Dog Field Trips/Short-Term Fostering Grant

Second Chance Animal Services: Dog Field Trips/Short-Term Fostering Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The money was used to purchase treats, poop bags, and supplies for our dog field trip/short-term fostering program. The supplies are always needed to keep up with ones that need to be replaced or to replace consumable products so that the program always has what is needed for the pets to go out in to the community. We purchased treats, poop bags, and some new leashes so that we had additional day-out bags ready to go. This will be especially helpful with the current epidemic: Having additional supplies will ensure that everything is properly disinfected and limit any possibility of cross-contamination.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Doggie field trips help provide shelter pets with an opportunity to get out of the kennel and get some enrichment. It also helps to promote them as adoptable in the community and really showcase who they are. Sometimes the change in the location where people meet them can also highlight the dog’s personality and show people what a great fit they could be in their home. For example, a dog who is active and goes out on a field trip for a hike might meet someone in the community who really enjoys hiking and would love a partner.

We had to temporarily stop the program due to COVID-19 and are really excited that, with restrictions being lifted, it can begin again. Many people have felt isolated and depressed these last few months and are looking for things to do, and this will be a wonderful way to help a pet in need while providing an activity and companionship to someone who is lonely and still distancing for safety.

How many pets did this grant help?

Six and counting

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Hutch benefited from the field-trip grant. He was lucky enough to be one of the first to go on a field trip since we had to temporarily stop the program due to COVID-19. Hutch is an awesome dog and unfortunately, due to an ear infection, he has to be in the shelter for a little longer while that is treated.

He enjoyed his field trip and time away from the shelter. His favorite part is the car ride, and you can see just how happy he is in the car! He has not yet been adopted as he is waiting to be medically cleared. He has a wonderful personality and loves to be with people and go for walks — and, of course, car rides — so we don’t think it will take long for him to be scooped up. Maybe someone who signs up for the Dog’s Day Out or someone he meets along his travels will find him irresistible and come back for him.

We have only had a few dogs participate since receiving the funds due to a temporary hold on the program because of COVID-19. With restrictions lifting and trails beginning to reopen, the program is starting back up, so the funds will help many more pets in the very near future. This program is so helpful for the animals we care for, especially the longer-term residents. At Second Chance, we do not shy away from medically needy pets who may have to be with us longer than average, so this program is ideal for those cases and, of course, the tougher-to-place pets.

SPCA Florida: Dog Field Trips/Short-Term Fostering Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

We purchased supplies for the doggie dates and doggie pajama parties: Harnesses and leashes, water bottles with bowls for dogs, bandannas, and backpacks to hold supplies.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant allowed us to purchase necessary supplies so we can prepare kits in advance. We have enough to let several dogs go on dates at the same time, and we can clean everything as soon as a dog returns and re-pack to be ready for the next trip.

2020 has been a strange year for everyone, including SPCA Florida, and we had to close the facility for some time because of the COVID-19 situation. We have recently restarted the doggie dates and sleepovers, and this has, naturally, impacted our statistics. But 35 dogs still went on dates before the pandemic threw its wrench in the works.

The question “how many pets did this grant help” is difficult to answer — 35 dogs have used the supplies thus far, but many of the supplies will last for a long time and are likely help hundreds before they’re worn out.

How many pets did this grant help?

35

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Letty is a special-needs girl with allergies, so she needs a hypoallergenic diet. She came to SPCA Florida in August 2019 and stayed here through the holidays, through a pneumonia outbreak in the kennels, and through the COVID-19 closings. When the doggie dates and pajama pawties started again in June, Letty was eager to go on a sleepover. The family saw how well she fit into their home environment and decided to make her a permanent family member. Happily Furever After!

City of Bloomington Animal Care and Control: Dog Field Trips/Short-Term Fostering Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Supplies to support our Slumber Buddies program and its launch

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It allowed us to provide a standard experience and allocate staff time to the program, making it successful.

