Dog Field Trips/Short-Term Fostering Grant

Kokomo Humane Society: Dog Field Trips/Short-Term Fostering Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The money was used to purchase leashes, collars, and gentle leaders to use for Dog Day Out adventures.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped as it gave us the ability to purchase equipment that we needed for the program. Having martingale collars and matching leashes gives the program a professional look and makes the animals more adoptable. Being able to provide gentle leaders for dogs who pull more makes it easer for people to walk them and gives more dogs the opportunity to participate.

How many pets did this grant help?

At least 50 dogs so far, but this will continue to increase as we can use the leashes and collars over and over.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Betsy Altic brought two of her children to take a dog out for a Dog Day Out. They were not looking to adopt, just looking for a fun summer activity. Betsy simply asked for a dog who would be good with her 8- and 10-year-old kids. They were assigned Cooper (first three photos). They spent the day together, and even walked Cooper to the grandparents’ house for a visit. By the end of the day, they were in love. They came back the next day and adopted Cooper, and it has turned out to be a perfect fit.

When I started volunteering at the Kokomo Humane Society, I walked dogs. Since there are dogs who do not get along with other dogs, they need to be walked separately and do not participate in play groups. At one point, most of the dogs needing to be walked were hard pulls or JAM dogs. I was not comfortable walking those dogs. So, I decided to do laundry and dishes.

However, I was still able to see and hear all the dogs who came in abused and neglected. My heart broke for the animals. I was becoming depressed and at first did not know why. Then it occurred to me, I was always blue after I had worked at the shelter. With a heavy heart, I told the volunteer coordinator I was not able to go to the facility any longer. It was taking its toll on me emotionally.

I could not stop thinking of all the dogs stuck in the shelter day after day. So, I decided to be a part of the “Dog Day Out” program. I did it so well that my “day” could be anywhere from a week to adoption day. Once I got them to my house, I tried to keep them until they got adopted. I also liked to bring dogs that had just been fixed. I wanted to offer them a place to rest quietly while they recovered.

The last dog I brought home would change all my plans. We fell in love when we saw how smart and good she was and decided to give Tipi her forever home (last photo).

I would highly recommend people participating in the Dog Day Out program. It is a great way to help the dogs by getting them out for a while and, you never know, you just might find a keeper!–Deb Tipton

Salt Lake County Animal Services: Dog Field Trips/Short-Term Fostering Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The money from this grant was used to purchase field-trip supplies for our Hounds Around Town program. These supplies are used to promote pet adoption, provide safety, and apply care while shelter pets are away from the shelter and out on field trips with fosters and volunteers.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant provided additional funding during a time our organization is financially struggling due to the the ongoing effects of COVID-19 and recent budget cuts. Purchasing field-trip supplies for our Hounds Around Town program not only helped to improve the quality of life for our shelter dogs, but also increased their overall adoption rates.

How many pets did this grant help?

12 and counting!

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Janice (first and second photos), a 3-year-old black mouth cur, went on a three-hour field trip on July 1, 2021, where she got the chance to enjoy a few car rides, a bath, and a tour of Liberty Park. During this field trip, we found out that Janice absolutely loves to explore and would do well in any type of home environment. Janice was officially adopted Aug. 7, 2021.

Doyle (bottom three photos), an 11-month-old American English coonhound, went on a 1.5-hour field trip on July 23, 2021, hiking through Neffs Canyon. During his field trip, we found out that Doyle is very active and affectionate and loves to greet new people. Doyle is still available for adoption at Salt Lake County Animal Services.

Friends of Strays, Inc.: Dog Field Trips/Short-Term Fostering Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Friends of Strays used the money to purchase “Adopt Me” leashes and collars, branded tote bags, Easy Walk Harnesses, poop bags, water bowls, and seat belts for our Doggy Day Out program.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Our facility was originally designed to house cats. When we started accepting dogs a few years ago, we established housing for up to 10 dogs, but it was not ideal for longer-term stays. The Doggy Day Out program is vital to our dogs’ mental and physical well-being. By getting out of the shelter, even just for a day, the dogs come back rejuvenated. It also definitely helps us get them adopted faster when we show their trips on our social-media outlets. It helps potential adopters to see the dog in real-world scenarios.

