and only 10 days later, she found her forever home with one of her very generous supporters. Now Cindy lives in sunny Florida with her new brother, HART alum Lucky (second photo), and she is enjoying every day of her life — pain free.

Molino de Suenos/Windmill of Dreams Animal Rescue and Sanctuary: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The $1,000 that we received for emergency care was used to pay for leg surgery for a rescued dog. Vladimir was rescued on the side of the road after being hit by a car. He had multiple fractures in his rear right leg that would not heal with a simple splint.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Vladimir had a 100% recovery and was successfully adopted by a family in Washington.

How many pets did this grant help?

One

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Vladimir is a 1-year-old Siberian husky who was hit by a car on a major highway in San Antonio, Texas. He was taken to a veterinary clinic and x-rays showed multiple fractures in his leg. The fracture was exposed (the skin was broken and macerated), increasing the risk of infection and incomplete healing. The options were orthopedic surgery with the use of pins/plates or amputation. We opted for the surgery. Vladimir had 100% recovery of his leg function and has been adopted.

Second Chance Bunnies, Inc.: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

We used the money received through the Petfinder Foundation’s Emergency Medical Grant to cover medical expenses for Alice, a bunny who developed an abscess from having teeth that were significantly overgrown and causing her great pain. She had teeth removed and underwent surgery to contain the infection, but in the end, she sadly passed away. More details are provided below.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Athough we lost Alice, there were still veterinary bills to pay. Our vet was very generous in providing a discount and even waived the fee for some of the services she provided. As a small rescue, large unplanned bills like this are not in our operating budget, so receiving the grant from the Petfinder Foundation allowed us to take care of Alice’s bills without impacting our ability to care for the other rabbits at our rescue.

How many pets did this grant help?

One: Alice

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Alice was a sweet bunny who was returned to our rescue when her family decided after a year they no longer had time for her. When she came back, we noticed her jaw was swollen and she likely had an abscess. We took her to the vet and found out that she had teeth that were significantly overgrown and causing her great pain. She had two removed immediately. Several days later, she underwent an additional surgery and had all the remaining teeth except one on the right side of her mouth removed to stop the spread of infection. An antibiotic pack was placed in the abscess area. Several days later, having shown signs of continued infection, she required an additional surgery to drain pus from the upper area of her mouth. All during this time, she required syringe-feeding and hydration and received pain medications and digestive support.

Alice was a fighter and we know she wanted to get better. Oftentimes when a rabbit is sick, they sit in a hunched position. Alice did not. She would periodically eat on her own and hopped around her X-pen. A recheck indicated the infection was improving, and we were hopeful that she would be able to recover.

Three days later, a staple needed to be redone and she went back to the vet again. When she came home, she seemed less enthusiastic, and was no longer interested in eating on her own. She continued to be syringe-fed, but did not like this. Sensing the infection was still not under control, we took her back to the vet, but sadly, she passed away on Oct. 21, 2016.

A necropsy showed the infection had spread throughout her body and affected her organs. Although she tried her best to recover, the infection was too severe for her to overcome.

American Eskimo Rescue of St. Louis: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Grant money was used to help with Dreamer’s expenses.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Dreamer is a very sweet 7-year-old American Eskimo. He has quite a story, and American Eskimo Rescue of St. Louis will be happy to share his story. Also we are very thankful to the Petfinder Foundation for being part of Dreamer’s story, especially for awarding a $1,000 grant toward Dreamer’s medical care. Dreamer came to our rescue in October 2016. Before that he had quite a past and now he has quite the future. He is now ready for his new home.

How many pets did this grant help?

one

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

In the beginning of July 2015, Dreamer was found as a stray and taken to Maricopa County Animal Care and Control in Phoenix, Arizona. On July 30, 2015, he was rescued by Eskie Rescuers United (ERU), a national organization for American Eskimo dog rescue across the United States. We in St. Louis, Missouri, work closely with ERU. However, there was a glitch. When Dreamer was found, he had a horrible open sore on his face. No one knew what it was, but it was an open wound (second photo).

There were many people in the American Eskimo dog community trying to save and rescue this dog. A representative from ERU was able to get to the shelter in Arizona and rescue him, only to be told that “the American Eskimo dog with the wound” had been put to sleep. The community was so saddened and disappointed. But later they would find out that he was still alive! So the ERU rep immediately pulled this boy from Animal Control with this horrible wound. He had been saved.

Dreamer was put into ERU’s foster program and taken to the vet. He was diagnosed with soft-tissue sarcoma. The vet recommended radical surgery, but a wonderful ERU volunteer in California said, “Send him to me and I will take care of him.” So Dreamer went to Palm Springs, California, to live with Adell, who fostered him and took him to her vet. The vet removed the soft-tissue sarcoma and saved Dreamer’s eye.

Dreamer lived with Adell until October 2016, when Adell, a longtime rescuer, became ill and was unable to take care of Dreamer any longer. American Eskimo Rescue of St. Louis had room and volunteered to take Dreamer in St. Louis. So Dreamer was put on a plane and headed to St. Louis. We wanted to give this boy a chance and help out since we had an open foster home. We picked up Dreamer and he went to the vet. He needed a check-up, dental, and grooming.

In the first part of November 2016, we noticed a growth in the same area as his first surgery. The growth was not there when we picked him up in October. It was growing at a very fast rate, too. We took Dreamer to a cancer specialist and were told it was the return of the soft-tissue sarcoma – the same tumor that was taken off in August 2015. With soft-tissue sarcoma, the tumor has tentacles like an octopus and is very hard to get rid of due to the way it reaches out. With this tumor, radical surgery would take most of the side of his face. Our options were radiation (at a cost of $5,000) or surgery, which would remove his eye and possibly part of his skull. We chose to have our vet “debulk” the tumor instead of performing radical surgery or giving Dreamer harsh radiation. Chemo was another option, but the type that Dreamer would take could make him sick (and was only 30% effective).

Our board decided to let Dreamer live out his life and not undergo harsh measures. Radiation and surgery would give him the same number of years he has left to live anyway (he is now 6 or 7 years old). Dreamer is such a great dog and he is loving life now.

So Dreamer has had two debulking (tumor-removal) surgeries – one in August 2015 and the other in December 2016. To date, there are no other tumors. We’ve done x-rays on his lungs and there’s no metastasis to that area, which is really good. Dreamer is in foster care at the moment. We have decided that he is ready for his permanent home and will make someone a very lovely family member. Dreamer is medically taken care of now.

Thank you, Petfinder Foundation, for helping with Dreamer’s medical costs and helping him to be the best dog he can possibly be. He is healthy, he loves people and other dogs, and he loves long walks. Dreamer loves to play with toys and go for car rides. Why ruin that for him, as there is no cure for the type of cancer that he has? There are wonderful medical treatments for dogs, but since Dreamer’s cancer is on his face, there is not much room there to do surgery at all. A rescue group cannot afford $5,000 for radiation and it could cause some negative side effects, such as loss of an eye or stroke, with no guarantee the cancer would not come back.

Take a look at Dreamer now (first photo). He has been such a lucky boy, with lots of people who love him. We don’t want to see him suffer by losing an eye, having a stroke, or going through extensive surgery that would only give him a few extra years to live. Right now, he could possibly go on to live his life out and he’ll have a very good quality of life now too. Again, thank you to the Petfinder Foundation for helping Dreamer, a dog with nine lives!

Dreamer is available for adoption and is considered special-needs. There is a chance this tumor could come back and if so he may need a third surgery. To date, Dreamer has had no symptoms. For more information on Dreamer and to adopt, please visit http://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/36564309.

Paws for Life Utah: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The money was used to pay a portion of the vet bill for an injured kitty, Frankie (a.k.a. Frankenstein), who sadly crawled under a car hood to keep warm and, when the driver started the car in the morning, poor Frankie was caught. He suffered several injuries and a broken leg. He is still at the vet receiving care but is expected to make a full recovery. He has had several surgeries and had to be sedated to change his bandages, as his skin lacerations were severe. He is doing so well and we are ever so grateful to the Petfinder Foundation for your support.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped us pay a portion of the vet bill for Frankie. The community is responding so positively to the support from the Petfinder Foundation, as they have been following his story. He is one amazing and loving cat, and is loved by many at the clinic. This grant has helped us not only with this one kitty, but in communicating the mission of our volunteer-based organization and highlighting the type of work we do, and how our community members can find our adoptable pets on Petfinder.com.

How many pets did this grant help?

One directly, but many more in good will.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

A big “Thank You” to the Petfinder Foundation for granting us $1,000 for emergency medical funding for Frankie, the poor kitty who crawled under the hood of a car to keep warm and was terribly injured. The owner of the car had no idea that a sweet little grey-and-white kitten was under the hood of the car when he started it. Sadly, much of Frankie’s skin was torn and his leg was broken. He is still under veterinary care at Silver Creek Animal Clinic and is expected to make a full recovery. Through it all, he is just a sweetheart, and the clinic says, “He is loved by many here.”

The Cats' Cradle Organization: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Duchess had a severe infection in her right front leg. She received high doses of antibiotics and steroids but the infection did not improve. She had her leg amputated ($600). During her recovery, the infection came back, but in her shoulder. She is still on a smaller dose of amoxicillin. The medicines and x-rays before and after surgery come to at least $500 so far.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This of course helped Duchess. She is getting around well on three legs but she is a bit apprehensive around people other than her foster mom and family. Getting this grant to help with Duchess’s surgery and medical cost involved allowed us to be able to have the funds needed to help 17 cats who were shot and used for target practice in our area. Duchess would not have received timely care without the grant.

How many pets did this grant help?

It directly helped Duchess.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Duchess, a 9-month-old black-and-white kitten, came into The Cat’s Cradle after she was found on the streets. She began limping in August and her leg was x-rayed. They thought it could be a small fracture and they wrapped it. However, it began swelling immediately and I had to remove the wrap. The swelling continued and she became lethargic. I took her back and they were shocked at the edema. She also had a high fever and a very elevated white blood cell count. They kept her and started an IV and heavy-duty antbiotics. After they shaved the leg, they saw two bite marks and we all realized she had been bitten by another cat. I believe this happened in the adoption center because she had been home for about a week when she began limping. I think she was bitten by a strange cat who didn’t know her when a cleaner let them out while cleaning. There have been no other bites before or since here.

They x-rayed the leg a second time 10 days after the first one and it showed that the infection had settled in the bone and damaged the joint so badly that amputation was the only option. They had to wait until her white count went down some before they could do the surgery. She did great after surgery but was at the vet’s office for a total of four weeks and came home on antibiotics. She has healed well and gets around fine on three legs. Her bill was around $1,000, even with discounts given to us.

Miss Gabriel Foundation: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

For Miss Chloe and her sons Mr. Dean, Mr. Ethan and Mr. Flynn: their medical bills and special feeding requirements for all of them throughout their care here in our rescue.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It helped us focus on getting Chloe back to health while keeping her newborns alive. We knew we had some help and could focus more on the care of this new family.

How many pets did this grant help?

4

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Miss Gabriel Foundation is a medical-needs-only rescue. We take in dogs who are too sick to survive in shelters and many are on the euthanasia list at these shelters due to the cost and care required to fix them up. Miss Chloe was found abandoned on a property where she, her 1-year-old son and her 7-year-old mate were all alone for about two months. Her son was found in a similar condition but not as bad as she was. Her son was placed in another rescue, as was her mate.

Miss Chloe (first photo) arrived at our rescue in poor condition. She had a skin disease and was emaciated, with dog-bite wounds to her face and back (second photo). We took her in for our routine veterinary check the next day, which we perform on all rescues to determine their health issues and formulate a treatment plan to bring them back to health. Part of this routine is lab work and x-rays. Chloe was found to have at least six puppies in her skinny belly and was due in about two weeks.

For some reason, she went into labor two days later. Four puppies were stillborn and three survived. Mom was placed on antibiotics and she tried very hard to nurse her puppies. Due to her own sickness and condition, she was unable to provide enough milk to support the surviving puppies. We had to step in and bottle-feed the puppies to supplement them until we were able to crash-course them into wet puppy food before their eyes and ears had even opened yet.

During this time, we found that part of the reason Chloe’s condition had spiraled out of control was that she had a food allergy. We had to place Chloe on limited-ingredient puppy food without any chicken or beef in it. We assumed the puppies may have had food allergies too, as her 1-year-old son also was suffering from allergies as well. This meant we needed limited-ingredients food without chicken or beef for the entire family.

Thanks to this grant, we were able to provide the medical care they have needed since they arrived. We have spent over $1,600 on the medical bills alone and about the same amount on their special food and formula. It is just my husband and me taking care of this family as well as eight other dogs needing specialized care. We are unpaid and as it is we have spent more than $16,000 of our own money on our rescue for the year 2016.

This grant made it possible to save this dog and her puppies. Chloe and Flynn (third photo) are still needing to find forever homes but Dean (fourth photo) and Ethan (fifth photo) have already found theirs. We DNA-test all our rescues as well as altering them, microchipping them, making sure all their vaccinations are current, their heartworm and Lyme disease preventatives are current they have a current county license.

The DNA tests say they are all purebred American Staffordshire terriers. All three boys have the same father and the boys are not inbred. It was important for us to find out, since Chloe was left on the property alone for two months with two unaltered males, her mate and her son.

Meet Miss Chloe: http://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/36795526
Meet Mr. Flynn: http://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/37321011

Sunshine Golden Retriever Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The money received from the Emergency Grant from the Petfinder Foundation was used to provide costly eye surgery to relieve the pain that Mickey, a recently rescued blind 8-year-old, was suffering. Mickey need to undergo enucleation surgery.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Due to the generosity of the Petfinder Foundation in helping with the cost of Mickey’s surgery, the financial burden for caring for Mickey was lessened. SGRR would not turn its back on Mickey and could provide the care he needed to life a pain-free life.

How many pets did this grant help?

This grant helped one of our recently rescued dogs, Mickey, receive the medical care he needed. Mickey had enucleation surgery and is now living a pain-free life and has been adopted.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Mickey was a recently rescued 8-year-old dog who was blind. Once he was in the care of SGRR, it was determined that Mickey was living with severe pain from his eyes. For Mickey to live a pain-free life, he would need to undergo enucleation surgery. Because of the generosity of a Petfinder Foundation grant, Mickey received that surgery and is now living with his bonded brother in an adoptive home. A very special family was found for Mickey and Magic. Thank you, Petfinder Foundation!

3rd Coast Labrador Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Mack’s veterinary care. The growth was hot to the touch and severely infected. In addition to his neuter and vaccines, he also had the growth removed and a much-needed dental cleaning, along with bloodwork, before putting him under anesthesia. He was also treated for severe ear infections and fleas.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Taking in Labradors of all ages can be costly. Without the assistance of donors and groups like The Petfinder Foundation, we would not be able to take in dogs requiring such extensive veterinary care.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Mack is a 13-year-old Labrador retriever who came to us with Lacey when their owner couldn’t care for them. They hadn’t had veterinary care in years and Mack had a huge growth the size of a softball on his neck. Mack is a handsome older gentleman ready to steal your heart! Mack is part of a bonded pair with Lacey. This big boy only wants to snuggle and lay his head on your lap. Mack knows “sit” and “down,” his age just keeps his response a bit on the slow side. True to being a Lab, Mack loves tennis balls and enjoys playing short games of catch. Mack is a good eater, will go into crates, and is great with cats. He would likely be good with children, but his size and enthusiasm for being close to people would be best for older children not intimated by larger dogs. Mack is housebroken and can hold it for several hours if needed. Really, all these fur kids need are lots snuggles. The few times he has been on a leash, he has been a perfect gentleman and does not pull. Both are adoptable.
Meet Mack: http://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/37233347
Meet Lacey: http://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/37233342

Yorkshire Terrier National Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Remi’s medical bills

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

These fund were directly used to help pay for Remi’s medical bills. This grant helped free up $1,000 in funding that was able to be used to help pay for medicals such as spay and neuter and vaccinations for other rescues in need.

How many pets did this grant help?

