Disaster Grant

Arabian Rescue Mission, Inc.: Disaster Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Repair barn due to hurricane damage

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This helped with rebuilding our damaged barn and gave us back 10 stalls for shelter for our horses.

How many pets did this grant help?

10

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

On June 26, 2019, a tornado hit our Kentucky farm, causing major damage to our back barn, the roof of the front barn, trailers, and fencing, and minor house damage. We had 10 stalls that needed an entire new roof, electric, and supports. Funds from this grant covered the deductible on the insurance policy and damages not covered by the insurance.

Juuri (the white horse pictured) was one of the horses housed in the barn that was damaged. He was adopted in December. Dan (the brown horse) was a horse whom we would not have been able to help had we not had all our stalls available. He came in November, spent the winter with us in his cozy stall at night and was adopted in February of this year.

Berkeley-East Bay Humane Society: Disaster Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The Kincade Fire broke out on Oct. 23, 2019, and burned 77,758 acres in Sonoma County, Calif., over the subsequent two weeks. There were widespread power outages and nearly 200,000 people were evacuated. Berkeley Humane transported 14 shelter animals from Marin Humane to our shelter in Berkeley to free up space in Marin for evacuated animals. The animals transported were 13 cats (Asha, Biscotti, Empress, Gordon, Huckleberry, Jasper, Julie, Marty McFly, Poppy, Prudence, Puff, Sierra, and Terra) and one dog (Chandler). These animals included a blind cat, a cat with an undetermined crystalized mass, multiple cats with skin conditions, and a dog with a mass, dental disease, and skin disease. By transporting these animals, we freed up space at Marin Humane for evacuated animals.

Seven of the cats and the dog were seniors and, as such, required more intensive care. Funding from the Petfinder Foundation was used to provide medical care and boarding for these pets until they were adopted. Fortunately, all pets have been adopted.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant provided vital resources to allow us to support Marin Humane as they were serving evacuees by providing boarding for their animals. This grant defrayed the costs of transporting 14 animals to our shelter, out of harm’s way from the Kincade Fire.

How many pets did this grant help?

14

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We didn’t know how long Chandler had been a stray before arriving at Marin Humane and then being transported to our hospital; all we knew was that this sweet senior dog had significant medical needs and needed a second chance at a new life — and we were determined to make that happen.

If you say any kind word to Chandler, his squinty smile takes over his entire face and you can’t help but smile back! He is an adorable big ball of love, but this sweet disposition masked his severe skin condition, advanced dental disease and, most concerning, a mass on his abdomen that required urgent surgery. Thanks to the Petfinder Foundation, Chandler received the surgeries he needed, and after he recovered, he was adopted by a loving family. They renamed him Churro, and report that he loves meeting new dogs and cuddling with his family.

Bunny World Foundation: Disaster Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

To cover medical bills of the rabbits who had to be evacuated during the Getty Fire, the Brush Fire, and the Tick Fire.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

In 2019, our holding area in Santa Clarita (which had 100+ rabbits inside) was evacuated, and many of our foster parents situated in Canyon Country and Brentwood were forced to flee. The grant helped cover medical bills for the injured rabbits, and those stressed out to the point of needing supportive care to recuperate from the evacuation ordeal. Some went into GI stasis; some developed pneumonia or respiratory issues and were treated for those. There were also lots of strays we picked up and rescued from the affected areas, as well many who have found themselves at the high-[intake] city shelters facing euthanasia.

How many pets did this grant help?

12

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Due to fires raging in the area, Augustina was one of many abandoned rabbits found with injuries from a possible attack by another animal. She was found suffering multiple putrid abscesses with rancid tissue deterioration and a build-up of congealed pus throughout. Her injuries had advanced to aggressive abscesses, causing infection to invade her fragile body. She seemed to have ALSO endured an ill-managed spay surgery while already undermined by preexisting infections. She was fighting for her new life, but her will was STRONG, and we were determined to rehabilitate her 100% and provide her all needed care and a bright, pain-free future. Thanks to BWF volunteers running hours-long rescue commutes for her, Augustina was evaluated, stabilized, and rushed to the emergency vet the same day she was rescued and, with the help of a Disaster Grant from the Petfinder Foundation, over the course of a few months, we were able to rehabilitate Augustina and see this youngster get all the love and care she’d been denied every second of her life.

Augustina, who had THREE infected holes in her abdomen when she was rescued, is not only 100% healed, but she also fell in love with Robin (third photo), who had troubles of his own, which also got treated during his post-rescue journey. They are both ADORABLE and STILL looking for that perfect home.

Augustina’s initial emergency treatment involved: Clipping fur and cleaning of all wounds; lancing of abscesses; warm compressing; and administering injectable Torbutrol, Baytril, Metacam, penicillin, and oral azithromycin. She was on three antibiotics, probiotics, pain meds, Critical Care mix, and a full array of holistic treatments: echinacea, colloidal silver, turmeric, coconut, and CBD oils. She’s received intensive daily wound flushing and lancing of abscesses with diluted chlorhexadine, followed by silver sulfadiazine topical antibiotic. Augustina remained on this protocol for one month with weekly re-checks. Despite her discomfort, Augustina remained grateful and loving, rewarding her foster mama with ample post-treatment kisses and pulling at the heartstrings like no other. This young child is the sweetest and most tolerant soul.