How many pets did this grant help?

40 so far this year

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Shay was brought to Friends of Strays by a local church member. The church members were helping one of their congregants who had lost their housing and needed a place for their dog Shay to stay until they could get stable housing again. When they didn’t hear back from Shay’s owner after a while, they decided to bring her to us, knowing that we were a no-kill shelter.

Shay’s Doggy Days Out were heartwarming for the staff, who knew that Shay was depressed from being at the shelter and away from her owner.

We are pleased to report that Shay’s owner found us after getting stable housing and was able to bring Shay back into her home. The Doggy Day Out program helped get Shay through a very difficult time and we’re glad she’s been reunited with her “mom.”

Second Chance Animal Services, Inc.: Dog Field Trips/Short-Term Fostering Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The grant funds were used to purchase supplies for our Dog’s Day Out program, including leashes, leads, “Adopt Me” bandanas, treats, toys, water, poop bags, and treat dispensers. These supplies are combined into supply backpacks that are provided to all Dog’s Day Out volunteers. Dogs wear a bright fluorescent “Adopt Me” bandana on their field trip that attracts the attention of would-be adopters in the community and helps to spread the word about the dog and our shelter.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

These grant funds help to replenish supplies used in our Dog’s Day Out program. This program connects volunteers to dogs in our care who need a chance to get out of the shelter and into the community on a one-day field trip. These trips do wonders for the animal’s mental well-being while exposing them to new situations and potential adopters. Volunteers complete a survey after the field trip which stays with the pet’s files to provide further info to potential adopters about how the pet reacts in situations outside our care.

How many pets did this grant help?

35

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Henry is a hound dog who was surrendered to us and needed some medical care. After treatment, Henry was ready for his new home and became the love of many of the staff. Henry is sweet and gentle and, like all hounds, enjoys life most when his nose is on the ground. Henry enjoyed his “Day Out” with our volunteer, taking a nice long walk on a local nature trail. Henry is currently living with a foster who is in the process of adopting him.

Pope Memorial Humane Society Cocheco Valley: Dog Field Trips/Short-Term Fostering Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

We were able to purchase supplies for foster field trips, so field-trip bags are always packed and ready to go:

● 20 collapsible bowls
● 10 long leads
● 15 “Adopt Me” bandanas
● 6 “Adopt Me” leash sleeves
● 2 “Do Not Pet” leash sleeves
● 10 first aid kits
● 6 dog air horns

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Being able to purchase supplies for field trips has been crucial in helping us to grow our Foster Field Trip program. We are now able to have several bags packed, allowing more dogs to go on field trips simultaneously.

Since implementing the foster field trip program earlier this year, our volunteers have taken over 35 foster field trips with 14 dogs. Of the 14 dogs taken on field trips, eight have been adopted, and the others continue to enjoy their breaks from the shelter.

Field trips have not only provided stress reduction for our dogs, but they have been important in helping our adoption staff learn about the dogs in our care. We learned, for example, that one of our dogs absolutely loves swimming! He is now happily living with his forever family on a lake. Additionally, our dogs have gained more “real world” experience and enrichment during their trips. They have been able to visit parks, hardware stores, outdoor cafes, and the homes of our volunteers.

Word has spread quickly about the Foster Field Trip program, and we have several new volunteers ready to start taking dogs on field trips. We are confident that this program will continue to gain popularity, and that we’ll be able to help many more dogs.

How many pets did this grant help?

14

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Loki (first photo), a large 5-year-old dog who came to us as a stray, was in our care for over 100 days. He had the opportunity to take several field trips with different volunteers during his stay. Loki went hiking, walked through parks, and visited several volunteers’ homes. At first, Loki was afraid of getting into a vehicle. With a little practice, a lot of patience, and the help of our field-trip volunteers, Loki learned that he had nothing to be afraid of; he gained confidence and became the best canine copilot in no time. Soon, he became excited to jump into the car for new adventures!