1-4

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Remi’s doctor said that Remi may need to have bone removed from his sinus area because the antibiotics are not reaching the spot where the infection is hiding, so we give him antibiotics and he responds well to that and then when the antibiotics stop the infection just starts leeching out again. Remi is the sweetest little Yorkie and we continue to care for his needs. He will make a wonderful pet. He is being fostered in Tennessee with a loving family that is able to care for his current special needs. We are currently hoping this next round of antibiotics does the trick. Remi is a happy boy and we don’t want to put him through any more pain. Meet Remi: http://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/35448455

West Feliciana Animal Humane Society: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Hip surgery for Delilah and heartworm treatment and nostril enlargement for Donner.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Delilah has been with us for almost two years. She has been in pain and walks with a limp. This surgery will help her finally get her forever home. Donner has had potential adopters ask about him. He has multiple medical issues and no one is willing to adopt him until the issues are corrected. With the help of the Petfinder Foundation, we have helped these two dogs get healthy. They will be listed as ready for adoption.

How many pets did this grant help?

Two

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Delilah (first photo) came to us with her sister almost two years ago. Her sister was adopted, but Delilah was in pain and walked with a limp. The vet told us that she needed surgery on her hip. With the Emergency Medical Grant, we scheduled her surgery. She is now recuperating and getting physical therapy (second photo). Next month she will be featured on social media as a healthy, happy dog ready for a forever home. Meet Delilah: http://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/31792464

Donner, a shar pei (third photo), came to us with multiple health issues. He was heartworm-positive and his nostrils were too small, causing problems breathing and possible lung problems. There was lots of interest in Donner until his health issues were explained. With the Emergency Medical Grant, Donner has had his nostrils enlarged and started his heartworm treatments. Donner is now in a foster home while he recuperates from his medical treatments.

Scratch My Belly: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Vet bills

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

When we rescued Miles (with his pal Millie), he was very sick. Upon his arrival from the shelter at San Diego Bay Animal Hospital, we were informed that his lungs were completely filled with fluids. What was initially treated as common pneumonia during the first few days of hospitalization was escalated to a severe type of bacterial infection. The actual cost of treatment and hospitalization time were well over three times what was expected. With this grant we were able to cover about 25% of the costs we had with Miles’s care so far.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Miles and his buddy Millie were “residents” at Baldwin Park. Our rescue had made a commitment to save Millie before we knew Miles had come into the shelter with her. Upon their exit from the shelter, we knew Miles was sick, and both pups were taken immediately from the shelter to San Diego Bay Animal Hospital in San Diego to be treated. Upon examination, it was determined that Miles was very sick and, after X-rays, it was confirmed that his lungs were completely filled with fluids and he needed to be hospitalized immediately. The first few days of treatment, Miles showed no improvement with the standard medication used for pneumonia, and after being reevaluated, he was put on a very strong medication which could possibility affect his liver. Miles spent several days on IV and nebulizer treatment, and received daily injections and other drugs to help clear his lungs. After exiting the vet, he relapsed and had to go back, as the medication was affecting his intestines too. Without the help of the Petfinder Foundation, we would not have been able to give Miles the treatment he needed and deserved, and we are now patiently waiting for his loving home to come along. Thank you! Meet Miles: http://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/37084927

SPCA Eastern Shore, Inc.: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

A dental for a blind senior poodle.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The 7-year-old blind poodle, Missy, had bad breath, gums and teeth. This grant would pay the estimated cost of a much-needed dental to remove the teeth, and hopefully prevent any future problems stemming from them.

How many pets did this grant help?

One

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Missy was uninterested in people when she came to us. After weeks of much socializing, she began to stay still and let herself be petted. Slowly, she seemed to be really beginning to enjoy the interaction with people. After a few months here, she was adopted, shortly after this grant was applied for. Within days of being in her new home, Missy took very ill and spent 2.5 days in the hospital, fighting for her life. The doctor said it was a systemic infection and could have been caused by the infection in her mouth. After a couple of months of routine bloodwork to ensure Missy could go through a dental, it was performed on Jan. 5, 2017. Missy came through with no problems — she’d already lost 25 teeth prior to this dental, and the doctor removed the remaining 17 to leave her toothless. She wasn’t interested in food the evening following the dental, but the following morning, she ate with gusto. Next up for Missy: a visit to an eye doctor to remove cataracts in both eyes and replace one lens, with the hope of restoring her sight.

Neenah Animal Shelter: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

We received $900 that was used to cover our dog Taryn’s surgeries. Taryn came in as a stray and, after her mandatory stray hold was up, we discovered she had several tumors throughout her body.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

By being able to save money on Taryn’s surgeries, we were able to put the money we would have spent on her towards our other animals. Because of this, we were able to continue providing space, supplies, and love to the animals in our care.

How many pets did this grant help?

Primarily Taryn, so one. However, as mentioned previously, because we were able to save money with Taryn, we were able to go above and beyond for our additional pets.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

After receiving the surgeries, Taryn was adopted to a loving family. They have renamed her Sophie and say that she is well-loved, loves going to the dog park, and absolutely adores people. They are incredibly happy to have added her to their family.

Ready 2 Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Dental surgery for a senior dog

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped us to provide a much-needed dental surgery for a senior dog whom we were having trouble getting adopted. With the dental work already done, he became a much more adoptable dog.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

When Dallas police raided a drug house, they came upon a German shepherd dog whom they were uncertain about. Once they spoke to him, he wagged his tail and approached them. He was skin and bones, and obviously needed some help. They took him to Dallas Animal Services to get that help. After a couple of days, George (as the police had named him) became depressed and refused to eat. Having already become attached to him, the officers brought him into their office at the shelter, and began trying to get him to eat. Slowly but surely, he began to eat and was less depressed. Each day, they worked with him and he began to gain a little weight. The new concern was that he had been at the shelter too long and needed a rescue or adopter to step up for him before he ended up on the euthanasia list.

As it turned out, Ready 2 Rescue was at the shelter and the rescue coordinator asked if she could show us a dog. We agreed, and once we met George, we knew we needed to take him into our program. We had George neutered and, once he’d recovered, tried him out with some other dogs. Unfortunately, he was less than friendly with other dogs, which makes it difficult to find a family for him that didn’t have another dog already. We posted and networked him, but had no luck in finding a family for him.

He was also in need of some serious dental work, and we thought perhaps that might make him more adoptable, having had it already done. Thanks to the Petfinder Foundation, we were able to get his dental work completed! During the dental work, the vet discovered a suspicious growth on George’s foot, removed it and sent it off for a biopsy. Thank goodness it was not cancerous, even though it had appeared it might be.

George healed from all his surgeries and finally found the perfect home with adults, kids, and a grandpa who wanted to walk him every day. The family only wanted one dog, so George fit the bill! He now lives indoors with all the walks and love he needs!

SPCA Eastern Shore, Inc.: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The money was used for a dental on a senior dog.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The dog needing the dental was a senior and had very bad teeth, gums and breath.

How many pets did this grant help?

One

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Missy, our senior blind poodle, had very bad breath and terrible teeth. We wrote the Petfinder Foundation for an emergency medical grant for the estimated cost of a dental, $500, which was granted very quickly. Missy was adopted just before receiving word that we had been awarded this grant; we contacted Missy’s parents and let them know about the grant award. Before the dental could be scheduled, Missy had to go in the hospital for emergency care, where it was found that she had severe infection throughout her body, probably stemming from her mouth. As soon as she was well enough for a dental, it would be scheduled.

The dental was performed on Jan. 5, 2017; X-rays showed 25 teeth already missing, leaving 17 to need removal. No surgery was needed as the teeth came out on their own with just a small amount of wiggling. Missy’s parents paid the bill in full, totaling $388.71. Our shelter will reimburse them this expense from the $500 grant from the Petfinder Foundation. Missy’s next vet appointment will be with a specialist eye doctor, with plans to remove the cataracts from both eyes, and to replace one lens; it is expected to give her back most, if not all, of her sight.

P.A.W.S. Pound Animals are Worth Saving, Inc.: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

P.A.W.S. used a $450 Emergency Medical Grant from the Petfinder Foundation to pay for critical dental surgery, treatment, and medication for a cat named Chance. Chance needed several rounds of antibiotics and several complex dental extractions, as well as a thorough cleaning, to get him healthy for adoption.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant allows P.A.W.S. to continue taking in homeless cats and kittens from the surrounding community. P.A.W.S. adopts over 900 felines to loving homes each year. However, special medical needs for some of those cats can really tax the shelter budget, and this grant was important for getting Chance the surgery he badly needed.

How many pets did this grant help?

One very special cat

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

P.A.W.S. is thrilled to report that Chance was adopted on Nov. 26, 2016, to the perfect home. Chance is a large male orange tabby with a huge personality, gigantic polydactyl paws, and a very rough play drive! He is also FIV-positive. We knew it would take a while to find an adopter who would love him despite his rambunctious nature! Furthermore, Chance came to us with a severe gum infection and several dental issues. Thanks to an Emergency Medical Grant from the Petfinder Foundation, P.A.W.S. was able to get Chance healthy before finding him that home.

Kennebec Valley Humane Society: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The money was used to pay medical expenses for Parker, a cat who was hit by a car and brought to our shelter.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped support our mission to care for and place all animals into loving forever homes regardless of their circumstances. Without funds from generous donors like the Petfinder Foundation, we would not be able to provide high-level care to so many vulnerable animals in the community.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Parker is a cat who was hit by a car and found in urgent need of medical care. He had broken and fractured bones and was unable to move or eat on his own. He came to Kennebec Valley Humane Society, where he was given medical treatment and care. After Parker recovered, he was scooped up right away by his new owner and we could not be more happy for him!

Happy Endings No Kill Cat Shelter: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The generous $1,000 grant from the Petfinder Foundation was used to cover the medical expenses of a cat in our shelter who required amputation of his front right leg after being shot with a gun.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

As we are a totally volunteer- and donation-based nonprofit, the Petfinder Foundation grant helped us to pay for a very expensive vet bill.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Major was a stray cat whom someone in his neighborhood was feeding. One day this person noticed that Major was hobbling badly, and upon a closer look, saw that his front right leg was severely mangled. This good Samaritan got Major to a vet at once. Major was transferred to Advanced Animal Hospital, one of our vet partners. Advanced contacted Happy Endings to seek placement and request coverage of the medical bill for Major. We couldn’t say no.

It ends up that someone in Major’s neighborhood had shot him, and his right leg needed to be amputated. He was also neutered at that time. Major stayed at Advanced a couple of days and then came to Happy Endings. His first two weeks were a rough transition for Major since he had been a stray. Our volunteers worked with him to get him used to a person’s touch and made sure he tried to get up and venture out on three legs.

After a couple of weeks, Major turned into a loving purr monster who loves people. He moved from being sequestered in our medical room to the front adoption area of our shelter. In less than a week, a nice, young single man named Joe fell in love with Major and adopted him and worships the ground Major walks on. This story truly has a happy ending!

Capital Area Rescue Effort (CARE): Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Lifesaving medical care and surgery

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We were able to prevent the euthanasia of Cotton, an 8-week-old puppy, and provide her with lifesaving surgery.

How many pets did this grant help?

One

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

The Petfinder Foundation Emergency Medical Grant assisted with the surgical and medical needs of Cotton, a Jack Russell terrier puppy with atresia ani, a congenital defect that results in an inability to pass feces. This condition is often fatal and takes animals early in life. We were fortunate to be able to save her from [an open-admission] shelter two states away, transport her to Virginia Veterinary Surgical Associates in Richmond, VA, and provide her with lifesaving surgery. It’s been nearly four months since her surgery and she is doing extremely well! She is now available for adoption: http://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/36627547

We are very grateful to the Petfinder Foundation for this grant that saved Cotton and for the ongoing support provided to the animal-rescue community.

Purr Partners Feline Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The money was used for eye enucleation surgery for Kissa.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Without this grant for surgery for Kissa, she would not have been able to have her eye removed, which was necessary for her continued health. Without the surgery she would not have been able to be adopted into a loving home.

How many pets did this grant help?

One

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Kissa was found in the middle of a major highway in the pouring rain. The people who picked her up called one of our Purr Partners volunteers and asked if we could take her. This volunteer took Kissa to our vet, and it was obvious from her injuries that she had been thrown from a moving car. One of her eyes was severely damaged and there was road rash on her face, plus one side of her face was deformed. She was also very sick with an upper-respiratory infection. The vet treated her with antibiotics and recommended removal of her eye. We had to wait until she was four months old so she could safely be sedated long enough to remove the eye. The surgery went well, and after a period of recovery, she has been adopted into a wonderful forever home.

Animal Aid of Branch County: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

This money was used to help pay the medical expenses for Keely, an abandoned pup who came to us last summer suffering from general neglect and an old untreated injury to her foot that was so infected, amputation of that leg was required. She made a great recovery and has been adopted by the teacher of a special-education classroom.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The truly wonderful thing about this grant is the ripple effect that it has on our ability to help other pets. Because of the support of the Petfinder Foundation for this case, we were able to use our limited funds to help other pets that came into our care. It is our hope that these ripples will reflect back to the Foundation, and that as people see how Keely was assisted and become more aware of the Petfinder Foundation, they will donate so that you may help others like her.

How many pets did this grant help?

one

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

This particular grant assisted Keely, a pup who was pushed out a car window, along with three siblings and an unrelated adult dog, along a country road. All suffered from general neglect, poor nutrition, fleas, skin irritations, etc., but Keely had a severely infected foot with an old, rotting injury that necessitated amputation of the leg to prevent the spread of infection and save her life. She made a great recovery and has been adopted by a special-education teacher who is hoping that in the future Keely can be used as a role model for anyone dealing with disabilities. In Keely’s mind, she has no disability, so she is an encouraging example for anyone who meets her.

Kitty City Cat Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The $1,000 grant was used (and is still being used for) the veterinary bills for Shire, a cat at our shelter who desperately needed an empty eye socket closed and the tear duct repaired. He also needed to become healthy enough for that surgery — he came to us as a sickly kitten, and he has incurred a year’s worth of costly vet bills. He had surgery in late October, and he will need another surgery, as part of his surgical site has opened a tiny bit.

Shire was seen by Dr. Grice at Northside Wesleyan Animal Hospital in Macon, GA. So far, his bills have totaled almost $800, and he has another surgery to be scheduled in the next two weeks.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant has helped us immensely. We are a small cat shelter in central Georgia, and we survive solely on donations. Shire came to us weak and at death’s doorstep. It is our mission to help all animals in our care become completely healthy and adoptable, but sometimes that comes at a great cost. Before receiving the Petfinder Foundation grant, we had not been able to schedule Shire’s surgery due to the cost of care. After his upcoming second surgery, he will be adoptable! Receiving funding for his care has also allowed us to be able to better care for other cats in our shelter who have additional veterinary needs.

How many pets did this grant help?

One

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Shire came to us as a very sickly, emaciated kitten in January 2016. He came in with his much-healthier sister, and honestly we did not think he would survive. He had an empty eye socket that constantly remained infected, and it also caused him to have sinus infections since the tear duct wasn’t draining properly. Shire went into foster care to see if he could become stronger outside the shelter, and he thrived! He returned to the shelter, but he was still plagued with sinus infections which required antibiotics and nasal medication daily. We applied for the Petfinder Foundation Emergency Medical Grant in the hopes that we could provide our sweet Shire with surgery to close the eye and repair the duct, and we received funding! Shire had his first surgery in late October and it was very effective. A small part of the surgery site has re-opened, so he will need surgery again in the coming weeks to close the eye. After this surgery, we are hoping Shire can find his perfect forever home — he is such a loving, rambunctious teddy bear of a cat and we would love to see him happy with his very own family. Meet Shire: http://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/34227957

Gritty Pittie Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Dental surgery for one of our rescue dogs.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Without it, other areas of our operation would have been negatively impacted by the diversion of funds. In its absence, we would still have done what was needed to eventually raise the money, but I am quite sure Delilah is relieved it happened sooner than later. I cannot express enough my gratitude for your foundation’s aid and assistance.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Delilah, one of our current rescue dogs, needed dental work, and the grant money covered the expense. With this grant we were able to provide Delilah the relief she needed. Delilah is ready for her forever people. She is one of the most gentle souls we’ve ever met. You know, one of those special ones. She is shy at first, but we don’t mind. It’s like she’s telling us part of her story. She loves her kitty friends and does well with dogs. She snorts to let you know how much she appreciates your love.