Thank you from the bottom of our bunny-loving hearts!

Meet Augustina on Petfinder.

Meet Augustina and Robin on Petfinder.

Meet Robin on Petfinder.

Friends For Life: Disaster Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

This grant provided transport, deworming, vaccinations and medical supplies to 20 cats and kittens rescued from Vidor, Texas, following Hurricane Imelda.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It allowed us to intake 20 cats beyond our capacity at the time, thus saving more lives.

How many pets did this grant help?

20

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

When the Vidor Animal Shelter was flooded during Hurrican Imelda earlier this year, Friends For Life took in 20 sick cats and kittens from the shelter. Eight of them are still waiting for their forever homes: Chadd (first photo), Bradd (second photo), Betty, Angelo, Phoebe, Delilah, Jet, and Meow Ming. Eleven of them have been adopted: Burt (third photo), Agnes (fourth photo), Jake (fifth photo), Belinda, Begonia, Angelica, Jordie, Claire, Miranda, Jewel, and Jermaine. One, Gerard, a 4-day old kitten, ultimately passed away.

These cats all received immediate medical care, vaccinations, and antibiotics.

Lee County Humane Society: Disaster Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

We used this grant to provide large outdoor kennels, dog houses, food and other supplies for families with pets that sustained damage to their homes and fences.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant allowed our organization to assist our community with their companion animals while they repaired their homes, mended their fences, and tried to bring their lives back to a normal state. We also were able to house animals for people who completely lost their homes to the storm while they relocated or rebuilt.

How many pets did this grant help?

35

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

A very sweet and scared orange kitty was picked out of the rubble after the F4 tornado screamed through Lee County and left the area devastated. He was healthy and handsome, although terrified, and brought to Lee County Humane Society in the hope that his owners would be able to find him. Fortunately, we had a very happy reunion just days later! His name is Tiger and his family was so very happy to have located him. Thanks to our Animal Control Officers and our resources provided through our Petfinder Foundation grant, we were able to care for Tiger until he was happily reunited with his family. We were also able to help so many families who had property damage by providing them with kennels, dog houses, food, and other supplies.

Capital Area Rescue Effort (CARE): Disaster Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

As a result of a record snowfall, the roofs on six of our outdoor play areas caved in under the weight of the snow. The play areas were unusable during periods of snow or rain. The grant was used to replace six 10 ft. x 10 ft. outdoor kennel covers with ones better able to withstand future snowfall.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

These covers provide the play areas with protection from snow, rain and sun so that our dogs receive outdoor exercise, play and enrichment.

How many pets did this grant help?

We rescue and place 250-270 dogs a year. A large portion of those dogs will use the outdoor play areas.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Miss Mary is a 3-year-old hound mix who has short legs and is low to the ground. She was surrendered to a shelter with her seven young puppies. We rescued Miss Mary and her pups and cared for the family until the puppies had received all of their shots. All of the puppies have been adopted and Miss Mary is waiting for the right family to come along that finds her as beautiful and sweet as we do. She spends her days now in one of our covered outdoor play areas. Meet Miss Mary here.

Jefferson County SPCA: Disaster Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

On January 12, 2019, during a particularly cold night when temperatures reached -5 degrees in Watertown, New York, a pipe burst in our main shelter location, which resulted in over four inches of water flooding the facility. As a result, the Jefferson County SPCA (JCSPCA) suffered major water-damage loss.

Fortunately, no animals were harmed directly by the flooding. However, the flood caused over $50,000 in damage. Although insurance will cover the majority of the structural and property loss, it will not cover the loss of income or payroll expenses during the closure. During the flood, we were closed for two weeks, leaving us with only our second location at Petco open, which has limited caging. In order to keep getting animals adopted from the main shelter, we had to have multiple staff members transport to Petco to showcase them for the day so they could get adopted. The grant monies paid for this to happen for two weeks. The great news is that we were still able to adopt 114 pets that month with the closure.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant was imperative, as being closed for two weeks made it almost impossible to do business and pay staff to care for the animals. This allowed us to care for animals and also pay staff to transport animals to our other shelter so they could be seen and adopted.

How many pets did this grant help?

114

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

The first picture is Rusty, a dog who was in a Long Island Shelter for almost two years. We transferred him up here to help try and get him adopted, but he wasn’t doing well with the transition. So when the flood occurred, I tried to get him out and into the public as much as possible. I brought him on TV and begged the community to help get him into a home (second photo). Staff kept bringing him to Petco to try and get him adopted.

Anyway, long story short, the contractor doing the repairs to the shelter was working I had Rusty and was doing a TV interview about the flood and had Rusty in the shot; then Rusty walked over and peed all over the contractor’s tools! I was devastated, but the contractor went home and told his wife what this dog had done and she said, “Oh my gosh, that’s the dog Heather was on TV with! He was marking his territory — it’s a sign we should adopt him!”

