Dogly Do Good Grant

K9 Paw Print Rescue: Dogly Do Good Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

This money went towards the veterinary bills for our medical dogs. These dogs are in need of medical care beyond the routine vaccinations, spay/neuter, kennel-cough treatment, etc.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

K9PPR strives to rescue as many dogs in need of extra medical care as possible. We are known for pulling abuse cases, parvo pups, dogs in need of surgeries and those with many other conditions. Many of these dogs are overlooked at the shelters due to the projected expense of their care. We believe that medical dogs deserve a chance at life and a fresh start, and this grant boosted our continuously-depleted medical fund, allowing us take on more medical dogs.

How many pets did this grant help?

We were able to help five dogs with this grant!

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Coco/Mistletoe is an adorable senior bichon/poodle mix who was dumped at the shelter at age 14 by her owner. The reason given: “Illness.” She was suffering from a severe bronchial infection, collapsing trachea, dislocated hip and was desperately overweight. Her condition was extremely dire and her cough was unbearable to hear. She was scheduled to be put to sleep the day we pulled her and we were able to save her in the nick of time. Her condition was completely treatable with extensive rounds of antibiotic therapy, bronchodilators, physical therapy and the loving care of her foster family. We are happy to report that Coco was adopted by a wonderful family and relative of one of our coordinators and is now completely spoiled and loved.

Lawrence Humane Society: Dogly Do Good Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The $500 Dogly Do Good grant was used to provide advanced medical care and dental procedures to more than 20 Yorkshire terriers and papillons who entered our care as a result of a Department of Agriculture seizure.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This Dogly Do Good grant provided support that allowed the Lawrence Humane Society to dedicate resources to the care of more than 20 dogs who entered our care as the result of a state seizure. The dogs had been severely neglected and were in need of advanced treatment.

How many pets did this grant help?

20

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Noah, one of the more than 20 Yorkshire terriers and papillons who entered our care via a state seizure, had been severely neglected. His fur was long and matted, and due to the lack of grooming Noah had received, some of his fur had gotten into his mouth and wrapped around his teeth. In addition, the poor, scared little pup had severe dental issues. The situation broke the hearts of every employee at the Lawrence Humane Society. Thanks to the Dogly Do Good grant we received, our staff and volunteers were able to provide Noah — and all the dogs that came from the seizure — the care and attention they needed, including advanced dental procedures, grooming, and lots of love.

Noah soon gained confidence, and his personality started to shine. Once he made his adoption debut, it was only a matter of days before he found an incredible home with a family that cherishes him.

Best Friends Animal Society: Dogly Do Good Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The Dogly Do Good Grant from the Petfinder Foundation was used to support the No-Kill Los Angeles (NKLA) Pet Adoption Center (PAC). The PAC is changing the landscape of adoption in Los Angeles and is a place where the collaborative spirit of the NKLA Coalition can be seen in action. It’s a beautiful, welcoming space with interactive technology where more than 2,700 cats and dogs were adopted in 2015!

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant helped us care for the animals at the NKLA PAC while they waited for adoption. With capacity to house 80-90 dogs and 50-60 cats, half of the PAC’s kennel spaces are reserved for NKLA Coalition members to showcase their animals pulled from L.A.-city shelters. This means that half of the animals that get adopted from the PAC were pulled from shelters by Best Friends, and the other half were pulled by other rescue groups. The PAC provides 24-hour animal care for all pets, trainers, and volunteers, facilitates the adoption process for every pet, and passes along all the adoption revenue to Coalition members. The Dogly Do Good Grant helped support these operations and in particular the enrichment we give every dog who is waiting for their forever home.

How many pets did this grant help?

80

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Filthy, underweight, and covered in wounds—that’s how Samson arrived at one of the L.A.-city shelters. An NKLA Coalition Partner, Labs and Friends.org, pulled Samson from the shelter and brought him to the NKLA Pet Adoption Center for healing and adoption. “When I arrived to pick him up, a staff member had to carry him out,” says volunteer Lotta. “He laid him on the pavement by my car, and Samson just laid there, no willpower to stand.” For weeks, Best Friends staff and volunteers worked tirelessly with Samson to help him build confidence, overcome his fear of people, and heal from a life of neglect.

While Samson was regaining his trust in people, U.S. Marines veteran Doug was searching for a therapy dog with the help of another NKLA Coalition partner, Hounds and Heroes. Doctors helped heal Doug’s physical wounds after he survived an explosion in Afghanistan in 2013, but he was left with emotional scars. Like many veterans, Doug was battling PTSD, so doctors suggested he get a therapy dog. Doug visited the NKLA Pet Adoption Center and met a few candidates, but he didn’t make an instant connection until he met Samson.