Watertown Humane Society: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

$488.20 was used to help a young kitten, Sam, who had been hit by a car. $63.30 went towards Sam’s adoption fee and $48.50 towards Meatloaf’s adoption fee.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The money was used to help a young kitten, Sam, who had been hit by a car and sustained damage to the left brachial plexus, the bundle of nerves for the left forelimb. Sam had no reflexes in the left forelimb and the muscles of the left leg had all atrophied. Sam would never be able to use the left forelimb and therefore the leg was amputated. A portion of the remainder of the money was used towards Sam’s adoption fee and the rest will be used towards the adoption fee for Meatloaf, who tested positive for FIV.

How many pets did this grant help?

Two

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

The Watertown Humane Society sincerely thanks the Petfinder Foundation for the Emergency Medical Grant that we received in July. This money was used to help a young kitten named Sam who had been hit by a car and sustained serious damage to his left forelimb. Sam had no reflexes in his left forelimb and would never be able to use that leg. With the help of the Petfinder Foundation, we were able to amputate Sam’s left forelimb so he can now have a better quality of life. Sam has been in a foster home and as soon as he recovers from his surgery, the foster family will be adopting him. The Petfinder Foundation’s Emergency Medical Grant program is used to assist Petfinder members caring for a pet who needs special lifesaving veterinary care in order to become adoptable and we can’t thank you enough for your support.

San Antonio R.O.C.K.S.: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The Emergency Medical Grant was used for medical expenses related to an injured dog we pulled from the local shelter.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

See story below …

How many pets did this grant help?

One: Toby

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Toby was picked up as a stray by San Antonio’s Animal Care Services; it is believed he was suffering from injuries sustained from being hit by a car. Oftentimes, many of the dogs at our local shelter who require immediate medical care are overlooked by adopters and other rescues because of medical needs.

“We receive so many requests to save dogs with medical issues, but after being made aware of Toby’s extensive injuries, we realized that if we didn’t save him from the shelter, it was likely no one else would and he would be euthanized, and we couldn’t let that happen,” says Telma Garcia, San Antonio R.O.C.K.S. director and Toby’s foster.

The shelter’s clinic noted that Toby was presenting swelling in the left and right legs, with weight-bearing lameness in both hind legs. X-rays indicated his injuries to be quite extensive – he had bilateral fractured femurs to both hind legs (five total breaks) and a broken pelvis. San Antonio R.O.C.K.S. stepped in to help save him from the shelter and to treat his injuries.

After picking him up from the shelter, it was apparent he was in severe pain and he was immediately driven to our veterinarian for a full exam and treatment. His surgery was scheduled for the following day. Our veterinarians performed an extensive surgery to repair the five fractures with pins and wires, including two femoral head osteotomy (FHO) procedures. He spent a few extra nights at the vet clinic for observation and to receive therapy; then he was released into a medical foster home where he received the rest and care needed to complete his recovery process. He has since been adopted!

“At any given time, we have three to four medical cases, of which at least one is major,” says Elissa Heatherly, a San Antonio R.O.C.K.S. director. “We are beyond grateful for grants from organizations like the Petfinder Foundation — which allow us to care for these animals who would have likely been overlooked in the shelter — rehabilitate them, and place them in forever homes.”

Pits R Us All-Breed Rescue & Adoptions: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The funds received were applied directly to an emergency vet bill and hospitalization for a puppy named Baby Pop Tart, who was lethargic, not eating and dehydrated. The vets diagnosed his tiny, 1.5-lb. body with a liver shunt that was inoperable.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The funds helped financially cover the cost of the three-day hospital stay and diagnosis while the vet staff tried to stabilize him in hopes of being able to perform surgery to correct the shunt. Unfortunately, their lifesaving efforts were unsuccessful, and he crossed the Rainbow Bridge peacefully.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Baby Pop Tart’s life was cut short by an inoperable liver shunt. He was only 1.5 lbs and not stable enough to undergo surgery. He was loved for his short time here with us, and will always have a part of our hearts.

Mit Liebe German Shepherd Dog Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

This money was used to help provide emergency vet care for two of our rescues who were both saved hours from being euthanized in Chicago.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The $1,000 grant helped Mit Liebe to pay off vet bills that were incurred by Lilly and Coco. The dogs were both treated for pneumonia, ear infections and kennel cough.

How many pets did this grant help?

Two dogs

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Coco was rescued from a Chicago shelter, literally hours from being put to sleep because she wasn’t eating and seemed to have given up on life in the 30+ days she had been sitting in the shelter. Illness at the shelter can be deadly, meaning they are overcrowded and the sick and long-term animals are the first to be added to the euthanasia list. Mit Liebe was able to secure a foster home and raced to get her out of the shelter and directly to the vet, fearing she was exposed to the canine flu, which could be deadly to a dog of her age — which, by the way, was noted as 7 when her owner surrendered her and turned out to really be 13.

Anyway, after several tests, fluids and x-rays, Coco was cleared to go home that night, but not before we found out she had pneumonia, a severe ear infection, kennel cough, and two large masses thought to be cancer growing on her lungs. The medication prescribed helped to cure her pneumonia, kennel cough, and ear infections, but due to her age, Mit Liebe opted not to operate on Coco’s lung mass and instead chose to just let her live out the rest of her life in hospice care.

The first photo shows Coco the day she was rescued (top) and then six weeks later. She’s been putting on weight and getting more lively. She even attended a barbecue with her foster mom and was quite the hit. Thank you for the funding that helped us rescue such a great gal and give her a chance at a happy life.

Lilly, the other dog we rescued from the same shelter, also hours from being put to sleep because of the amount of time she had spent there, is also happy, healthy and has a potential adoption lined up. She came to the shelter with an infected tail that they ended up amputating. After sitting there for 30 days and becoming ill from kennel cough and pneumonia, she was also added to the euthanasia list.

Mit Liebe was able to rescue her, place her in foster care and provide her the emergency vet care she needed. She has spent over four months in foster care getting better and enjoying her freedom. Lilly is a sweet girl and will do well in her (potential) new home. The second photo shows Lilly with her foster sister, Skype.

Mit Liebe German Shepherd Dog Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The money was used to pay for an emergency vet visit for one of our rescues in foster care.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant helped to pay the emergency vet bill we incurred.

How many pets did this grant help?

One

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Wally, a 9-month-old GSD mix, was in foster care for about three weeks when one Friday evening he started hacking and gagging. His foster mom wasted no time cooking him up broth and honey to help soothe his throat, but after an entire night of coughing and gagging every time he laid down, she decided it was time to make an emergency vet visit the next morning. Wally was taken to the only open vet in the area, about an hour’s drive away. The vet at the clinic diagnosed him with bronchitis and was concerned about it turning to pneumonia, so he was prescribed multiple antibiotics and cough suppressants to help calm Wally’s throat and hacking cough.

After a few days on medication, Wally was feeling back to his old playful self again. Once cleared by the vet, he was ready to be adopted. His new mom had been waiting patiently to bring him to her home and was overjoyed to hear he was feeling better and ready to become a part of his forever home with her.

Turns out, the new adopter was Wally’s foster mom’s mom. His former foster mom gets to see him all the time and reports he’s doing great in his new home! She jokes he’s the brother she never wanted 🙂 Thanks again to the Petfinder Foundation for helping us make this adoption possible. Attached is a photo of Wally with his new mom, Cheri.

Humane Society of York County: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Neck-laceration repair and post-operative care of Love.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The $1,000 granted to us helped us directly to pay Love’s veterinary invoice. However, more than that, it saved us from the need to redirect funds from dog intake to this emergency care — and by that I mean that five dogs will not end up as strays or at an [open-admission] shelter. And, of course, it ended the suffering that Love has been going through for months at least.

How many pets did this grant help?

One

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Love is a sweet 3-year-old female Labrador mix who was brought to us with a severe laceration around her neck, possibly due to an embedded collar. Her former owner is homeless and wasn’t able to give her the care she needed. She was brought to us by a nice gentleman who was really concerned about her welfare. She had surgery and now is waiting to be adopted. She is precious, behaves really well and LOVES everyone. Meet Love: http://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/36439901

Please look at the movie we did about her: https://youtu.be/WIUwBHQFCyI

Second Chance Sheridan Cat Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

This was a medical emergency grant for a cat named Suzie Q. She was painted purple and shot in the spine. The bullet caused hind-end paralysis and incontinence. We used money from this grant to fund acupuncture treatments and medical check-ups for Suzie Q.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Suzie Q continues to improve. Her condition is still tenuous, but the veterinarian in charge of her care is optimistic. Suzie Q is able to stand on her hind legs for a few second at a time, and we have seen her attempt to take a few steps with her back legs each day. This is a huge improvement over her initial condition when she arrived.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Suzie Q was painted purple and shot in the spine. The bullet caused hind-end paralysis and incontinence. Here is the original post by the woman who rescued her: “To whoever tortured, shot, dumped and hoped to end the life of this precious, beautiful creature: You did not succeed. As she dragged her paralyzed body from underneath a car in a parking lot, her eyes only asked for help. No crying, no biting, and complete, immediate trust to human hands. She welcomed the blanket in the dark, cold, windy night and accepted human comfort despite the hell she had been through that day. Obviously socialized and a former pet to someone, with traces of a recently removed collar, she quickly fell asleep on the ride to the vet. Was it from exhaustion, pain, relief, acceptance of her end? We can only guess and speak on her behalf.

“To whoever tried to break this kitty’s spirit: You did not succeed. She has fought through this and is now resting comfortably in a warm bed after her surgery today. The pellet was successfully removed from the area around her spine, but the prognosis on her ongoing paralysis is not yet known. But rest assured, this amazing little kitty will now receive the love, attention and compassion she so greatly deserves. And you, whoever you are, will fade away from her memory into the oblivion you deserve. We speak for the animals — and you, who tried to harm this kitty, will receive your karma in due time. You did not succeed.”

Valley Animal Haven: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The funds from the grant were used to pay for emergency medical procedures for our shelter dog Calvin. He had paraphimosis, which caused a swelling of his penis. He was unable to retract his penis back into the sheath and required emergency surgery to correct the problem. The total bill for Calvin’s surgery was $528.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The funding for our shelter comes from donations and grants. We are a relatively new shelter and have very limited funds available. The costs for Calvin’s surgery definitely put a very tight pinch in our very small budget. This grant gave us back some breathing room.

How many pets did this grant help?

The entire amount of the grant was used to help Calvin.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Calvin was adopted from our shelter as a puppy. After being with his new family for approximately nine months, he was returned to our shelter, as the family could no longer provide proper care for him. It took Calvin longer than usual to readjust to shelter life. The barking of the other dogs caused him an excessive amount of stress, which in turn caused his issue with the paraphimosis. Calvin’s surgery was a success and he was adopted into a new loving forever family approximately 30 days after his procedure. Calvin is doing well with his new family and they provide us with updates on him regularly.

A Second Chance Dog Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Medical care for Chloe, which included her spay

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

See below

How many pets did this grant help?

one: Chloe

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

In June we received a call from someone who found a dog that she thought had been set on fire. She called Second Chance Dog Rescue for help. We took the dog to our vet to be assessed. She was diagnosed with demodectic mange. So her journey began. We named her Chloe. She was given her shots and flea and tick meds and wormed. She started her first Mitaban dip and bath and her first skin scrape. This regimen continued every two weeks until her spay on Sept. 30, 2016.

On Aug. 27, the precious thing had her first negative skin scrape! That means we will do one more dip, then she’ll be spayed, then she’ll be officially adoptable! We are so very happy and amazed by how quickly this pup has healed. Dr. J said originally that she would be doing scrapes until January. Thank you so much to our loving foster, veterinarian, and the Petfinder Foundation for granting us the money to care for her skin issues! We are so blessed to have the team we do. Of course Chloe wouldn’t stop bugging her sister Maggie long enough to get a face picture (fourth photo).

Purrs & Whiskers, Inc.: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Infection/wound treatment

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Simon had his wound flushed, debrided, and drained. Without this immediate care, Simon would not have been able to heal from whatever caused his wound and subsequent infection — and he wouldn’t have been able to be placed with a loving forever family! 🙂

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We were contacted by a resident in the community who had found a stray adult male cat, whom they named Simon. Simon had multiple puncture wounds on both sides of the base of his tail. It was determined that immediate flushing, debriding and draining was needed. He underwent anesthesia and they placed an IV catheter to give him fluids, antibiotics, electrolytes and injectable pain management. Afterwards, he was sent home with continued oral pain meds and, of course, the ever-dreaded E-collar. In short order, his wounds had healed and he showed no more signs of pain. He was then able to find his fur-ever home! 🙂

Make A Friend In Animals (MAFIA): Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

To pay for after-hours emergency vet clinic care for venomous snake bite to a canine.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It allowed us to carry on with regular expenses for all the pets in our care without hardship.

How many pets did this grant help?

28 in addition to the patient

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Jackie suffered from a copperhead snake bite and was rushed, after hours, to the emergency veterinary hospital in July 2016. At the clinic it was confirmed through blood tests that she had been bitten. The options for treatment where a very expensive anti-venom or a more conservative blood transfusion. It was suggested to try the blood transfusion first, which proved successful. The following morning we transported Jackie to our regular veterinarian, who has expertise in snake bites, for a physical exam. After the exam, Jackie was released with 10 days of antibiotics. Jackie is fully recovered from the incident and never speaks of it! Meet Jackie: https://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/13965327

Karma Cat + Zen Dog Rescue Society: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

This generous grant was used for the medical care of a cat we took in from a hoarding situation. The grant paid the majority of veterinary bills for Billie Holiday, including her spay, dental cleaning, x-rays and blood work.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant allowed us to quickly take care of Billie Holiday’s medical needs without impacting our financial ability to help other cats at the same time.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

In May 2016, 86 animals were found living in deplorable conditions in a condo in West New York, NJ. All the animals were housed in one room, most of them in cages. Well, surely it must have been a large room? No. The room was approximately 81 square feet. That is roughly equivalent to three queen-sized mattresses. The pictures of the room are as horrible as you can imagine. They were emaciated and sick, living in their own waste, in a room with such toxic odors that first responders had to wear haz-mat suits.

We did our small part by taking four of the cats with help from The Lucky Cat Rescue. We don’t have a shelter with an isolation room, so these four cats went directly to a gracious foster home that opened up their spare bathroom to the cats. The cats were re-examined by a veterinarian, FeLV/FIV tested, vaccinated and flea-treated. After that, everyone was scheduled for spay surgeries as well as any other medical treatments (x-rays, blood work and dental exams/cleanings).

Of the four cats, two (Sarah Vaughn and Etta James) have already been adopted. Ella Fitzgerald is still gaining weight and learning to trust humans. Billie Holiday has recovered from her procedures and is currently waiting for a forever home. Her Petfinder profile is here: http://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/35464591

Furkids Dog Shelter: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

This emergency medical grant was used to pay for treatment of parvo for a dog named Beluga.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

See below.

How many pets did this grant help?