We learned that although Loki didn’t like walking around the shelter property, he absolutely loved walking, running, and exploring outside the shelter grounds. We also learned, based on interactions that took place at the homes of our volunteers, that Loki was able to peacefully coexist with cats.

It turned out that Loki, who was always stressed and anxious at the shelter, was quite calm and well-mannered on his trips. This information helped our adoption team to place him with his new family, where he shares his space with a feline roommate and spends plenty of time exploring the outdoors!

Mary S. Roberts Pet Adoption Center: Dog Field Trips/Short-Term Fostering Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Supplies for field trips, including backpacks, leashes, travel water bowls, and poop bag holders

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It allows us to now “brand” our dogs and have them stand out while they are on field trips. We have successfully placed several dogs since our grant award.

How many pets did this grant help?

10

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Sharing this wonderful pupdate: Meet Ms. Brandie. This sweet gal was adopted on May 27th by a longtime supporter of our organization. Brandie’s new family first met her while the pretty pup was on a vacation from her kennel during a Riverside Rovers outing. Her mom shares that during that visit, “Brandie swept us off our feet.” She then shared that, “Brandie is a delight; smart and very loving. She was meant to be as we lost our beloved pug, Misters, last year and we waited until we were ready and Brandie knew it and she melted our hearts. She is a true blessing and we just love her.” Yay! We are so happy that Brandie and this family seem to be the perfect fit, and we wish them many years of fun and love.

Cabot Animal Support Services: Dog Field Trips/Short-Term Fostering Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The grant was used to create go-bags for our Hounds on the Town Doggie Field Trip program. Specifically, we purchased canvas bags with our logo, “business” cards to hand out to anyone interested in a dog while on an outing, Adopt Me bandanas, water bowls, poo bags, pens and folders for outing-goers to write up a report card, and custom logo stickers for the water bowls and for windows of businesses that allow pets.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We have seen an increase in the number of Hounds on the Town outings, which directly resulted in more rescue tags, fosters, and adoptions. In addition, we’re noticing happier, sleepier pets when they return from an outing.

How many pets did this grant help?

Thanks to supported self-rehoming and public return-to-home methods, the number of pets in the shelter has decreased. Currently, nine individual dogs have been able to go on outings; of those, four have been able to go out more than once.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Mr. Rogers (first and second photos) was our resident old man. He was having a hard time finding a foster or adopter because of his age. A community member took him out on a Hounds on the Town outing and showed off his “young dog” side. As a result, he was quickly tagged by a rescue organization!

Raj (third and fourth photos) had kennel anxiety during his stay at the shelter. As a result, he didn’t show well in the kennel to potential adopters, and rescues were hesitant to tag him based on his exhibited behavior. Through his Hounds on the Town outings, Raj’s anxiety decreased and he was adopted by a loving family!

Humane Society of Northeast Georgia: Dog Field Trips/Short-Term Fostering Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The grant money was used to purchase products for our ExPAWditions/Field Trip program. We purchased: 27 Mendota slip leads, four Adopt Me leashes, five Adopt Me collars, two seatbelt harnesses, one four-pack of Adopt Me leash sleeves, three reflective harnesses, six Passport harnesses (S,M,L), and 10 large reusable bags.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant helped our organization buy necessary supplies so our dogs can safely go out in public on field trips. We purchased highly visible Adopt Me items to make the rescues stand out when out of the shelter.

How many pets did this grant help?

45

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Jolene (first photo) went on her first field trip about six weeks ago. She spent the day on the Pooch Pontoon relaxing. She was adopted soon after, but returned for being “mouthy.” She went on her second field trip last week with a local news crew who are doing a story about our field-trip program. We are hoping that the news story will find her future owner! Meet Jolene here.

Buzz was adopted the day of his first field trip — a hike in a local park. Sadly, he was returned a month a later. Buzz went on another field trip with a staff member last week. They went on a car ride that ended with a trip to Starbucks (second photo). Hopefully his second trip will have as much success! Meet Buzz here.