Doug was drawn to how well Samson stayed by his side on-leash, giving him the sense of security he desperately needed. “When no one’s around, I’m on edge,” says Doug, who endures seizures, frequent headaches, and vivid nightmares about combat since his service. “But just having Samson around makes me more comfortable and relaxed.”

Labs and Friends.org was so moved by the instant friendship that Samson’s adoption fee was waived. “It was our small way of saying thanks to the troops for all they do for us,” says Julie Jones, founder of Labs and Friends.org. “We wouldn’t have a free country if it weren’t for veterans, so we just wanted to do something.”

Bonnie-Jill Laflin, founder and CEO of Hounds and Heroes, says Samson’s instant effect on Doug isn’t a surprise. “So many veterans get paired up with a dog and then tell me that it has saved their life,” she says. “The suicide rate for veterans is now 22 per day, so not only are you saving a dog’s life who would have been euthanized at the shelter, but you’re also saving a hero’s life.”

While that may seem like an obvious win-win situation, Bonnie-Jill says it still takes teamwork among rescue groups and shelters. “Best Friends has been such a great help with all of the NKLA Coalition partners,” she says. “Everyone’s been so helpful and just phenomenal in the way they handled this situation. It was a total team effort.”

Adopt-A-Pet: Dogly Do Good Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The money from the grant was used for training for two dogs who had been in our shelter for a very long time. Both dogs developed behaviors on top of bad manners from living in the shelter environment for 6+ months. Both dogs needed extensive training after making mistakes and biting due to someone grabbing their collars or grabbing a toy roughly, or jumping and biting to get attention.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Bethany came to our shelter with her eight puppies. She stayed at our shelter for six weeks while she nursed her pups and weaned them. She developed a fear of children and new men and became barrier-aggressive. She was declining and needed more help than we were able to provide. Bethany went to a three-week training at a trainer’s facility. She was able to learn proper behaviors in just one week. Bethany was able to calm herself down and self-soothe and suddenly had no problems with children, men or other dogs. Bethany was adopted and shares her home with another dog whom she adores. While Bethany was away at training, it allowed space for three new dogs to be rescued and adopted.

See below for Theodore’s story.

How many pets did this grant help?

This grant directly helped two dogs with the special, intense training. Indirectly, there were five other dogs who benefited from Bethany and Theodore going away to training.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Bethany (first four photos) came to our shelter with her eight puppies. She was a wonderful mom. She stayed at our shelter for six weeks while she nursed her pups and weaned them. She was not a fan of other dogs around her. She was fearful of certain men. While she stayed at our shelter, she developed a fear of children and new men and became barrier-aggressive. She got along great with one dog and not any others. Her emotional health was declining and she needed more help than we were able to provide. Bethany went to a three-week training at a trainer’s facility. She was able to learn proper behaviors in just one week. Bethany was able to calm herself down and self-soothe and worked it out so that she had no problems with children, men or other dogs.

Bethany had a family who became interested. They were impressed with her behavior and training. They brought their current dog to meet her and they hit it off immediately. She was adopted and shares her home with another dog whom she adores.

Theodore (fifth photo) was also a dog who is currently receiving training due to the grant. He has been with us for almost a full year. He was rescued from Detroit, where he had been tied to a tree and starved his whole life. He had some “quirks” and behaviors that we were able to work with. Sadly, he developed new behaviors and fears. The time in our shelter caused him to spin, become aggressive toward other dogs (he wasn’t when he first came), and start protecting items in his room. In addition to the those unwanted behaviors, Theodore also became very nervous and reactive. We knew we needed him to be worked with and called the trainer. He is currently with her for three weeks to focus on working on the undesired behaviors and allow him to get back in touch with himself.

Theodore has a gentleman interested in him but no adoption yet. By him going to training it has opened up his room to allow for more dogs to enter our system for adoption. Theodore’s Petfinder link is https://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/33674060.

Pug Rescue of Austin: Dogly Do Good Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Pug Rescue of Austin spent 100% of the Dogly Do Good grant funds ($1,000) on essential veterinary care for dogs we rescued this summer.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The Dogly Do Good grant has helped Pug Rescue of Austin continue its mission to rescue and rehabilitate abused, neglected, and homeless pugs in the central Texas area. Thus far in 2015, we have rescued 108 dogs, 42 of whom were rescued over the last two months. Thanks in part to the generous funding received from the Petfinder Foundation, we have not had to turn away a single pug in need and have been able to provide the essential veterinary care they needed to become adoption-ready.

How many pets did this grant help?