Numerous. By saving the funds we would have used for him, there is no telling how many other lives were impacted.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Beluga was found on the side of the road by a good Samaritan who googled “animal shelters” and showed up at the front door of our cat shelter on a weekend. The dog was sick — very sick. We had no plans to rescue a sick pit bull that day, but how could we turn him away? No one was open and able to help, but we were. We rushed him to one of our vets, where we quickly learned he had parvo. Luckily we caught it in time and, with treatment, he was able to survive and be the crazy fun dog he is today. Your support and donation made this happen! Beluga is still waiting for adoption. Meet Beluga: http://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/35711307

American Black & Tan Coonhound Rescue, Inc.: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

To pay for a portion of the cost of removal of a dog’s salivary gland after a salivary cystocele developed.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We had already paid for two surgeries to repair the salivary gland duct (total of $808.30), a more conservative approach than removing the entire gland. When it became clear that he would need a third surgery for approximately $1,200, your grant defrayed a portion of the cost. This grant, combined with donations, funded the third surgery.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Otis is a young Plott hound boy who was pulled from a North Carolina [open-admission] shelter. Shortly after he arrived in his foster home, a large swelling on his jawline was noted. It was determined that one of his salivary glands had ruptured, causing the acidic saliva to pool in an internal pocket. Surgery would be required or he would have to be euthanized. After consulting with specialists at Tufts, the vet attempted to create a new duct to properly drain the saliva. This approach ultimately failed and a third surgery was required to remove the entire gland. This surgery was successful and he was adopted. Otis is now living happily in Massachusetts.

Caruthersville Humane Society, Inc.: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

This grant was a $250 grant to help with medical expenses for an abused pit bull we named Arabella. She was dragged behind a vehicle and her back paws were ground down to the bone. She was anemic and had a serious infection from her untreated wounds. Her abuser was convicted of animal abuse.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped pay for treatment for Arabella that saved her life.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Arabella was one of two pit bulls seized from a man in Hayti, Missouri, by the Hayti Police Department when they found them in poor condition. Arabella was the worse of the two and had been dragged behind a vehicle. Her wounds were not treated, resulting in a severe infection. She was malnourished, anemic, covered in fleas, and had open wounds on both back paws and her legs, some down to the bone. She could barely stand on her legs. She was vetted and rehabbed and will go to her forever home after she is spayed on Sept. 8. Before and after pictures are attached.

Bullies and Buddies Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Medical bills

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We used the funds to pay the medical bills for Bob Marley, who was sick, severely matted, flea-infested and had broken toes. He had many vet visits to treat his conditions and is he doing great now!

How many pets did this grant help?

One male poodle mix named Bob Marley

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Bob Marley, a sweet male poodle mix, was found alone and neglected under a park bench with severely matted fur. He was sick, had broken toes and was being eaten alive by fleas. With help from the Petfinder Foundation, Mission Underdog Group and our vets, he received the medical attention he needed, including a much-needed bath and grooming, a cast to help his broken bones heal, flea medication and vaccinations. This cutie is on the path to recovery. He has a gentle soul and a loving personality and we can’t wait to find him his forever home. Thank you again so much to the Petfinder Foundation team for your help and support, which allowed us to give Bob Marley the life he deserves. Meet Bob Marley: https://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/36062358

Furry Kids' Refuge: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The grant money was used to pay for femoral head ostectomy [hip] surgery and pin removal on Sidney, a shepherd mix who had been hit by multiple cars and left for dead.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Grants like this are such a welcome relief to our group, as our veterinary costs continue to increase while we care for so many animals with atypical medical issues. Donations and adoption fees can only cover a portion of the costs incurred, so without the generosity of organizations like the Petfinder Foundation, we would not be able to rescue as many wonderful animals as we have. So THANK YOU, Petfinder Foundation, for helping us continue our mission of rescuing abandoned and homeless animals.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Sidney, a shepherd mix, was hit by multiple cars prior to being found by a Good Samaritan. He had been left for dead with multiple fractures in his hind legs. He taken to a vet who performed surgery, resulting in intramedullary pins in his left tibia and his right femur. After this surgery, Furry Kids’ Refuge was asked to take him in. We had him evaluated by our vet. It was determined that the right femur had fractured at the distal growth plate, but the pin completely missed the fracture and extended far too distal below the femur, causing local loss of bone where it was digging into the caudal tibia. Additional x-rays also showed that Sidney’s left hip has a fractured femoral neck and needs FHO surgery to remove the fractured piece in the socket and more of the femoral neck. This surgery prevents the pain of bone rubbing on bone and allows a fibrous joint to form over time. After several months, dogs perform almost completely normally.

Sidney’s right femoral head was found to be completely dislocated and the entire bone rotated 90 degrees counterclockwise. The bone pin was removed from the right femur as it wasn’t doing any good. Sidney’s right leg is fixed in position there is nothing to be done at this time on the right side. He is able to use the right leg as a “peg” to walk on and will need it while recovering from FHO surgery. After he heals from the FHO surgery and pin removal on left hind leg, it will be decided if he needs his right leg amputated or if he can live with its limited use.

Newnan Coweta Humane Society: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

See below.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We would have had to euthanize Charlie because of lack of funds to care for him and his extensive medical needs.

How many pets did this grant help?

one

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Charlie’s legs evidently were broken at some point in his life. They were never repaired. They healed incorrectly, which made walking very difficult and painful. Charlie’s back leg was re-broken and pins were placed in it to secure it and help with proper healing. Unfortunately, one of the pins shifted, so a second surgery has occurred. Without this grant, we would have had to euthanize Charlie because of lack of funds to care for him and his extensive medical needs.

From his foster mom Shari: “Charlie had two surgeries. The first one didn’t work as well as we wanted. Charlie ended up moving a pin and breaking part of the bone, so a second surgery was needed. I have attached that picture. He is doing so great now. He barely limps, and loves to run and play with the other dogs. There is no real follow-up needed. I do want to bring him in one more time to make sure that his band is still okay. Charlie is VERY active and even though he is healed, it will ease my mind.”

Greyhound Adoption League of Texas: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The Emergency Medical Grant of $750 was used as follows:

$129.22 Apoquel for allergies
$32.98 Terbinatine to treat fungal infection
$66.00 ProtaTek Lab (intake)
$330.30 Intake tests (heartworm, fecal, urine, fungal culture, CBC and chemistry serum panel)
$40.75 medical exam
$29.10 Heartgard preventative for three months
$95.47 fungal culture (retest at three months)
$66.00 ProtaTek lab (retest at three months)

$789.82 Total expenses for Victoria

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Victoria was turned over to Animal Control in Tulia, Texas, in early May by a coyote hunter. She had a large open wound on the right side of her thorax, most likely caused by a barbed-wire fence. She came to us very thin with other skin issues, as well as an infected left eye. Victoria had a positive high titer to Ehrlichia Canis, as well as a high parasitic infestation of hookworms and a fungal infection on her skin. Victoria was quickly placed in a foster home so she could receive daily cleansing of her wound and application of medicine to prevent infection. As of early July, Victoria completed her treatment for Ehrlichia Canis and had a negative PCR test as well as a negative fecal. Her wound has healed and her skin condition has cleared; she will be available for adoption soon. (http://galtx.org/hounds/victoria2.shtml)

How many pets did this grant help?

One: Victoria

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Victoria came to the Greyhound Adoption League of Texas (GALT) as a surrender from a coyote hunter to Animal Control in Tulia, Texas. Victoria had a large open wound on her chest that required immediate treatment. Upon intake it was determined that she had other skin conditions, an eye infection and hookworms and she tested positive for Ehrlichia. The light in her eyes was gone. GALT’s creed is “no grey turned away,” and it was obvious that Victoria needed us. We immediately found a loving foster home so she could begin the intense treatment she needed for the open wound. Being in a safe environment with other greyhounds bolstered her spirit and she responded well to her new surroundings. Victoria put on weight, her wounds healed, the parasites were cured and the tick-borne disease was treated successfully. Over the course of three months, she found her playful side, enjoying the life she likely never thought was possible. Attached are two pictures from when Victoria was a broken soul when she first arrived, as well as two beautiful “after” pictures showing her fabulous recovery. Thank you, Petfinder Foundation, for helping to put the sparkle in Victoria’s big brown eyes!

Grey Face Rescue and Retirement: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The Emergency Medical Grant we received from the Petfinder Foundation was put towards treatment for Casey, a senior foster with Grey Face. We used it specifically to pay for treatments through our vet clinic, VCA Feist.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It was an enormous help to cover the costs of Casey’s treatment. Other then Casey’s need for treatment, she was a very healthy dog who could potentially live a very happy and lengthy life. We wanted to dedicate the grant to Casey’s well-being and health so she could find her forever family.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Casey came to Grey Face Rescue from Texas when her previous shelter closed its doors. She came with eight other companions. Casey was intended to come to Minnesota and be a emotional-support dog for a young girl. After a few months in their home, Casey’s “leaking” and urinating became too much. Casey was then placed in a foster home, where she had a scuffle with the resident dog and was asked to be removed immediately.

Casey has a probable chronic history of pyelonephritis [kidney infection] and cystitis. It is believed that when she was in rescue down in Texas, it went undiagnosed. When Casey became part of Grey Face, she was having a lot of urinary problems and we started diagnostics to rule things out. The main diagnostics we did that helped to diagnose Casey were a urinalysis, an abdominal ultrasound and a urine culture. The urinalysis came back positive for a urinary-tract infection; the abdominal ultrasound showed no signs of a mass but showed thickening and inflammation of the urinary tract; and the urine culture came back positive for a organism that is pretty antibiotic-resistant.

There were three choices of treatment for Casey, but in speaking with multiple veterinarians, there was one option that they all recommended: an oral tablet called Chloramphenicol. It is given every eight hours. The person giving the medication needs to wear gloves. The main possible complication with this medication is causing problems with bone marrow. In order to monitor for this, a complete blood count test is recommended a certain number of days after starting the medication.

Casey has been on her treatment for two weeks and is improving daily. She is in her new foster home and LOVING her life. She is even being adopted 🙂

These days she enjoys boat rides, reading with her foster sister and receiving endless amounts of love. It’s a true Cinderella story and it is amazing to give Casey a second chance. Thank you for your support!

Paws Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The funds were used to pay for medical expenses for a rescued dog, Ester, who needed surgery to amputate her injured front leg. The veterinarian believed the damage to her front leg was caused by a steel trap. Ester was found by a family one evening and we arranged for her to be taken to the vet the next day for an exam and surgery. Ester fully recovered from her surgery.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant helped Paws Rescue cover expenses related to the amputation that were not “planned” expenses. The expenses for the surgery were above and beyond the usual vaccination and spay or neuter that most of our rescued cats and dogs require upon intake. The surgery helped restore Ester’s health and allowed to her to continue growing and developing, as she was only 3 months old when she was found. In turn, by our rescuing Ester and having the surgery performed, she was far more likely to be adopted.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

During a severe thunderstorm on the evening of Feb. 28, 2016, Ester was found by a family in Vicksburg, Mississippi. The family heard a whining cry coming from outside, and they found Ester in their driveway. She was soaking wet and severely injured. Part of her front right leg was missing and she was not able to walk on it. The family called Paws Rescue to see if we could help the dog, and they offered to foster her until she could be adopted. We made arrangements for them to take Ester to the veterinary clinic the next day. The veterinarian examined her and determined she was only 12 weeks old and that the injury to her foot was not recent. Based on the nature of the injury, it appeared that her leg had been caught in a steel trap at some point during her short life. The vet recommended amputation of the leg since she was not able to use it. They performed the surgery that same day and everything went well. Several days later, when she was ready to leave the veterinary clinic, Ester went to stay with her new foster family for the rest of her recovery. Ester fully recovered from her surgery, and by late April, she was spayed, fully vaccinated, and ready to be adopted. However, her foster family had fallen in love while taking care of her, and they decided they had to adopt Ester. It was a truly a happy ending for everyone!

Sled Dog Sanctuary: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Our grant money was used for lab testing, medicine, digestive supplements and special dietary food.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant greatly helped our dog Arrow, who was struggling to gain weight. No matter what we did for him, he just kept losing weight. With the emergency funding we were able to get him to our vet for testing and assessment. We were able to afford special food and digestive supplements and watch the pounds come back on him as he regained his health.

How many pets did this grant help?

one

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Arrow came to us from an owner who could no longer care for him due to his increasing size, health issues and rambunctious puppy behavior. When he came to us he was underweight, under-socialized and had an intense fear of men. As we worked to put weight on him, he proved very difficult, and we quickly realized we not only had a socialization case to work with but a health case as well. Months passed and, while Arrow was still maintaining and was active, he still held on to an unexplained weight loss. After his second visit to our vet we knew this boy was going to need a lot more testing to determine what was going on. We applied for the Emergency Medical Grant through the Petfinder Foundation and started Arrow’s tests immediately.

On the advice of our vet, he was tested, wormed and placed on a special diet of dog food that would help bring up his weight to a healthy level. We also found that with his better diet, his energy continued to improve and what was before a normally active dog became the super-hyperactive sled dog we knew was hiding underneath all those health issues!

Now that he is looking better and on the road to recovery, his adoption interest went way up and we found him a home where he can put that hyper nature of his to work by pulling a dog sled recreationally for his owner. In a few weeks, after he receives the final test and clearance from our vet, Arrow will join two other recreational working sled dogs and release all that energy through exercise by pulling a sled on the snowy trails of Alaska.

We are thrilled to share the happy ending of this boy’s story! Thank you to the Petfinder Foundation for helping us help Arrow find his way!

Operation Paw Time, Inc.: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

This grant was used for Sully, an adult cat, to cover needed dental surgery.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

As for the organization, this grant helped tremendously. We live in a small town and we are not always blessed with help in donations. Many of the cats that come to us need more than just basic care so they can become adoptable. Getting enough funding for all the medical costs needed for each cat most of the time proves a great struggle. This particular grant we received helped an adult cat named Sully. Sully has had many issues since coming into the rescue but the main issue and the most costly was his need for dental surgery. This grant made it possible for Sully to have surgery and not be in any more pain, making him adoptable.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

This grant helped a rescued cat named Sully. Sully was at [an open-admission] shelter and only a day away from being euthanized. Sully was deemed a feral stray. Upon Sully’s arrival at the rescue, we could tell he was in fact a very loving cat who had just had a rough start in life. He has had many medical issues, but this has not hindered his loving nature. After lots of TLC and many vet visits, including his neuter surgery, we thought Sully would soon be adopted. Then he began to lose weight for no reason and had trouble eating foods, even soft. After yet another vet trip, we learned Sully needed a good bit of dental work before he could finally get better. It has been a long, hard road for Sully, but now thanks to this grant he is completely better and so ready to be adopted.

All Aboard Animal Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

We used the Emergency Medical Grant money to treat and save two rescue puppies who came in with distemper. The first puppy was Snickers, a 3-month-old Plott hound mix, who came in with a runny nose, goopy eyes, and a myoclonic twitch. She was very sick and spent more than two weeks in our veterinary hospital. She was just cleared last Tuesday, July 5. She is now in the clear and should live a long, happy life. The second dog, Tango, a 6-month-old husky mix, also came in with an upper-respiratory infection and a twitch. His twitch was so bad that he was biting his tongue and could not eat or drink easily. Both dogs underwent a lot of treatment but are now happy and healthy!

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped cover a large portion of the medical costs for these two sick puppies. We would have run a fundraiser or asked for donations to keep them alive, but this allowed us to just treat them without having to worry about the costs associated with their care. This grant allowed us to treat the puppies immediately and get them the best care possible. We cannot thank you enough for helping us save these sweet pups. They have now found their forever homes and will live happy, healthy lives since they received the treatment they needed to save them.

How many pets did this grant help?

2

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Snickers is a very sweet 3-month-old Plott hound mix. She was very sick in the shelter she came from down in Texas. They treated her for over a month for an upper-respiratory infection. She was finally cleared to travel to Colorado so that we could get her into a good home and out of danger of being euthanized. When she came in, her eyes were full of green boogers, her nose was runny and she had a very distinct twitch on the upper left side of her face. We immediately got her to our vet, where he diagnosed her with distemper. She fought hard over the next two weeks as we treated her and did everything we could to help save her.

After two weeks, she was doing much better and we decided that she would do better in a home environment to continue her healing. She went to live with a nice woman and man — the man was disabled and confined to a wheelchair — and a big 7-year-old Plott hound sister, Folly. She loved riding on her foster dad’s lap as he zoomed around in his wheelchair. She was content to just lie on her blanket on his lap and go with him everywhere. Her sister Folly also started teaching her how to be a dog and about good things like toys and sticks and rolling in the grass. Snickers has continued to improve and has been cleared from the disease. Her foster family decided to adopt her since she fit in so well and she is now living happily with them. She has almost doubled in size since getting healthy again and is now running and playing like a normal pup. She loves her new family and was so thankful that she was given a second chance at life!