How many pets did this grant help?

22 so far

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

The Slumber Buddies program came about at the beginning of 2020. We had enormous community interest and were able to get to know the animals in our program a little better through short-term fostering, and could find them better adoptive matches because of it. Echo is a 2-year-old Lab mix who came to the shelter very under-socialized. She was fearful in the kennel and we did not know much about her personality. She was sent into a short-term foster with a wonderful young lady who was unable to adopt or foster long-term, but loves dogs. We learned a lot of cute facts about Echo in the foster home that helped her connect to her adoptive family. We learned her favorite treats, that she loved to cuddle up in bed, and that she was a super quick learner of tricks! Echo gained confidence and was able to hold on to that when she came back to the shelter, where the kennel wasn’t so scary any more. Echo was adopted and has been happily loving her new family for more than three months now.

Kokomo Humane Society: Dog Field Trips/Short-Term Fostering Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

We used the money to purchase martingale collars and Gentle Leaders.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The purchase of these items made it much easier to handle the dogs out in the world and also safer for the dogs themselves. It reduced the risk of the dogs slipping out of collars and getting lost, and also made walking more manageable. By using the correct equipment, we can ensure the safety of the dogs and make the experience for the volunteers much more enjoyable. Through this, we have had volunteers return over and over to participate in the Dog Day Out program.

How many pets did this grant help?

The grant helped approximately 120 dogs.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Nova (first and second photos) was singleton who did not do well in playgroup and consequently didn’t get much exercise. She spent a lot of time in the kennel and was licking herself raw in some places from anxiety. Dog Day Outs helped her relax and get some good-quality people time, which is what she loved the most.

Her Dog Day Out partner said this: “Took Nova on a dog day out yesterday. She’s such a doll! We went to Lowe’s, where she leaned into everyone for pets. She sits and shakes very nicely for treats, doesn’t pull much on the leash, and decided she would rather me lift her into the car instead of jump in herself. She loved leaning her head out the window while we drove, too! She’s a really good girl. Thank you for letting me take her out for the day.”

Ember (third photo) was surrendered to us because her owner didn’t have enough time for her. She is a great dog, filled with energy and ready to take on the world. This was exactly what her Dog Day Out friend saw and dressed her in a Superwoman costume for her day in the woods. It didn’t take long for someone to see her superpowers and adopt her.

Wings (fourth and fifth photos) went on tons of days out. She ended up in foster with her main Dog Day Out human. They run up to 12 miles together. When Wings would come back, all she would do was sleep for hours. She has now moved in with her Dog Day Out person as a foster and they have decided to adopt her as a permanent family member.

Ace (sixth photo) was so scared and snippy in the kennel, we never knew just how sweet he could be until he was picked to go on a Dog Day Out. After his person spent some days with him, she was able to give us more insight into his personality. We were then able to promote him accurately and he received tons of interest, which eventually led him to finding a forever home.

Saturn (seventh photo) and Mars (eighth photo) were two brothers who came in together as strays. They were very high-energy and couldn’t be kenneled together. They did really enjoy playing together, and going on days out was a great way for them to take nice long walks and spend quality time together. This also helped learn to behave better with each other. They were both adopted, but to separate homes. They went on multiple days out with the same volunteer, who reported: “Another successful Dog Day Out. Saturn and Mars enjoyed ice cream and squirrel-watching at Foster Park with us yesterday! These guys are just the sweetest brothers and were so much calmer for us than expected outside of the shelter.”

The Kauai Humane Society: Dog Field Trips/Short-Term Fostering Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

We are currently working with Rescue Strong to purchase backpacks for our Shelter Dogs on Field Trips Program. We have the design created and the order placed, but with the onset of COVID-19, they have not been able to complete our order as of May 4, 2020, due to stay-at-home orders.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Once the stay-at-home orders are lifted, we hope to get the backpacks to our shelter as soon as possible. The state of Hawaii might not see visitors/tourists to our islands for many months, so at the moment, we are unable to resume our field-trip program. Once the program can start again, it will have a whole new look with new custom vests and backpacks.