5

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Thanks to a Dogly Do Good grant from the Petfinder Foundation, Pug Rescue of Austin was able to save Wally and provide the medical care he desperately needed. Wally is a senior pug who was seen wandering around the Walnut Creek Trail in Austin, Texas, for about a week in July. He had been visiting with people and soaking up attention but was overheating because of daily temperatures above 95 degrees. A good Samaritan picked him up, took him into her air-conditioned car, and contacted Pug Rescue of Austin for help. Wally was immediately brought to the veterinary clinic and was in early heat stroke upon arrival, with a body temperature of 105 degrees. After he was cooled down and stabilized, it was discovered that Wally had a microchip that traced back to the local shelter, where he had turned up as a stray a few years prior. The shelter located a previous owner who claimed that Wally had been given to her but that she did not want him. Thus, Pug Rescue of Austin assumed full responsibility for his care and paid for the medical treatment he needed for his various maladies.

Wally had severe ear and nasal-fold infections, rotting teeth that were causing intense pain, and arthritis, and he was covered in fleas and filth (see photos). When Wally was bathed, his clumped fur and matted undercoat were stripped away to reveal a beautiful, squeaky-clean boy. He was then vaccinated, started on pain medication and antibiotics for his infections, and subsequently underwent dental surgery to remove all the abscessed teeth. Wally now looks and behaves like a different dog from the poor soul who had been knocking on death’s door when he was rescued. He is now living without pain or infection, has started losing weight, and is a joyful, outgoing pug. Wally is living the pampered, indoor life that he deserves in a loving foster home and is now available for adoption at https://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/32711892/

Sacramento County Animal Care and Regulation: Dogly Do Good Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Since the donation was granted via a submission from a former foster provider who fostered a sweet boxer/pit bull mix with serious medical issues for almost two years, we decided the most appropriate use of the funds would be to apply them to our special medical needs fund to help other animals in need.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The donation has gone toward helping animals in our care with special medical needs, specifically toward a pit bull with Demodex.

How many pets did this grant help?

One

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Sven came to us as a stray, emaciated and with a terrible case of Demodex. He was clearly not well cared for, and we just had to save this gentle and sensitive boy to ensure he gets the life he deserves. He’s now fully recovered and ready for adoption! Sven would love a family who will appreciate his calm, mellow personality, and continue to help him blossom into the sweet, laid-back boy that he is becoming. Sven is a very gentle and sensitive boy. Sven loves children big and small, and is quite tolerant. He is very gentle, even with little ones. It’s unrealistic to think any dog will never accidentally knock over a toddler, but Sven is pretty careful. His foster mom says his personality is similar to several Golden Retrievers she has known. He is a big-time “mama’s boy,” although we think he could easily be a “daddy’s boy.” He is very attached to his main “person,” even though he loves the rest of the family very much.

He has come a long way since he came to the Shelter as a stray. He was VERY anxious and had bad separation anxiety at first (wouldn’t you, if you were lost from the only home you had ever known?), but he has settled down to be a really pleasant dog at his foster home. He needs an experienced confident owner who will respect his fears and gently encourage him to continue to overcome them. In order for him to keep improving and becoming more confident, he needs a family who will avoid exacerbating his fears by reinforcing them either negatively or positively. Meet Sven: http://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/32729982/

Come Bye Border Collie Rescue: Dogly Do Good Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

We at Come Bye Border Collie Rescue (CBBCR) are very appreciative of the $1,000 grant money received as a result of our participation in the Dogly Do Good fundraiser. Our volunteers continue to participate and are having fun with it!

Needless to say, this grant money came in at a very good time. After treating four cases last year, we had one of our foster dogs going through heartworm treatments already this year and recently found that a new intake is also heartworm-positive. We continue to try to educate people when it comes to heartworm testing and preventative. It is such a preventable disease.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

see above

How many pets did this grant help?

It has helped at least two heartworm-positive dogs and there may be more bills for an elderly dog we recently took in to the rescue who has seizures.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Clark, now Rudy, came to us as an owner relinquishment. His owner could not keep him in his yard even though he was trained with an e-fence. Once the kids next door got out their four-wheelers, that was it for this active herding breed. He would herd those critters with four wheels one of these days! Rudy’s owner gave him so much freedom and he never used heartworm preventative, which is such an easy but super-important thing for dog owners to do. Rudy came to us and was immediately placed with a foster home where he could have had a blast playing with the other dogs. But with a heartworm-positive dog, they cannot run and jump and play for fear of the heartworms damaging their system before, during and for a period of time after the treatments which are such a financial drain on rescues. Rudy is on the upside of his treatments and he is getting lots of inquiries for adoption. You will be sure that we will place him in a home with a responsible owner who will make sure he never gets heartworm again! Meet Rudy: https://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/31837330/

National Mill Dog Rescue: Dogly Do Good Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Funds were used to defray veterinary medical expenses for Wren, a 10-year-old puppy-mill survivor we rescued in February. Her expenses far exceeded the amount of the grant, but we are so very grateful to have received the $500 toward her care. See below for details.