Designer Dog Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

This grant was used to fund the emergency surgery for a dog named Dagoo. He had an accident which severed several toes on two of his paws, requiring emergency surgery to remove them and repair what was left.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The cost of the care of this emergency was over $1,300; this grant helped up pay off the cost of the emergency care, allowing us to continue to rescue other animals in need.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

This grant was used to fund emergency surgery for a dog named Dagoo. He had an accident which severed several toes on two of his paws, requiring emergency surgery to remove them and repair what was left. He was rescued from the shelter and was very nervous and scared. He was in a foster-to-adopt situation when his foster allowed him to go on an escalator, resulting in his feet getting stuck. She immediately rushed him to the nearest emergency hospital, where he had several x-rays done to make sure everything else was okay. He needed a couple of bones in his foot removed, as they were exposed, and then stitched up. He is now healed from the incident and pain-free! Thank you so much for this grant!

Waggytail Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The Emergency Medical Grant was used to partially pay medical bills associated with the repair of one of our rescue dog’s double luxating-patella repair surgeries.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Geoffrey has greatly benefited from having his first knee repaired! This formerly wobbly little man is now walking tall and STRAIGHT! He is strong enough to have the second kneecap surgically repositioned. The $1,000 was put towards the medical bill for Geoffrey’s first leg surgery (total cost $1,951 with neuter).

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Geoffrey was rescued from the medical wing of an overcrowded shelter in Los Angeles as part of our Waggy West rescue mission to bring small-breed at-risk dogs from L.A.’s overcrowded shelters to NYC for adoption. His sweet face and obvious fear melted our hearts, so we scooped him up to give him a fresh start in life! Geoffrey was in a pretty sad state of neglect; he had a yeast infection on his skin, two dislocating knee caps that made walking difficult, teeth that needed pulling, and paraphimosis, most likely due to muscle wasting.

In the several months he has been in foster care in NYC, he has been treated for his skin condition, neutered and had his first kneecap put back in place. With thanks to the Petfinder Foundation grant, he no longer walks with a wobble and can now follow after his foster mom in a much straighter line! Now that he is healed and strong enough, he will be getting his second knee repaired and a dental, and then he will be ready to find his forever home.

Meet Geoffrey: https://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/34714357

Pima Animal Care Center: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Your generous Emergency Medical Grant of $1,000 helped fund a lifesaving surgery for Winnie, a 2-year-old dachshund whom a good Samaritan found horribly injured next to a busy street.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

As a county-run, open-admission animal shelter that takes in more than 20,000 pets each year, we do not have the resources to spend large amounts of money on any single pet. While our doctors are able to do a great deal with the resources we have, there are dozens of pets we take in each year who need specialty surgical services that are beyond what our publicly funded budget can provide. Your grant helped save the life of one of them, Winnie, who would not otherwise have had a chance. Thank you, Petfinder Foundation!

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

It was late at night when one of our Animal Care Officers went to rescue Winnie from the side of a busy road, where a good Samaritan had found her crumpled in the bushes. The purebred dachshund was drooling, one of her front legs was dangling, and she was in excruciating pain. When Winnie was back at the shelter with our doctors, they determined she was suffering from a rare and complicated front-leg fracture caused by being hit by car.

Within our shelter, we are able to cast broken bones or amputate pets’ broken limbs. Those tools help us save many lives, but they wouldn’t work for Winnie. Because of her breed and the high likelihood for her to experience future spinal issues, a forelimb amputation could greatly shorten her life, and it should only be performed as an absolute last resort. Our doctors knew Winnie’s best shot at life would come from complicated and costly leg-pinning surgery that could only be performed by a specialist in Scottsdale, Arizona.

Your generous donation seeded an effort that was met by other donors to a local rescue group, Lil’ Bit of Love. Because of your startup gift, Winnie’s entire surgery costs were eventually covered, and she was able to be taken into that rescue group for her intensive follow-up care.

While Winnie saw an exceptional surgeon, her injury proved too serious and complex to be permanently fixed by the pinning and, unfortunately, amputation did have to eventually take place. While the end result is not exactly what we’d hoped for for Winnie, your investment in her made it possible for her to leave the shelter and have a shot at the best possible life. Now this tiny tripod lives with a family who adores her.

We are incredibly grateful for your investment in her, as well as for your team’s flexibility in delivering the grant. Because of multiple barriers within the county system, we would not have been able to turn a cash donation into a speedy-enough surgery for her. Your team was willing to pay the surgeon directly so that Winnie’s treatment would proceed without delay. Thank you, Petfinder Foundation!

Max's Hope Pet Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The $300 grant was used to remove a tumor from Penny’s abdomen that was the size of a baseball and to correct dental issues that came from years of poor nutrition. As a senior, Penny had probably never had a dental before and her teeth were in bad shape. She also suffered from hair loss and skin irritation from fleas.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant has offered Penny a new chance to be able to run and play without the irritation of the tumor and she is once again able to eat dry dog food.

How many pets did this grant help?

One

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Penny Ann came to us after her mom was placed in a nursing home. She had hair loss and skin irritation due to a flea infestation; a huge tumor on her abdomen; and horrible teeth. At 10 years old, she deserved a chance at a loving home for her senior years. The surgery to remove the tumor was successful and, thank goodness, it was benign. After an extensive dental, she was once again able to enjoy dry dog food because, for the first time in a long time, she was able to chew without pain. Her hair started to grow back and her skin cleared up. She spent some time in a foster home with a lady who owns a boarding/grooming facility. She got to come to work with her foster mom and play with the other dogs and even got some pampering in the grooming room. She was also chosen to visit the Cornell Memory Center, a day-care facility for elderly people with Alzheimer’s disease or dementia (second photo). She loved all the attention and the clients loved her. In April, Penny Ann finally met her forever mom and, after an emotional meeting, she went home to live her senior years with her mom (third photo).

It Takes A Village Canine Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Vet bills for Zeus’s eye removal

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Zeus came to us with a badly injured eye and the grant helped us get his eye fixed and then get Zeus adopted.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Zeus was surrendered to us after he was attacked by a dog and his guardian could not afford the vet bills or to continue to care for Zeus. The grant paid for the removal of his eye so that we were able to get him healthy and find his forever home.

Kansas Humane Society: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

It was used to provide therapy and medical services for Kolache, a stray Chihuahua mix who was presumably hit by a car and had a spine injury.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

X-rays were done on Kolache’s injury and laser therapy and medications were provided. He is now fully recovered and was adopted on May 24, 2016!

How many pets did this grant help?

One

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Kolache was a stray who arrived at KHS with a spine injury. KHS does not have an x-ray machine and cannot perform therapy. The funds were used for radiographs, medication and laser therapy while he was at his foster home. He has now made a full recovery thanks to the support he received from the Petfinder Foundation and was adopted on May 24, 2016.

Furry Friends Foster and Rescue, Inc.: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Tucker is a dog we pulled from [an open-admission] shelter the day before he was due to be euthanized. Tests showed he was positive for heartworm. The money was used to help pay for his treatment, which is now almost completed. He goes back to the vet next week for repeat blood work, which hopefully will show that he is clear of heartworm.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Your grant was of great assistance to us in treating Tucker for heartworm. We always do thorough vetting on the dogs in our rescue and provide whatever treatment is necessary to ensure their continued health and well-being. Your grant helped us to help Tucker, and to go forward and help other dogs in similar situations.

How many pets did this grant help?

one

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We pulled Tucker from [an open-admission] shelter when he was one day away from being euthanized. This handsome hound mix had been on the run for a long time, and then spent a long time in the shelter after he was caught when he decided to raid a chicken coop. When Tucker came to us, he tested positive for heartworm, and we reached out to your organization for help in the cost of his treatment. We are so grateful for your help!

When we met Tucker, he was a very shy, very scared boy who clearly did not have much experience living in a home. Everything was new to him. He would startle at the slightest unfamiliar sound, and it was clear that he had never experienced the love of a human. He was placed in a quiet foster home where he had a chance to decompress and begin to learn what this business of living in a home was all about. He spent several months there and made terrific progress. Recently he was moved to a second foster home. He is nearing the end of his treatment for heartworm, and we suspected that living in a home with other balanced dogs would be beneficial to him. We were right!

Tucker, as do many timid dogs, takes his cues from other dogs. The move has turned him into a different dog! He is seeking human attention, rolling over on his back for tummy rubs, and absolutely loves living with other dogs and having children in the home as well. We even discovered that, although Tucker may have viewed chickens as dinner when he was on the run, he gets along just fine with cats in a home environment!

Once he is cleared medically, he will be neutered, and then will be available for adoption. Because of the help of your organization, Tucker’s present is a happy one, and his future is looking very bright indeed!

West Coast Dog and Cat Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

We had requested help for Bumblebee, who needed an MRI, but at his second visit, the vet found that the phenobarbital he was on was doing the job.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

See below.

How many pets did this grant help?

2

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Luna (first and second photos) had been rescued after being unceremoniously dumped outside after the couple had a baby. She was severely malnourished and almost hairless. The vet diagnosed her with a severe flea allergy and put her on medicine. She was placed in a loving foster home, where she ate voraciously! After several months of care, her hair had grown back in and she was a healthy weight. She found her forever home with a woman who pampers her.

Lumpy (third and fourth photos) was just a tiny kitten when it was discovered he had a hernia. It was a gamble to wait, but we had to since he was so small. He finally gained enough weight that he was able to tolerate the surgery and is healthy and happy now. Hernia surgeries are very expensive and without the Petfinder Foundation’s help, it would have been a challenge to pay for.

Lambertville Animal Welfare: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

To provide extensive dental surgery for extractions plus removal of a growth on the head of Mattie, a 6+-year-old long-haired calico cat who needed the surgery prior to being adopted.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

As indicated above, the Emergency Medical Grant from the Petfinder Foundation supported the surgical costs for a cat whose current foster mom had fallen in love with her and was ready to adopt her once the surgery was completed — thus helping to improve the quality of life for both Mattie and her new adoptive parent. Lambertville Animal Welfare works with Animal Control in 15 townships in Hunterdon County, NJ — one of the only counties in NJ without a public shelter. There is simply nowhere to put animals, so we must foster and get the cats that LAW rescues/saves adopted very quickly. We could not do this without Petfinder!! The majority of LAW’s adoptions come through Petfinder, and we are forever grateful for the great work that Petfinder does.

How many pets did this grant help?

One

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

In 2014 a beautiful calico stray named Mattie was relinquished to Animal Control and turned over to Lambertville Animal Welfare (LAW). Since then, Mattie has been living in some wonderful foster homes, but she needed extensive medical care to become adoptable. Thanks to the Petfinder Foundation’s Emergency Medical Grant, LAW was able to provide Mattie with life-saving veterinary care at one of LAW’s collaborative community partners, Lambertville Animal Hospital, including extensive bladder surgery to remove painful bladder stones and, more recently, two dental procedures and removal of a growth from her head. Providing such dedicated care is key to helping pets become adoptable and a primary concern for LAW. The Petfinder Foundation grant enabled Mattie to receive the treatment she needed and we are so very happy to report that she has now been adopted into an awesome forever home! Mattie’s adoptive mom is an artist who had recently lost a beloved cat and did not think that she could find another cat with as large and colorful a personality as the one she’d lost. But Mattie has filled that role very nicely and is getting a ton of love — and of course, now that she has a healthy mouth, she can eat again without feeling any pain.

Portsmouth Humane Society: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

This money was used for tibia- and fibula-repair surgery performed by Dr. Murphy, Sr., at Anderson’s Corner. The cost of this surgery was $1,600. Total medical expenses spent on helping Prince came to $2,600, which includes the emergency veterinarian bill and our veterinarian’s bill.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Every animal that comes through the doors at the Portsmouth Humane Society receives the finest medical care possible. Often, this means taking on bills for needed procedures such as leg surgery and then figuring out how to raise funds to pay for it. The Petfinder Foundation Emergency Medical grant paid for a major piece of Prince’s medical treatment and minimized the cost of his surgery on our overall budget. Partnerships and support from organizations and businesses are key to enabling our shelter to continue to save lives and provide specialty care as required.

How many pets did this grant help?

This grant helped one very special little dog.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Prince is a 2-year-old stray male beagle who had been hit by a car. He received emergency medical attention and it was found that he was suffering from a fracture of his tibia and fibula. The surgery to repair his leg was complicated due to the breaks being so close to his knee, but he is on the mend. Prince has restricted mobility and regular checks with his doctor for the next two months, but is expected to make a full recovery. He is currently being fostered by one of our volunteers and when he is completely recovered, we will work to find him his forever home.

Heart of Jackson Humane Society, Inc.: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Medical expenses for Shawnee.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant, for the most part, took care of her chronic ear issues and made her adoptable.

How many pets did this grant help?

One – Shawnee, a purebred shar pei.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Shawnee is 2-3 years old and has obviously had chronic ear infections her entire life. After an ear flushing and numerous rounds of medications prescribed by a local vet, Shawnee was referred to a specialty clinic. Various procedures were performed, including a video otoscopy and myringotomy. Her ear was flushed, removing a large amount of debris, and a small hole was made in the ear drum to flush the middle ear and medication was placed in the space. The infection is gone but her ears will need to be flushed twice a week indefinitely. Shawnee was adopted on April 18, 2016. We have continued to follow her progress and she is doing well.

Remembering Ruthie Rescue, Inc.: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The $600 Emergency Medical Grant was used to completely vet two Chihuahua sisters we took in from their owners as they were losing their home and needed to re-home them.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Had we not gotten this grant when we did, we would not have been able to save Alicia and Brie. As a small, one-person rescue in an area where there are hundreds of rescues, we do not receive a lot financial help from donors.

How many pets did this grant help?

2

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

These are the two little cuties we have been posting for foster and funds for. While they haven’t had the best of lives, their owner did the best she could, considering she rescued them from certain death as the family who had the litter was killing them as they were born by flushing one down the toilet and allowing their 13-year-old to stomp another to death. They are 4 years old and pretty social considering they lived on the wood porch seen in the photo.

Brie (the black/tan dog) was born with only one eye. Even though she never had it, she is somewhat more nervous than her sister Alicia. Brie checked out healthy at the vet visit besides some dandruff. Alicia, on the other hand, no so much. She is a very happy, social girl. She doesn’t mind all the other dogs; even though she’s not sure about the bigger ones, she hasn’t growled or anything at them. She’s been running around the house with her tail held high, wagging a mile a minute.

When they got to their foster home they took her out to potty and she didn’t want to come in. You see, they had both lived on a porch, never touching the ground or grass or even getting a lot of room to run. Sadly, Alicia has a few medical issues her sister does not. She is a moderate heartworm-positive, has retained canines, and a luxating patella (a problem with her knee popping out of its socket). Both girls DO NEED DENTALS besides Alicia’s canine removal.

Sunrays Pit Bull Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The grant funds awarded were used to treat our dog Tillie. She came to us and tested positive for heartworm. She received the recommended treatment by the American Heartworm Society, including prescription Heartgard and three doses of melarsomine, followed by Advantage Multi.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant money enabled us to give Tillie the best chance of surviving this horrible disease. She came to us very ill and, even though she is still recovering, has shown us that she is a survivor. She is a sweet girl who is full of life!