How many pets did this grant help?

It will help up to 200 per year.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We are currently unable to run the program, but can update once it resumes. Attached is a photo of a completed backpack.

Salt Lake County Animal Services: Dog Field Trips/Short-Term Fostering Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Backpacks, leashes, harnesses, “Adopt Me” vests, “Adopt Me” bandannas, “Adopt Me” leash covers, poop bags and holders, and dog water bottles.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped us get all the supplies needed for our Hounds Around Town field-trip program.
This program will help us learn more about the dogs here and get better photos, helping them get adopted faster.

How many pets did this grant help?

So far we have had 25 field trips done.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Teddy (first and second photos) was a 1-year-old Lab with LOTS of energy. Going on his Hounds Around Town adventure helped him get out and explore. He was able to go for a short hike and get a bath. He was adopted one month after arriving in the shelter.

Carroll County Animal Services: Dog Field Trips/Short-Term Fostering Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

To buy leashes and harnesses for our Come Over Rover program, which gets adoptable dogs out of the shelter for a couple of hours or the weekend.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

By getting the harnesses, we were able to send dogs out on field trips safely. There is no fear of them getting off the harness, and they are double leashed thanks to the money received.

How many pets did this grant help?

18

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Yesterday is a beautiful husky mix who was brought in as a stray by a member of the public. She didn’t want to bring him to the shelter, but she didn’t think she could handle him. He was heartworm-positive and while he was being treated during his stay at the shelter, the finder kept coming to to visit him. This is about the time we started the Come Over Rover program and she started to take him home for the day, then overnight, always saying she couldn’t adopt him. But she fell in love and bonded with him and she finally decided to adopt him. He is now happy and healthy and living the good life. I believe she never would have adopted him without knowing him first. Being able to take him with the safety net of bringing him back, she fell in love.

Hawaii Island Humane Society: Dog Field Trips/Short-Term Fostering Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

We used the money to purchase sturdy, safe, functional harnesses in a range of sizes for all three shelter locations. Shopping on Amazon, and purchasing gently used harnesses, allowed us to purchase 19 harnesses for our shelters. More harnesses means more opportunities for dogs to go out on field trips, as we had previously been limited by the amount of supplies we had available.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The purchase of the harnesses allowed us to grow our Field Trip for Shelter Dogs program, and meant that more dogs could go out on any given day. It also did something more than expected, which was that, by the Field Trip program growing, it brought much-needed levity and happiness to our staff. We love seeing animals go out of the shelter, even for a day. It paved the way for more hope for the future. We are now looking to grow our Field Trip program even further, and this wouldn’t have been possible without the additional supplies!

How many pets did this grant help?

Countless! Because we used the grant to purchase harnesses, which we can reuse, the impact of the grant was that we immediately saw an increase the number of animals who could go out on a field trip on any given day, and that impact endures.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Our Field Trip for Shelter Dogs program is thriving. As we grow, we are able to support more dogs and their journeys to forever homes every day. Each field trip is special, as it’s an opportunity for dogs to not only get out of the shelter, but to make a connection. It’s challenging to pinpoint one specific story because each dog matters. Since we are located in Hawaii, our field-trip participants are often only visiting our island. We often hear the same lament: “Oh, I wish I could bring him/her home!” We’re proud to say that we can make that happen! Like for senior dog Boogie (first photo), who went on a field trip with a couple on their honeymoon, and ended up being the missing piece in their life. He was adopted and traveled home with them all the way to Boston.

Or for Ehu (second photo), everyone’s favorite shelter pup, who was a docile senior lady diagnosed with advanced arthritis. Ehu went on a low-key field trip with a couple from Alaska and they just couldn’t part with her. She made the long trek home to Alaska and is now learning how to pee in the snow with her new pack of rescue dogs.