Because of the poor health that puppy-mill dogs have to endure, and because of our commitment to give them all of the treatment they need to be restored to health, our expenses for outside veterinary care run about $9,000 every month. This is in addition to the average $240 per dog for standard care in our in-house clinic.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

See below story about Wren. She is just one of nearly 10,000 dogs we have rescued in our eight-year history. It is our goal to save as many as we can and to educate the public about the sad realities of the commercial dog-breeding industry.

How many pets did this grant help?

one

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Wren, a 10-year-old former breeding dog in a Midwest puppy mill, was in sad shape when we rescued her earlier this year. She had a luxating jaw and an old fracture on the right side of her little face where some of the bone was missing. As a result, her pink tongue slides out of the side of her mouth — now very cute, but not so cute before! She had mammary masses, which are common in puppy-mill dogs who have been repeatedly bred for years on end and never received veterinary care, She had untreated infections, which left her ears swollen and painful.

Wren had jaw surgery, spay surgery, mammary-tumor surgery, plus the standard vaccinations, deworming, microchipping, and a ton of TLC from dozens of volunteers, who have comforted her and loved her every single day since she arrived at our Peyton kennel on Feb. 4, 2015.

Wren was part of our Hundred Hearts rescue — the largest in our eight-year history — which brought 100 dogs from mills in Kansas, Missouri and Arkansas home to freedom.

Wren has recovered well from all of the trauma in her past life. She is ready and willing to meet her lifelong family and become a treasured family pet. Meet Wren: https://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/31497232/

A Way for a Stray: Dogly Do Good Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

All of our funds go directly towards the needs of our rescue dogs.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Necessities such as food, medication, vaccines, spay/neuter and microchipping occur daily and are what consists of the basic care for our animals. We take on severe medical cases that sometimes require the attention of neurologists, orthopedic surgeons and other specialists to assist with the rehabilitation of our injured animal. These visits and treatment plans can be costly. We also take in many dogs that have heartworm and need to undergo treatment.

As well as medical needs, we also provide any and all supplies to our foster homes during our rescue dogs’ stay. Items such as a bed, leash, collar, food and preventatives are supplied to our foster parents so they are not burdened with the cost of an additional pet and can focus on giving them all the love and care that they have been missing for so long. Most of our foster parents refuse the donation and provide it themselves. They ask for those supplies to be left for the next foster home. This is why we take such great care of the foster homes we have and the dogs they care for.

Our efforts only go as far as our funds and foster homes, so this is the most important part of our organization. We were so happy to be a part of the Dogly competition and cannot thank this site enough for the generous donation provided.

How many pets did this grant help?

10+

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Being in the rescue world, there are certain images that haunt your mind. And with each and every defeated soul that crosses our path, we always think, “Well, it can’t get any worse than this.” But somehow, the city of Miami, FL, never ceases to amaze us. Today, we received a haunting photo of a puppy lying lifeless on the streets of Miami. She was en route to the pound, and we knew immediately that we had to do something. How could today be National Puppy Day and here lay this lifeless creature, just a puppy herself, knocking on death’s door.

Immediately began the text messages, emails and phone calls to coordinate the rescue of this sweet soul. We knew right away that what she needed was a miracle. And thus, Miracle came to A Way for a Stray. Miracle will be staying at South Kendall Animal Hospital until she is healthy enough to be released into foster care. We do not know who did this to her, or how she got to this point, but we are certainly trying to piece the puzzle together.

What we do know so far is that she has been given a body score of 1 out of 9, meaning she is as emaciated as can be. She is around 14 weeks old. She is 3.7 pounds and has a good appetite. She has come back negative for a deadly disease called parvo. She is receiving subcutaneous fluids since she is extremely dehydrated, and has some minor blood coming out of her rectum. She is also missing her tail and we don’t know how or why — we just hope it is not because of a human being’s doing. We hope that with time, medical care, and, most importantly, love, this will all be a distant memory for baby Miracle.

Rochester Animal Services: Dogly Do Good Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

We used these funds to help pay for our cat and dog enrichment programs, which include Kongs, Nylabones, cat toys, etc.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We get some of these enrichment items from public donations but not nearly enough to sustain the nearly 6,000 animals that pass through each year. A few times each week, volunteers come through the shelter to give these special treats to the animals to help them stay happy, healthy and mentally stimulated while they await their forever homes. It is important to helping the animals pass time in a playful way each week.

How many pets did this grant help?

Best estimate is 50-60, but some of them will continue to be used with new animals that stay at the shelter.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Bella was with us for more than 45 days awaiting a forever family to find her. We knew this 3-year-old beauty would make a great companion for anyone. She loves agility and running through tunnels and can catch treats in the air. She is a sweet girl who loves to snuggle in the volunteers’ laps. Bella kept a clean kennel and loves riding in the car. Without these important supplies, Bella would not have stayed mentally engaged during her stay to stay stable and find her new family. Thank you so much for helping us continue to help Rochester’s homeless pets.