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Tillie was in [an open-admission] shelter. When she was transferred she developed a cough. She was taken to the vet where it was discovered that her cough was due to being heartworm-positive. Treatment was immediately started. She received the recommended three doses of melarsomine and Advantage Multi. She is well on her way to being 100% clear of this debilitating disease. She is a happy girl and will make someone an amazing companion. Meet Tillie: https://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/35150642

Beartooth Humane Alliance: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Thanks to the $500 Petfinder Foundation grant, Beartooth Humane Alliance was able to offset the total medical bill of $1,181.51 for a young homeless cat with a rear-leg injury.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

In mid-November, a 6- to 7-month-old intact female kitten was found homeless in a rural Montana town. She was extremely friendly and it was evident she trusted humans and was seeking out human companionship. After a thorough search for an owner proved unsuccessful, the finder surrendered her to Beartooth Humane Alliance for medical care and adoption. In the initial medical assessment, she presented for a non-weight-bearing and painful right hind leg. Upon examination, it was found that her temperature was 103.2, she was grossly underweight, and her stifle [knee joint] was swollen, hot, and painful. Radiographs indicate no trauma and physical exam reveals no punctures or bruising. Some muscle atrophy noted. Our vet treated her with Convenia, an antibiotic, hoping to reduce joint infection, and an anti-inflammatory and pain reducer, Rimadyl. The finder was willing to foster her to provide rest for two weeks. Incidental finding: She had bilateral ear mites and was treated for them.

At the end of November, the follow-up exam revealed the leg was getting worse and more painful and she had a tremendous amount of muscle atrophy up to her hip. The joint was thickened and the vet could palpate bony growth on the medial side of the stifle. It was non-weight-bearing. While the kitten was sedated, her joint was tapped to check for infection via a culture and microscopic examination. During this procedure, she had quite a bit of pain via vocalization. Convenia was repeated and compounded oral tramadol was ordered. Culture reported: no growth.

She showed no improvement by mid-December and, in fact, when she wasn’t holding the leg high enough, her toes hit the ground, causing her extreme distress. Plans were made to amputate on Dec. 17, 2015 including spay if amputation was routine.

During prep for the surgery, the vet noted she had severe muscle atrophy all along the leg. During manipulation, her heart rate spiked, requiring more isoflorane. Amputation was mid-femur and there were no complications, so she was spayed. Prognosis for a full recovery and pain-free life was good.

Named Tripod, she was sent to an experienced foster home on antibiotics and pain-control medications. Gross examination of the joint revealed severe bony growth inside the joint, especially on the medial side, with no normal epicondyles or meniscus.

How many pets did this grant help?

one

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

The day after Tripod’s leg amputation, the foster home reported she was doing well, very happy, getting around without any issues, and seemed overall in better spirits. She was a very sweet patient and, although her medical situation demanded extraordinary attention, we felt that her age, temperament and prognosis for a full recovery required giving her the opportunity to live a long and healthy life. Despite her having three legs, Tripod’s Christmas wish was granted when she was adopted Christmas week by her foster family, who shower her with love and attention.

Here is what one of the foster family’s children, MacKenna, age 11, writes about Gizmo (formerly known as Tripod): “When I first saw Gizmo, I felt worried for her because she couldn’t walk on one of her legs. When I started fostering her I knew that her right hind leg was causing her a lot of pain. Now I am glad that she doesn’t have pain any more since she had surgery. Before she had surgery she hid a lot; now she is coming out more for attention.
       
“We adopted her because she is sweet and a snuggle bear. My little sister, who is 9, and I love to play with our dog, Rose, and our other cat, Bell, and now we have Gizmo. I think she is cool because she likes to lie on her back and get her belly rubbed.”

Rebecca's Rescues: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Rebecca’s Rescues requested the Petfinder Foundation Emergency Medical Grant to assist in covering the costs associated with eye removal for rescue cat Randi.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

These grant funds have not yet been expended due to exceptional circumstances experienced by the cat, Randi, for whom the funds have been set aside for her eye surgery.

How many pets did this grant help?

One will be helped.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Randi came into the rescue from a hoarding situation. To date, the funds received for the eye removal have not been expended. We expected to have the diseased eye removed in January 2016 while she underwent her spay procedure, but extenuating circumstances prevented the vet from removing her eye at that time. During the surgery, the vet discovered that Randi’s reproductive organs were deformed and not situated in the area where they would normally be located. Because of the extended time required to complete the spaying, the vet did not feel it to be in Randi’s best interest to extend her time under anesthesia in order to also remove her eye. The vet expects that the deformation of Randi’s reproductive tract was the result of inbreeding that occurred in the hoarding situation.

Subsequent to the spay surgery, Randi developed an infection, which further delayed the removal of her eye. Currently, Rebecca’s Rescues is waiting for the vet to clear Randi so she may have her eye surgery and finally begin her journey to healing and finding her forever home. Though the funds have not yet been spent for the purpose for which they were requested, once cleared for her eye surgery, Randi will no longer be susceptible to the infections that have been plaguing her diseased eye. This will assist her in having the improved quality of life that she’s been missing since birth.

Bald is Beautiful Hairless and Small Breed Rescue, Inc.: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

To fund necessary surgery for luxating patella for Roxie

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Thanks to this donation, we have been able to provide orthopedic surgery for one of our rescue dogs, Roxie, a 6-year-old Chinese Crested dog suffering from subluxation of the patellas.

How many pets did this grant help?

One

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Roxie came into our rescue from a shelter in New Castle, Indiana, where she had demonstrated some unusual behavior and fear aggression, making her “unadoptable.” Without a rescue stepping in, a dog like Roxie would most likely have been euthanized. After evaluation in foster care, we learned that Roxie had severely luxating patellas. Roxie had her surgery on April 8 and has been resting and recovering well. Since getting her stitches out, she’s been cozying up to her foster brother, Sebastian! Our hope is that the surgery will eliminate her pain and help improve her overall well-being and behavior, making her a dog much more likely to be adopted. Meet Roxie: https://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/34683539

People Helping Paws: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

To help with emergency medical expenses for a dog named Roadie

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It allowed us to have surgery and heartworm treatment done for a dog who, without our help, would have been euthanized.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Roadie was found in southern Missouri unable to use his front leg. It appeared that he had been dragged behind a vehicle and never treated. His front leg had to be amputated. He was also heartworm-positive, which we treated after he was healed enough from his surgery. Roadie is thriving in his foster home. He has several furry brothers and sisters whom he loves, but he is still in need of his forever home. From his Petfinder profile: “Roadie is a black Lab mix with only three legs due to being dragged behind a vehicle. He’s a sweet boy needing a fenced yard. He likes kids, cats, and other dogs. He isn’t a good fit for the farm; he likes to sneak into the chicken coop. His date of birth is June 15, 2014.” Meet Roadie: https://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/34952054

Saving Death Row Dogs: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Surgery for the dogs we took in to our rescue.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Surgery for a small Yorkie we took in from a puppy mill who had a cancerous mammary tumor. We also took in three other puppy mills dogs at the same time who needed to be spayed, and also needed dental cleaning/extractions.

How many pets did this grant help?

4

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Pebbles is a small 8-lb. Yorkie. She’s about 7 years old and spent her entire life in a puppy mill producing puppies for the breeder who owned her. She had no vet care and barely any human contact. She never left the confines of the wire kennel where she birthed and nursed her puppies. The breeder agreed to give her to rescue because she wasn’t producing puppies anymore. We took Pebbles in and took her straight to our veterinarian, where it was discovered she had several mammary tumors, one of which was sure to be cancerous. Our veterinarian had hope, though. As time was of the essence, we scheduled Pebbles for surgery: a complete mastectomy, spay, and removal of all the lymph nodes. We anxiously awaited results from pathology. The results came back that the largest tumor was cancerous, but our vet was able to remove it all. No other cancer was indicated and no treatment was necessary. Tears of joy flowed. Pebbles is now all healed and has a pending adoption where she will live the rest of her life in a warm home with soft beds and a gentle hand — the life every dog deserves.

Bark and Roll Rescue Companions: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Used to treat Kitty Lane’s heartworm infestation

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Were able to provide medical care for Kitty Lane and her heartworm infestation.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Kitty Lane came to our rescue pregnant and with a chronic cough related to her heartworms. Due to the generosity of the Petfinder Foundation, we were able to provide her with the best veterinary care to alleviate her cough — a reaction to the parasite infestation — and provide the proper treatment to rid her of the heartworms and allow her to have the best life possible. We are happy to report she has been adopted and is living the life she deserves, being spoiled rotten, treated for the infestation of heartworms and free from her chronic cough. She should have many wonderful, happy years due to the kindness and generosity of the Petfinder Foundation.

Pet Adoption Alternative of Warren (PAAW): Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

PAAW is very thankful for the grant money received! The grant money helped PAAW pay for above-and-beyond medical expenses for two animals taken into PAAW’s care. The first is Lola, a dog who was a stray. The grant helped pay for Lola’s multiple trips to the vet and her X-rays. The second animal is Kitty, a cat surrendered to PAAW. The grant money was used to pay for her surgery (see story below).

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant allowed PAAW to be able to provide the extra medical care needed for Lola and Kitty. PAAW accepts all animals into the rescue, even if they are going to have large medical expenses. With the Petfinder Foundation’s grant, we were able to help provide necessary medical care to animals in foster and get them adopted into their furever home! The money helps us keep helping animals in need!!

How many pets did this grant help?

Two

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Kitty was a cat who was adopted from PAAW six years ago, but had been having “leaking” problems since shortly after she was adopted. The family surrendered her when they got new furniture and couldn’t deal with the leaking anymore. We took her back in and had anal-gland surgery on her to remove her anal glands, so she no longer leaks. She is a beautiful chubby brown-and-white tabby girl who is just as sweet as can be.

Lola the dog was a stray. After going into foster care, we noticed her limping and the vet determined she had a fractured front leg. Initially the vet thought she would need surgery, but after several visits to the vet and X-rays, the vet decided to not do surgery and let her heal without it. The grant helped pay for Lola’s multiple trips to the vet and her X-rays.

Ark-Valley Humane Society, Inc.: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The $1,000 in grant funds were used for medical expenses incurred on behalf of Dakota (formerly Coffee on intake) and Willow (formerly Lilly on intake), two dogs who were received as a result of a cruelty seizure. Expenses for Dakota included metronidazole, Clavamox, probiotics, glucosamine/chondroitin, sub-q fluids, bloodwork, veterinary diet of canned I/D food, and routine veterinary examinations and monitoring for six weeks. Expenses for Willow are ongoing, as she continues to require metronidazole, probiotics, and prescription food as well as routine veterinary monitoring. Additionally, her expenses included sub-q fluids, bloodwork, Rimadyl, cephalexin, Endosorb, and glucosamine/chondroitin.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

As a small shelter, taking on eight dogs from a cruelty case from a neighboring county was a lot. This grant helped our organization provide necessary medical care to the two most emaciated and sick dogs of the group. As a result, both dogs have been rehabilitated and became available for adoption. Dakota has been adopted and Willow will remain available for adoption until she finds her forever home.

How many pets did this grant help?

2

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Sometimes animals come to us having little and needing a lot. This rang true for eight dogs transferred to our small rural shelter on a cold Wednesday afternoon in January. All husky mixes, Gypsy, Dakota, Zola, Elway, Jenna, Balto, Nana, and Willow came to us as a result of a cruelty seizure in a nearby Colorado county. We had heard prior to them coming that they were in pretty bad shape, but nothing can really prepare you for something like this. After several weeks of total neglect and abandonment, without a consistent food source or clean water in frigid mountain temperatures, these dogs were in bad shape. As soon as the dogs got here, our team went right to work on getting them vaccinated and set up in kennels with water, while tending to any immediate health needs. Some dogs were definitely worse off than others. Dakota and Willow were in the worst shape. Scared and frail, their bones easily visible from weeks without food, these dogs were slow to trust and scared of everything. We knew we had our work cut out for us in order to heal these special dogs from the inside out.

But from the very first time we all had the chance to meet these eight dogs, and despite what they had been through, not one of them was ever aggressive towards us. They were just, simply put, scared. We believe they associated humans with abandonment and possibly harm, not love and nurturing. Knowing that, we prepared for the long road ahead of patience, love, and caring to be shown daily towards these wonderful dogs. With the help of our shelter veterinarian, we formulated a plan of medicines, special diets, handling, and exercise for each individual dog based on their own conditions and needs.

Unsure if Willow (first and second photos) and Dakota (third and fourth photos) would even survive the first night, we paid special attention to their medical needs. It wasn’t long before all eight dogs started to come around, both physically and emotionally. According to some of our animal care techs, these dogs have become some of the most tender and loving animals they’ve ever known. While some are still unsure about going outside and new places, they are all physically in a good place now and are so sweet. With their health where it should be, they truly have a new outlook on life. Dakota, who on arrival had to be carried in, now plays and runs outside like a puppy! You’d never guess his age or his story.

These eight dogs have been through some horrible things. They have been starved and some have even faced death. They’ve survived freezing temperatures and snowy conditions with no shelter or relief. But through the efforts of the staff at Ark-Valley Humane Society, support from the Petfinder Foundation, and the inner strength of these eight incredible dogs to not give up, they made a remarkable recovery and were made available for adoption. Dakota was adopted in February as an only dog by a young woman who fell in love with him. Willow is still up for adoption and can be viewed on Petfinder at http://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/34536416.

Meet the other rescue husky mixes still awaiting their forever homes:
Gypsy: http://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/34363730
Zola: http://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/34363752
Balto: http://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/34543201
Jenna: http://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/34537722

UPDATE: All the sled dogs have been adopted!

Animal Ark Rescue, Inc.: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Medical emergency funds

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

When we rescued Hooch from [an open-admission] facility, he had a badly injured, neglected leg and he was also heartworm-positive. With the receipt of the $500 medical grant, we were able to get Hooch the immediate medical care he needed. The leg could not be saved and had to be amputated. Hooch had already gotten accustomed to walking on three legs and he took easily to the amputation.

How many pets did this grant help?

one

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Hooch had a badly infected, injured leg when we rescued him from an Animal Control facility. We were able to get him the medical treatment he desperately needed because of the grant. Hooch had his leg amputated and received heartworm treatment. A week after his surgery, Hooch found his forever home and moved out to the country with 100 acres to run and play on.

Sweet Dream House Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The emergency medical grant was used for the benefit of Blackie and his sisters, who were rescued from a neglect situation.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant allowed us to pay the vet bills for treatment of the four neglected cockers.

How many pets did this grant help?

4

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Blackie and his three sisters were neglected for years. Volunteers from three different rescue groups worked together to save Blackie and his sisters. When Blackie arrived at Noah’s Ark Animal Clinic in Colerain, the very experienced veterinarians, who’ve seen just about everything in their careers, stopped to watch in shock and then grabbed their cameras to document the horror of his condition. Dr. Adam Tsao and his assistant John Turner worked on Blackie and his sisters for hours, and when they figured out where Blackie’s matted hair ended and his limbs began, they started shaving. What they found was that his skin was ruptured everywhere as the weight of the mats had literally pulled the skin off his body, exposing him to infection and requiring stitches. His ears were covered with softball-sized mats that deafened him and caused very bad infections; his rear end was so matted that he could not relieve himself except back onto himself. There was so much to be done that they decided it would be better for Blackie to be sedated for the procedures. What Blackie has suffered in that house we can never imagine. And yet, neither he nor his sisters ever growled at anyone helping them, and Blackie signaled his thanks with licks and kisses for everyone who worked on him. Blackie got love and hugs, probably for the first time in years.

All four dogs — Blackie, Coco, Midnight and Sugar — are now in their forever homes. Coco had eye issues that we were able to resolve without her losing an eye. Midnight was heartworm-positive and is now treated and happy. Blackie recovered from all the tears on his skin and was adopted by the same family as Midnight. (The second photo is Blackie and Midnight together in their foster home, with Blackie in front.)

See more: http://bit.ly/26y6WXj

Kansas Humane Society: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

To assist with Man Man’s recovery and to get him to the adoptable stage:
Antibiotics – $10
Urinalysis – $15
Food – $9.50
Neuter surgery/microchip/vaccinations – $140

For a total of $174.50. We will report on the remaining expenses of $825.50 for Kolache once pain medications and laser therapy have been completed.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We used $174.50 to help Man Man, a dachshund who came to us with a ruptured disc in his back that left him paralyzed. With the Petfinder Foundation’s help, we were able to provide him with medications and treatments to get him to the adoptable stage. He is now in a happy, forever home with his new family.

We will use $825.50 of the funds for laser therapy sessions and medication for Kolache.

How many pets did this grant help?