And locally, we have been using our field-trip program as a means to advocate for the dogs who really need a break. It allows us to get to know them better, snap photos, and involve the community in rallying for the dogs who really need a chance. We’ve developed our Field Trip All Stars list, which means that our dogs with the longest length of stay are a priority for getting out. It has opened up a whole new world for us and our dogs.

Humane Society of Southern Illinois: Dog Field Trips/Short-Term Fostering Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

We purchased the following supplies for the hiking program and other outings:
– 14 harnesses (six “Adopt Me” and eight “Easy Walk”)
– 14 “Adopt Me” leashes
– 10 slip leads

On top of all that, Friendly Dog Collars Worldwide, the company we purchased the “Adopt Me” items from, sent along an additional two “Adopt Me” leashes and three “Adopt Me” collars!

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helps our shelter by providing us with quality harnesses and leashes that not only ensure the safety of the dogs (and volunteers), but also boldly advertise their adoptability.

How many pets did this grant help?

We currently take out about five dogs/month and the items we purchased with this grant are helping keep the dogs safe (the slip leads have lowered our anxiety a lot!) and letting the community know that they are ready for their new homes. And we can now safely take out as many dogs as we have hikers! We have, at any given time, 10-12 dogs in our adoption program; the hiking program is growing and we hope to be able to soon be hiking with ALL of those dogs.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

The dog who immediately comes to mind is Alfie. He’s a young yellow Lab with lots of energy and no sense of personal space. He is extremely excited in his kennel, a real handful on a leash, and generally just a LOT of dog.

One of our most experienced volunteers, Dawn, has worked with Alfie on multiple hikes and we are all amazed at the progress Alfie has made even in the short amount of time Dawn has been able to spend with him.

He used to yell in the car allllll the way to the hike and alllll the way back; he is now much calmer and shows improvement with each ride. On the hikes, he used to walk and pull and do his own thing, but he has recently started to stop and check in with Dawn (he still pulls, but has gone from pulling 100% to about 70%). He used to bark at strangers, but has backed off on that quite a bit since he realized that being quiet and paying attention earns him delicious treats!

We are so proud of the progress that Alfie has made and feel that he is a great example of why it’s so important to the health and future of these dogs to get them out of the shelter and into the world, even if just for a few hours a week.

Alfie is still available for adoption. You can meet him here.

The Animal Foundation: Dog Field Trips/Short-Term Fostering Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

This grant allowed us to purchase 16 pairs of booties, for $36 each, for our Foster Field Trip program.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Our shelter dogs use these booties when they go on foster field trips. The booties protect our shelter dogs’ feet from the hot Las Vegas pavement and anything else that might hurt their feet.

How many pets did this grant help?

This grant has helped 25 dogs so far and will help hundreds more dogs in the future.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

GG, a 6-year-old pit bull-type dog, was at The Animal Foundation waiting to be adopted for more than six months — a long time for a dog to endure the shelter environment. Our Animal Care Team watched as GG’s behavior changed over the months, slowly turning from calm to assertive, an indication that she wasn’t doing well. We knew we had to take action, so we sought out some of our volunteers to take her to the park and spend time with her, to let her be a dog and enjoy life outside of the shelter.

Two volunteers, Kimberly and Julissa, were more than happy to help GG explore and have some outside fun! They spent a few hours walking and seeing the sights at a local park, and then they stopped for a yummy treat, which GG devoured with delight. This simple outing did wonders for GG. Two days after her field trip, she was visited by a potential adopter. GG presented her happy, calm self, which sealed the deal.

After more than six months of waiting, GG was adopted! The booties we were able to purchase gave her access to the outdoors despite the hot pavement, and they will give even more dogs the ability to enjoy foster field trips year-round. Foster field trips contribute to our dogs’ health and wellbeing, which affects their adoptability. Thank you for helping these dogs!