Rudey (third photo) went on a field trip 10 days ago. He spent his day splashing in the water and catching sticks in the waves. He was adopted an hour after he returned.

Charles Barkley (fourth photo) was a staff and volunteer favorite. He spent the day on the lake. He enjoyed snoozing in the sun on his own private island. Charles was adopted shortly after his field trip.

Lacey went on the Pooch Pontoon for a cruise on Lake Lanier (fifth photo). She went back to the volunteer’s home for a spa day after her cruise (sixth photo). Lacey was so relaxed from her day trip that she was adopted two days later.

Arizona Humane Society: Dog Field Trips/Short-Term Fostering Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The Arizona Humane Society (AHS) used the $500 grant to purchase 22 leashes, 11 collars, and 11 harnesses of various sizes to be used by homeless canines in need of additional behavior training through AHS’ Canine Sleepover Program. This donation from the Petfinder Foundation allowed AHS to underwrite the cost of program supplies needed to ensure sleepover hosts are prepared to care for their temporary canine residents.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

With the support provided from the Petfinder Foundation, AHS was able to purchase $500 worth of canine leashes, collars, and harnesses used for homeless dogs who participate in AHS’ new Canine Sleepover Program. Although COVID-19 placed a temporary pause on this program in March due to an increase in adoptions and a decrease in intake, AHS’ Behavior Team has a goal of supporting at least one canine per month. Once AHS’ shelter flow returns to pre-COVID-19 levels, the Canine Sleepover Program’s goal will return to the goal of eight canine participants per month. Thank you for supporting AHS’ Canine Sleepover Program and providing dogs in need of extra support with the opportunity to live happy and healthy lives!

How many pets did this grant help?

12

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Attached is a picture of Miracle, a 3-year-old female Labrador retriever mix who was rescued by the Arizona Humane Society (AHS) in late-August. Miracle was neglected by her previous owners, much like many of the canines AHS’ Emergency Animal Medical Technicians rescue from the field.

Sadly, the neglect Miracle endured had caused her to be fearful of humans and she lacked basic skills, such as walking on a leash. To prepare her to find her forever family, Miracle spent extra time with AHS’ Behavior Team to practice basic skills, introductions, and appropriate play behaviors.

Prior to COVID-19, Miracle would have been a prime candidate for the Canine Sleepover Program. Unfortunately, the pandemic had placed a temporary hold on this program, but AHS’ Behavior Team was able to used the supplies funded by the Petfinder Foundation to help Miracle learn to walk on a leash with a harness and safely build trust with people.

After only a short time with the Behavior Team, Miracle has become a new dog! Thanks to the Petfinder Foundation, Miracle was able to discover her confidence and AHS was able to teach her the basic skills adopters often look for. Miracle is officially ready to find her forever home thanks to the Petfinder Foundation and AHS’ Behavior Team!

Liberty Humane Society: Dog Field Trips/Short-Term Fostering Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

This grant allowed Liberty Humane Society to order custom vests which were $35 to produce, allowing us to order 14 in total. The new vests were added to our foster parent take-home packet and, since they are sturdy and of durable quality, they will be used on many dogs for years to come. During walks, the only way to spark up the conversation of adoption is through a dog’s “Adopt Me” vest.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

“Adopt Me” vests help us with exposure, which results in more adoptions. With the majority of our pets in foster care, it is very important for us to make sure the pets’ chances of getting adopted do not diminish, but rather, grow. A pet’s chance of adoption is greater when they are seen at the shelter, since we rely heavily on foot traffic. However, in spite of COVID-19, our adoptions were still successful. We attribute this success to the visibility that the “Adopt Me” vests provided.

How many pets did this grant help?

14 and ongoing

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Cerberus came to us as a stray. He was a very sweet dog, a little shy but ready to find a forever home. He would instantly show you his tummy for belly rubs. We knew he would be adopted quickly, but the barriers of Covid-19 made his stay a little longer than we wished. He entered our foster program and his foster parents showered us with photos of how great he was doing. Word spread like wildfire and he was adopted quickly, just like we had hoped for him in the beginning.
Sometimes all a dog needs is a little time in the spotlight.