Two dogs, Man Man and Kolache.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Man Man (first and second photos) is a 9-year-old dachshund who came to us with a ruptured disc in his back that unfortunately left his back legs paralyzed. He underwent both laser and water therapy, where he swam and walked on an underwater treadmill. Both of those treatments have helped him significantly. Man Man is now happy and healthy in his forever home. Thank you for the emergency medical care grant supporting the cost of Man Man’s care.

Kolache (third photo) is a stray dog, a Chihuahua, that we received in on April 6, 2016, with a severe spinal injury. Our on-site vet believes he may have been hit by a car. He is in a foster home now, but the accident has left a vertebra out of alignment and it causes him great pain. He is on pain medication but is in desperate need of laser therapy to relieve the pain and to help speed his recovery so we can get him to the adoptable stage. Currently, it is also very hard for him to walk. Once he recovers, he will be adoptable and we will find him a forever home too.

Hopeful Hearts, Inc.: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The money was used for hospitalization and medical treatment of an emaciated dog who came into our care after being pulled by animal control officers from an extremely neglectful situation.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant allowed for Toby to receive medical care and treatment that literally saved his life. This poor boy probably did not have one more night in him to continue in the condition that he was in.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Toby was pulled by animal control officers from a neglectful situation. They had been keeping an eye on him and estimate that at their last visit he weighed 85 lbs. When they pulled him, he weighed in at 56 lbs. (first photo). The veterinary staff did not expect him to make it through the night, but much to their surprise, he was up and wagging his tail in the morning when they arrived to work. He is now 110 lbs. and has been adopted into a great home, where he spends much time lounging around with his new sister (last photo).

Mazie's Mission: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The money from this grant was used for the medical care of our dog Dallas.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The money from this grant helped cover part of the cost of Dallas’ medical care, including treatment for heartworms, severe mange, secondary skin infections and intestinal parasites, and tail amputation.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We received notification from Dallas Animal Services and a picture of an unrecognizable breed of dog. He was covered in mange, emaciated, and in bad shape. We knew he needed our help! Mazie’s Mission rallied together, located a foster, and provided the care that Dallas needed. He is still in recovery with his amazing foster, but is doing quite well. As you can see, his coat has become a beautiful brindle-and-white color. He has almost finished his heartworm treatment, had surgery on his tail, has been treated for mange and skin infections, and is intestinal-parasite-free. He’s not quite ready for adoption, but this boy will make a family very happy and lucky. We at Mazie’s Mission are extremely lucky to be able to help the most severely injured and ill animals in the Dallas-Ft. Worth area thanks to grants like the Emergency Medical Grant from Petfinder Foundation!

East Alabama Humane Society: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The funds were used to alleviate the cost of surgery for a stray who had a broken leg.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant lifted the burden of the cost of an emergency surgery, and allowed a sweet puppy to keep his leg.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Laeddis came to us in the arms of a good Samaritan. He was limping down the side of a busy road. He was dehydrated and scared, but in no time he was filled with wiggles and tail wags. We estimated his age at 3 months old. He was taken to our vet and x-rayed. It was determined that his femur was broken and he would need immediate surgery to set it. During surgery the vet was able to estimate his injuries at a few days old. Had he come to us any later, Laeddis would have lost his leg. He had a rod inserted to stabilize the bone and allow him to keep his leg. Laeddis has since been adopted and is living with his new parents. He is in training to be a therapy dog in a retirement home. We could not thank the Petfinder Foundation enough! Thank you for helping us change this little life!

Ozark Haven Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The Emergency Medical Grant was used to provide surgery to restore the use of a leg and hip for a little one who had been hit by a car and left along the highway.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Without this grant, it would have been nearly impossible for our organization to provide the very costly surgery that was required to save and restore the use of this little one’s leg. He now can live a life free of pain, with the full use of his leg!

How many pets did this grant help?

One

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Dexter had a guardian angel! Good citizens spotted a little battered bundle on the side of the road in the pouring rain. The selfless act of picking up this crushed puppy, wrapping him in a coat, and making a call saved Dexter’s life that day. Ozark Haven Rescue answered that call and sought immediate medical care. This poor tiny crumpled puppy had been struck with such force that his hip and pelvis snapped. While homeless pets with medical needs are common, funds are not plentiful. However, with skilled foster care and attentive doctors who performed a femoral head dissection, Dexter had hope. Between experienced therapeutic fostering and the Petfinder Foundation’s support, we were able to turn this adoptable baby around. What was once a doomed little life is now a flourishing, adopted rescue puppy. Dexter now has a long, happy life to look forward to.

Pet Friends, Inc.: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The grant money was used for enucleation surgery to remove a nonfunctioning eye of a cat rescued by Pet Friends.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant helped us provide much-needed eye surgery for one rescued cat. Without the grant, it would have put a strain on our funds and there is the possibility we would not be able to help any of the other cats at the location where Sadie was living. To date, one female cat was spayed and returned to the location where she is being cared for. Five cats from this location have been adopted. Four are in foster care, including Sadie.

How many pets did this grant help?

The grant helped one cat directly, and indirectly helped several others who are adoptable.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

The grant helped us provide the medical care/surgery Sadie needed. Sadie was living outside with a group of other cats. They took shelter in abandoned buildings. A Pet Friends volunteer was trapping in this area with the intent of at least TNR of some of the cats. Sadie was spotted occasionally. The reason she stood out was her right eye. Even from a distance, her eye was a bright red. Traps were set day after day. There were days when there was not even a sighting of her. Then one lucky day she went into a trap. By then her eye was an opaque white color. She was spayed, and it was the opinion of the vet that her eye had ruptured and healed that way. The eye was nonfunctioning. Once we got the grant, her surgery appointment was scheduled. She stayed overnight at the vet and came home the next day.

Since the surgery, Sadie is a different cat. She plays and looks forward to attention. She reaches out with her polydactyl paws and rolls over in her bed. During the surgery, the vet found numerous adhesions. This was probably painful for her. It was truly a blessing we could do this for Sadie, since it not only improved her appearance but also her general well-being. Sadie’s sutures came out and she is healing nicely. She is now ready to go to her special home.

Sadie and Pet Friends will be forever grateful to the Petfinder Foundation for this financial help. Meet Sadie: https://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/34802492

Lone Star Sanctuary for Animals: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

ACL surgery for Kixx

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We were able to pay for the ACL surgery for our long-term resident.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Kixx came to the sanctuary in July 2013 as an 8-week-old puppy. He was dumped with his litter of brothers and sisters, all of whom had demodectic mange. The others were all adopted very quickly, but Kixx was very shy and did not get adopted right away. He was finally adopted in December 2013, but was returned in February 2014 when he was picked up by animal control and the owners could not be contacted. He has lived at the sanctuary his entire life, other than the two months he was adopted. He has adjusted well and loves playtime. Sadly, that is how he tore his ACL. He has a best friend here, Margaret, with whom he runs and plays every day. They do play pretty rough, and we noticed he was limping. We kept an eye on it for a few days, and then took him to the vet. They took an x-ray and thought he had just strained a muscle, so he was confined for about four weeks. As soon as he was off his medication and allowed to play again, he tore his ACL within a day. He has had his surgery and is recovering very well.

Meet Kixx: https://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/34644940

Music City Animal Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The grant was used for medical attention for a dog with a torn ear as well as treating a parvovirus-positive dog.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant assisted Music City Animal Rescue is providing proper veterinary care for the animals in our care. This grant helped us provide help to those animals who needed it most while still being able to help others because it lifted the significant financial burden of extreme medical care costs.

How many pets did this grant help?

2

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Ace came to Music City Animal Rescue from a local shelter where he was scheduled to be euthanized. This poor pup was severely underweight, with scars and burn marks on his body. While he was in our care recovering, Ace caught and tore open his ear, causing severe tissue damage to his ear. This grant helped provide proper medical attention to make Ace healthy enough to be adopted!

M&M's Fur-Ever Furbabies: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Our organization received a $1,000 Petfinder Foundation Emergency Medical Grant that was used specifically for one of our rescued dogs named Reason. She had been severely neglected and abused before coming to us. Reason was in constant pain from having her canines shaven and front teeth pulled out by her abuser, leaving her unable to eat. Already emaciated and malnourished, Reason needed to have dental surgery/procedures done to relieve her pain. The grant was used to provide Reason with the vet care and procedures needed to start her recovery journey.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Receiving this grant helped our organization provide the necessary care needed for one of our previously abused rescue dogs named Reason. Without this blessing our small nonprofit would have struggled to raise the funds needed, which would have taken much longer and could have been detrimental to Reason’s health. Thankfully, Reason was able to start her new life as a happy and healthy girl quickly after the procedures were completed. Because of this grant, Reason is no longer in pain and has gained much-needed weight since she is now able to eat nutritious food.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Reason came to our rescue after being abused and neglected, used for breeding multiple litters of puppies. Upon intake, she was extremely emaciated, weighing 30 lbs. You could see every bone and vertebra of her body. She was dehydrated, starving, dirty, broken and sad, but she trusted us immediately without any hesitation. We noticed her tail had been broken in several places and her claws had overgrown so much they twisted, but the worst of all was that her canines had been shaved down and both top and bottom teeth had been pulled from her mouth, causing her gums to be swollen, bruised and painful. Reason was knocking on death’s door and needed a miracle to save her life!

She was immediately taken to our vet for examination, where they performed standard testing and procedures. Her age was estimated at 2 years old, but because of her mouth, it was difficult to say for certain. For weeks we fed her whatever she could eat without being in pain, which did not help her gain weight or overcome her malnourishment. Returning to the vet, they reexamined her and told us her only option was to have dental procedures to help relieve the pain and correct her biting technique, but that those were not considered emergencies; therefore, without full payment, there was nothing they could do to at the time.

Immediately we began trying to raise the funds on our own to have this done for Reason as quickly as we could. Unfortunately, being a newer and smaller rescue, raising the funds was impossible and almost became hopeless. She managed to gain 15 lbs. after the first month of being with us, but she needed to gain much more. Thankfully, around this time was when we received word that the Petfinder Foundation was going to help us by approving the emergency medical grant application for her procedures. Within days of receiving the funding, Reason had her procedure and was recovering well.

She has been able to eat almost everything she wants to now, even the hard kibble we feed the other dogs. Her testing shows that everything has improved and she has gained 45 lbs. in total as of today. You can no longer see any of her bones or vertebrae and her gums are no longer swollen, bruised or painful, which allows her to be the healthy, happy girl that she has always deserved to be!

Because of the Petfinder Foundation’s grant, Reason is alive without pain and now has a second chance at the life she should have always lived. Meet Reason: https://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/33693174

Sanilac County Humane Society: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Medical bills for a Yorkie named Ozzie who needed surgery on both knees for a condition called patella luxation.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant allowed us to get Ozzie’s surgery quickly so as to relieve the extreme pain in his knees. He had a wonderful adopter waiting for him, but they could not afford the surgery themselves. The Petfinder Foundation’s generosity allowed Ozzie to get the pain relief he needed to become the wonderful, loving and active pet he was meant to be.

How many pets did this grant help?

One: Ozzie the Yorkie

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Ozzie came to us after being in three different homes in a short period of time. He was confused and was nipping at everyone. A thorough medical exam revealed a severe case of patella luxation, a very painful condition of the knees where the kneecaps ride along the side of the leg instead of in the center. No wonder he was nippy — he was in so much pain. We had an adopter, but they could not afford the surgery. Our wonderful, generous vet reduced his fees, and with the grant from the Petfinder Foundation, we were able to schedule the surgery immediately and give this little guy some relief. He has recovered nicely and the real Ozzie is emerging. He is so active and lovable and enjoying his new forever home. We could not have done this without the Petfinder Foundation’s help. You have helped give Ozzie a second chance at a pain-free and loving life. We have thanked you on social media, but there is no thanks big enough to express our extreme gratitude.

Stephen Memorial Animal Shelter: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

We received a $500 emergency medical assistance grant to cover the cost of leg amputation surgery for one of our shelter dogs, Marcellas.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped Marcellas get the surgery she needed to relieve the pain and discomfort caused by a badly broken leg. In addition to directly helping Marcellas, this grant helped our organization get attention through the press releases we sent out telling Marcellas’ story and how the Petfinder Foundation helped her.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Marcellas was a 10-month-old female pit bull mix who came to us as a stray in early December. When she came to us, her right rear leg was hanging limp. The vet thought that this was an injury sustained months earlier that had not been treated, and recommended the leg be amputated. Marcellas was given pain meds to relieve her of any discomfort she might be experiencing while we tried to find a way to pay for her leg-amputation surgery. It didn’t take long for the Petfinder Foundation to let us know that they would be able to help with the costs of surgery, and in mid-December, Marcellas had her surgery done. She had a very smooth recovery and was adopted on Jan. 7, 2016, by a wonderful family that renamed her Beauty.

Cayuga Dog Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

We recently received a $1,000 Petfinder Foundation grant to help cover expenses for this dog, Gemma! Thank you so much!

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Gemma was hit by a car in rural Kentucky when she was 4 months old, breaking both her legs.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Gemma was hit by a car in rural Kentucky when she was 4 months old. In addition to breaking both of her legs badly (see x-ray), she was lodged in the grille of the car that hit her (see horrifying photo). There were no dog rescues down there and no good orthopedic options, so she suffered for several weeks without good care while the cat rescue down there used social media to try to find a dog rescue group to take her. That was us! Trying to figure out how to get her fragile self here as quickly and safely as we could (we didn’t want her in and out of dozens of cars over two days trying to make it up here using regular car-transport methods), we connected with Pilots-n-Paws, a nonprofit organization of volunteer pilots who fly special-needs dogs to rescues, free of charge. Three flights and less than a week later, Gemma arrived to us in Ithaca, N.Y., so she could get treatment at Cornell University Hospital for animals, under our care, and join our foster-care program. She got excellent care from the Cornell orthopedics and sports-medicine doctors, and was ready for adoption about four months later.

She was adopted by a lovely Ithaca-area couple who are so in love with her, they can’t stop emailing us to thank us for bringing her to them! See photos of her at the initial accident site, and her time with docs and in foster care here, as well as a pic of her with her adoptive momma!

Thanks again for helping with the finances of taking care of Gemma!

Best Chance Animal Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The money was used to help treat two dogs for heartworm infection.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It helped treat two dogs for heartworm disease, one of whom, if we can get his other health issues under control, will leave for his forever home in April.

How many pets did this grant help?

2

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

This grant helped sweet Aloe the Chihuahua become heartworm-negative. He is tiny and had a really rough start in life; his family neglected many of his critical needs, so we took him in, neutered him and got him his shots. It was then that we realized he was heartworm-positive. After giving him his antibiotics and everything, we noticed something else. One of his eyes was getting larger, and it was his good eye. You see, his other eye was already blind due to an old injury, and now this eye was getting large. We took him to the vet and found out, yes, it would have to come out and was more than likely glaucoma.

So now this sweet 5-lb. boy who finds it hard to put weight on is not only heartworm-positive but is also blind — but that never stopped his spirit one bit. Thanks to the Petfinder Foundation’s grant, we were then able to afford treatment for his heartworm disease. He still has some health issues going on, but now he is well on his way to being able to travel from the south of Tennessee to Paris, France, where his adopter is waiting for spring, when Aloe will finally be able to leave for his forever family should he finally be healthy enough. Thank you for everything, Petfinder Foundation.

Orphan Animal Rescue & Sanctuary: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The grant received was used to offset the costs for an emergency dental visit for one of our adult cats.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Our organization is completely volunteer-driven and funded only through grants and community fundraising. Dental visits are not cheap. This grant helped offset the costs associated with an emergency visit.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Tessa came back to us because her owner was no longer able to provide for her. Once she was back in our care, we noticed she needed some serious dental work. Despite the costs, we got her in as quickly as possible and they ended up extracting three teeth! Through resilience (and a lot of wet food ^_^) Tessa was able to quickly bounce back and found her forever home on Nov. 29, 2015; she is now happy and healthy!

Dog Town Canine Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Emergency veterinary care for injured dog Rucker.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant allowed us to obtain critical veterinary care for a seriously injured dog. Once his mangled leg had been removed, he was no longer in pain and was able to be adopted.

How many pets did this grant help?

One dog, badly in need of help.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Rucker came to Dog Town after being confiscated by local tribal law enforcement. His owner had run him over with her car and left him chained up in her yard. She never bothered to take him to a veterinarian, and he was left for two weeks with no shelter or medical care. He was seriously injured, with a completely broken femur, and dislocated hip. These funds helped pay for a complete amputation of his mangled leg. Despite the neglect he had suffered, Rucker remained a happy, trusting dog who loved people and other dogs.

Shortly after his surgery, Rucker was adopted by a family who was touched by his story. He is now part of a great family, and is very much loved.

Freedom Farm Animal Sanctuary: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

We used the money for Felicia, a rescued cat with a large open sore on her stomach.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The money helps us keep rescuing. Felicia’s medical bill was just under $1,000 and, for a small rescue, that was a lot.

How many pets did this grant help?

The money replaced the money we paid for Felicia, which in turned helped us rescue 10 more animals in need.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Our dog coordinator received a call from a family that had previously adopted from FFAS. The neighbor’s kids had found a cat and brought her home. Their mom wouldn’t let them have her, so she was put back outside. The family that called us was concerned because the cat was obviously in poor health. FFAS immediately agreed to take her and our coordinators met with the mom to pick Felicia up. When we got there, she had Felicia in an open plastic tote. Even though we’re sure Felicia was probably scared, she never tried to escape.

We could tell from looking at her that she had an upper respiratory infection, and she was terribly thin. When we picked her up, we also discovered she had an open wound on her stomach. It was the size of a golf ball and, though we couldn’t tell what it was, we knew it had to be painful. We took her to the vet the next day. It was determined that she is 8 years old and she was diagnosed with an upper respiratory infection, ear mites and what our vet thought was an old abscess that had ruptured. On the bright side, Felicia tested negative on her FELV/FIV/heartworm tests and she was already spayed.

The vet started her on several medications and some ointments that were put on her wound three times a day. Before long, Felicia started feeling better and was putting on weight. The wound started healing, but then stopped after a few weeks. We discussed different options with our vet, but the safest was to go ahead and remove it for testing. The vet wanted to make sure it wasn’t cancer. Luckily the test came back cancer-free, but there were still bacteria in the wound. Felicia was put on a stronger antibiotic. She is now completely healed and ready for her forever home.

We would like to give a heartfelt thank you to the Petfinder Foundation. Felicia’s medical care cost FFAS just under $900, and the Petfinder Foundation awarded us a grant to cover her medical care so we can continue rescuing! We are so fortunate to receive this grant, along with everything Petfinder does to help FFAS find loving homes for our animals.

Capital Area Rescue Effort, Inc. (CARE): Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Emergency medical needs – surgery

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This money was used to help with surgical costs for one puppy, Carley.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Carley came to CARE at the age of four weeks from [an open-admission] shelter in South Carolina where she was to be put down. She was diagnosed with a rectal fistula. That shelter gives medical-needs dogs only 24 hours to find rescue, and a local supporter pulled the dog for us and helped to transport her 10 hours to CARE in Richmond. Carley arrived on Friday, July 31, and was immediately taken to our vet, Dr. Susan Ware, for evaluation. Dr. Ware stated that Carley had a condition known as atresia ani, a congenital birth defect that is fatal in most cases. She suggested euthanasia, but said she was amazed that Carley was otherwise healthy.

CARE decided to take Carley home and care for her over the weekend and visit Virginia Veterinary Surgical Associates on Monday morning, as one of the specialists there had some history of treating the condition during his time at Cornell. On Monday, we took the dog in and were told that she needed emergency surgery. Her rectum did not open to the outside of her little body and had, instead, created a passageway for stool to travel through her vagina out. Not only was the condition extremely painful for her, it caused a severe urinary tract infection that was becoming septic.

Carley’s surgery was immediately started and she was given a 50/50 prognosis. During surgery, it was discovered that only one passageway existed between the two areas (the best news possible). It was surgically closed, and a new area (anus) was opened for fecal elimination. Carley healed well and her infection immediately cleared. She is now seven weeks post-surgery and her prognosis is a normal life. Upon completion of her puppy shots, spay and microchipping, Carley will be placed for adoption and is expected to have a wonderful life. The funds contributed by the Petfinder Foundation allowed our rescue to pay about 1/3 of the surgical costs for this dog.

Sweet Dream House Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

See below.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We were able to try to save Hopeful’s leg. She is now a tripod and very happy in her new adoptive home.

How many pets did this grant help?

one

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

The Emergency Medical Grant was used to pay for a surgical procedure for Hopeful. She was found dragging herself by her two front legs, as her two back legs had been crushed. They were able to save one of her legs but the other was too badly injured. She saw a specialist here in Cincinnati and they tried, but were unable to save the second leg. She is now a tripod and very happy in her new home.

Azalea City Cat Coalition: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

This wonderful grant had a myriad of benefits: Since we were able to cover the costs of Crush’s broken-leg surgery, our organization could also assist another injured cat whom our volunteers found during their normal trap-neuter-return work! Peeper, a skinny orange-and-white cat, was hiding under a tool shed with his eye hanging out.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

With this grant we could also continue our assistance with spaying and neutering 10 other cats for low-income families in our community

How many pets did this grant help?

12

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

This Emergency Medical Grant was earmarked for Crush, a timid orange-and-white cat who was found in a commercial dumpster in the back of a PetSmart. Her little tiny body was seen scurrying away from underneath a garbage bag which had been thrown in the receptacle. With a tight lid on the dumpster, this little kitty was sure to be taken away once the truck came to retrieve the waste! So we put on a pair of gloves and jumped into the container to rescue this scared kitty. Crush has always been skittish since she was rescued and is often picked on by the other foster cats. One day this spring she fell and broke her leg; it was a very severe break which required pins and surgery with several weeks of rehab, including laser therapy. After months of recovery and several trips to the vet, Crush’s leg is just like new! We can’t thank the Petfinder Foundation enough for its generous support in helping this worthy rescue get the medical care she deserved.

Also pictured below (fourth photo) is Peeper, the other cat we were able to help, who needed surgery to remove an eye shot out with a BB gun.

Luv of Dogz Fund: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Medical care for Jessica the boxer, who had to have two surgeries

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Helped to pay for medical care for dogs in need

How many pets did this grant help?

It helped cover Jessica the boxer’s two surgeries

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Jessica was found wandering in the desert, emaciated and with her uterus prolapsed due to abuse and neglect. With the help of the Petfinder Foundation, we were able to get her the surgeries she needed and she found a wonderful home.

Beagle Rescue of Southern Maryland: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The money was used for surgery for a small beagle with untreated glaucoma. One eye shrank down to the size of a raisin. The other swelled up and pressed on the optic nerve, causing severe pain for the dog. Both eyes, sightless anyway, were removed.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We were able to ease the suffering of this dog and found her a forever home. She had a friend, another beagle, who was very shy. They were extremely bonded. He provided her with sight and she provided him with confidence. They are together in their forever home, with a few other blind beagles.

How many pets did this grant help?

Two, the beagle with the glaucoma, and the bonded beagle who needed her companionship.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Dixie Rutherford came to us with untreated glaucoma. In severe, constant pain, she would cry out when even petted on the head. We were able to get the medical surgical treatment Dixie needed so quickly with the help of the Petfinder Foundation in the form of a $1,000 grant. It was a true blessing.

Dixie had been dumped with and was very bonded to Ben. Well, we couldn’t leave him, so Ben and Dixie Pixie are still together. Here (second photo) Dixie and Ben catch a quiet nap together, which they love to do.

Here are some notes from Dixie and Ben’s foster mom. The evening before surgery: “We love Ben and Dixie. The night before Dixie’s surgery, my husband and I put the kids to bed and then sat on the couch. Ben curled up on Jimmy’s lap and started to snore, and Dixie curled up next to me. We looked at each other and knew we were both thinking the same thing. It was love.”

A few days after surgery: “Here’s a pic of Dixie this morning. She has a little dried discharge on the right that’s like cement and I don’t want to pick at her face, but the swelling has gone down considerably and a big thing was that she slept on her side last night! I’ve never seen that before; it was always too painful for her to sleep on her side because of her eye. She woke me up this morning with her tiny nose on mine and then rolled over on her back for me to pet her belly! My heart is full.”

A couple of weeks after surgery: “She is a happy-go-lucky little sprite of a beagle! She is so happy now, all healed from surgery. She has our house and yard mapped out and is confident in her steps now. She greets me when I get home from work every day, wiggling her tiny rear! She loves her new brothers and sisters (2 others are blind) and they accepted her right from the start. We love her (and Gentle Ben) soooo much! Thank you, Petfinder.com and Beagle Rescue Of Southern Maryland!
–Dixie and Ben’s Foster Mom”

Dixie is happy and no longer in pain because of the generosity of the Petfinder Foundation and its grant program, along with the never-ending support of donations from kind caring people who have hearts of gold!

Three Sisters Pet Rescue/Ohio Hound Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

A senior dog named Henry. He came to us with very badly infected teeth. He required a surgery to repair an oral-nasal fistula.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The $$ went directly to the surgical fees.

How many pets did this grant help?

One.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Henry, a senior dog, came to us with very badly infected teeth. He was seen by our vets and attempts were made to fix his oral problems. But he developed an oral-nasal fistula and required the attention of a veterinary dental specialist. Sponsor a Pet donations went directly to his surgical fees. He has since been adopted!

The Washington County Humane Society: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Medical bills for Grace, a pit bull mix who was hit by what we believe to have been a snow plow.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Grace’s bills topped out at almost $4,000. The $1,000 that we received paid for a portion of her surgery to have her eye removed.

How many pets did this grant help?

Just one – this was specifically for Grace

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

It was a cold winter Wisconsin day when a woman came into the shelter telling us of a dog in her car who had been hit by a truck or car. We assume it was a snow plow because of the hole that had penetrated her head. The dog was covered in blood, but her tail never stopped wagging! We couldn’t see much physical damage to her but knew her injuries were severe. She had major road rash on her legs, hypothermia had set in (she had been nearly frozen to the ground) and she had a perfectly round hole near her eye. Her poor head and eyes were swollen, but all she wanted to do was give kisses and be next to you. We struggled to get her to relax as we tied her to a dog bed and drove her to the emergency vet. Grace received lifesaving treatments there, but it was going to be touch-and-go for the first 36 hours. She pulled through and proved just how strong her will to survive was.

After she’d had some time to heal, we could tell something further was wrong with her eye: It was cloudy and not moving as it should. Grace was losing sight in her eye due to the muscular damage and it would be in her best interest to remove the eye. Grace was adopted the day after she was on her adoption floor and even has her own Facebook page (https://www.facebook.com/pages/Gracee-Pryor/1414679835505527). Every time we look at her photos, we realize this is why we do what we do: We are truly the voice of the animals!

One Love Animal Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The grant was used to care for our dog Grace. She arrived to our rescue on transport with a clear case of carpal hyperextension.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

With this grant, we were able to get Grace pet physical therapy for her legs. We would have struggled financially with her medical expenses without the help of the Petfinder Foundation.

How many pets did this grant help?

One, Grace.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Grace came to One Love in early February 2015. When she arrived off the transport caravan, we could tell immediately that she had a big problem with her legs. Her wrists were collapsed from the normal upright position, making her paws look long and flat. This type of deformity is called carpal hyperextension, and it’s caused by poor nutrition during some critical growth periods.

Grace was taken to the vet immediately. They discussed splinting her legs at a future appointment. Grace went back to her foster home to rest and recuperate. She was put on the same five-star food that all of our foster pets receive. Amazingly, after just over a week of good nutrition, Grace’s leg deformity began to correct itself! The power of good food should never be underestimated! It was later decided that splints were not needed, but Grace should see a specialist.

Besides the issues with the front legs, the hind legs were also challenged and Grace continued to have mobility issues. On the advice of our vet, we took Grace to Pet Physical Therapy (Pet PT) to work on both her front and hind legs. Building strength now was preferred to splinting since she had already come so far with the food and activity.

Dr. Russell Howe-Smith of Pet PT saw our Princess Grace and determined that her overall joint laxity was secondary to poor nutrition and confinement/inactivity prior to rescue. He prescribed the use of the underwater treadmill to build strength and tighten tendons. Grace received this therapy twice a week for six weeks.

We are happy to report that Grace was released from Dr. Howe-Smith’s physical therapy after the six weeks were completed. Her prognosis: very good! Her muscle strength has improved dramatically. Her orders? Keep fit with straight-line walking and playing in the back yard. She doesn’t need any pain meds, either!

Grace is now healthy and active and about to be adopted shortly! We have included pictures of her with her forever family, and we couldn’t be more pleased with her terrific transformation.

Once again, we owe a big debt of gratitude to the Petfinder Foundation for providing us with a $1,000 emergency medical grant to help Grace recover. This kind of help is critical to the work of rescue and allowed us to give this sweetheart the best care possible.

Happy Dog Adoption: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

To pay for an operation on a puppy hit by a car whose leg was broken at the hip, and causing great pain and making him unable to walk.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It gave this 5-month-old puppy a chance to heal and to walk, and got him adopted!

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Beaux, a 3-4-month-old shepherd pup, was hit by a car and came to our rescue in a lot of pain, unable to walk and starving. We took him straight to our vet and x-rays showed damage to his pelvis, a broken ball joint on his leg at the hip and bone scraping on broken bone. His prognosis, if left untreated, was a life of pain and a bad leg, compounded by hip problems — and he will grow to be big dog. The grant enabled us to get him into surgery right away and get the bone fixed. He is recuperating wonderfully, and is a happy boy now that the pain is gone. He is a very loving puppy and is getting adopted now that his prognosis is good for his age.

ABRA, Inc.: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

This money went directly towards the surgical bill for a puppy we pulled from [an open-admission] shelter who was left abandoned at animal control with a broken leg that needed immediate surgery to repair.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This money prevented us from having to deny any other animals rescue due to a very high vet balance. As a donation-run, foster-based rescue, keeping our vet balance controllable and paid is the only way we can continue to save the lives of those most in need every day.

How many pets did this grant help?

Immediately it helped one, but in actuality it saved all the other animals that were able to be pulled because we were able to contribute to their vetting.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Fergus was a 4-month-old puppy left abandoned at a local animal control with a broken leg. A woman claimed to have found him in that condition and held onto him for a few days before turning him over. The poor pup was very underweight, filthy, and in pain, but trusting. Fergus was pulled by ABRA, Inc., and taken into surgery to have his little leg repaired by a surgeon. Fergus now has two medal rods permanently implanted. He then spent the next 10 weeks recovering in a loving foster home where he left a permanent footprint. Fergus had a terrible start, and no one will know how he was injured so badly, but even in pain he was the sweetest, most loving pup I’ve ever encountered. He now has two human sisters and a doggy brother that he gets to love on every day for the rest of his life.

The Pepper Foundation: Emergency Medical Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The funds were used to help a little 1-year-old Spaniel mix named Harley who came out of the shelter with pneumonia.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant was used for Harley’s emergency medicals and has helped him completely heal from his pneumonia. He is now in a foster home and they are very much in love with him and are seriously considering adopting him.

How many pets did this grant help?

It helped one doggie.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We were at the Lancaster shelter looking at another doggie when we noticed this little guy jumping up and down trying to get out of the run. He had so much life in him, but at the time we could not take another doggie. Days went by and we thought for sure since he was so cute and young he would have gotten adopted. But he did not and they were going to euthanize him, so of course we rescued him and gave him the name Harley. We noticed that after they neutered him, he began to cough non-stop and had a hard time breathing. We rushed him to our vet, where he was diagnosed with pneumonia. It was touch-and-go for five days, but he pulled through and is now the happiest, most fun-loving, adorable, tail-wagging doggie! We are so grateful for your emergency grant to help Harley and could not have done this without your help. Thank you so much, Petfinder Foundation! Harley says thank you also! xoxox