The next day they came in and met with Rusty and did a foster-to-adopt! Today, he’s gained 15 lbs., he’s super happy and a big couch potato (third photo), and he has two loving kids who give him all the attention in the world! So if it wasn’t for the extra exposure for Rusty, the wife wouldn’t have seen him and he may still be looking for a forever home! Thank you, Petfinder Foundation!

Butte Humane Society: Disaster Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The support we received was used for our Pet Pantry. The Camp Fire hit our community on Nov. 8, 2018, and raged for weeks. We started our Pet Food and Supply Pantry on the 9th. To date, we have helped more than 6,000 households and 18,000 animals who were impacted by the fire.

We also provided veterinary care for injured animals and are continuing to provide veterinary services for families displaced by the fire.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This support helped thousands of people in the immediate aftermath of the fire to be able to meet the immediate needs of their animals.

How many pets did this grant help?

More than 18,000

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

One of our goals during this crisis was to help people keep their animals so they wouldn’t have to surrender them. One story that stands out was a 67-year-old man named Garth. He and his wife had recently retired. He was a former roofer and construction manager. They retired and planned to live in Paradise and enjoy their retirement with their dog, Quincy. Then the fire happened, and Garth and his wife are now living with his former supervisor. Their dog was at the North Valley Animal Disaster Group shelter because his supervisor had a dog who wasn’t friendly to other dogs. Garth got a crate from us at no cost and started to cry because that meant he could get Quincy and have him stay with his wife and him.

Santa Maria Valley Humane Society: Disaster Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The Disaster Grant from the Petfinder Foundation was used to provide food, shelter, and veterinary care for dogs and cats who were evacuated as a result of the Woolsey Fire in November 2018. Because of the grant funds, Santa Maria Valley Humane Society was able to accept 77 animals from our partner shelters, making room for animals on the front lines of the disaster.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The Woolsey Fire was a destructive wildfire that burned in California’s Los Angeles and Ventura Counties. The fire ignited on Nov. 8, 2018, and burned 96,949 acres of land. The fire destroyed 1,643 structures, killed three people, and prompted the evacuation of more than 295,000 people.

When Central Coast communities of California are facing a disaster, animal shelters network to provide swift response to the demand to care for evacuated pets. Because of the grant funds, we were able to accept 77 dogs and cats who were already in-care at partner shelters to allow those shelters to accept evacuated pets. In turn, we were able to spay or neuter, vaccinate, and provide medical care to the transferred pets and find those animals homes.

How many pets did this grant help?

77

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Awesome follow-up stories from the Woolsey Fire evacuations (Nov. 13-30, 2018):
1. Say hello to Bella, formerly Luna (first photo)! Bella was transferred to Santa Maria Valley Humane Society in mid-November from Ventura County Animal Services so they could make room for animals being evacuated due to the Woolsey Fire. Bella had a short three-day stay with us before she found her new family. Now, a few months after being in her new home, this is what her family has to say:

“Bella has been settling in wonderfully! We’ve been on many adventures together, including enjoying the ocean at Avila Dog Beach, hiking on the Bob Jones Trail, socializing at Woof Pac Park, and many more. We even entered her in Santa’s Doggie Parade in Avila before Christmas! Bella didn’t win, but she looked beautiful in her festive collar. She loves waking up and giving us morning kisses every day. We can’t imagine our life without Bella!”

2. Harley, formerly Harvey Dent (second photo), a 3-year-old pit bull, was an owner-surrender to Santa Barbara County Animal Services. After not being able to find a home for three months, Harley was transferred to Santa Maria Valley Humane Society due to the Woolsey Fire evacuations. Within two weeks, Harley found his match! Now, a month later, this is what his new family has to say:

“I’ve been having the time of my life with Harley. He’s been the best pup; he’s sweet, affectionate, athletic, mellow, polite, loving of all people and other dogs, and a ton of fun. I live alone and work from home so I wanted a buddy I could hang out with all the time and I couldn’t have asked for a better partner in crime. Previously, I was living with and taking care of my mother, who was sick and passed away eight months ago, so it has been a very hard season of life for me, but having Harley has brought me so much joy and comfort. I’m so thankful I found Harley when I did, and I may have needed him even more than he needed me. He’s such a light in my life.

“We go for tons of walks, hikes, doggie playdates, runs, dog beach outings, and he’s becoming a local celebrity in downtown San Luis Obispo because he’s so sweet and handsome. I’m extremely thankful to SMVHS for all you do to give pups good homes, and I hope my story brings you joy. Very grateful for your team and for my boy, Harley!”

3. Meet Dexter, formerly Deputy (third photo)! Dexter was an owner-surrender to Santa Barbara County Animal Services and he was later transferred to Santa Maria Valley Humane Society to make room for evacuated animals. Combined, he spent nearly six months searching for his perfect match, but they finally came for him! Now, several months later, this is what his family has to say: “It’s as if Deputy was in our family for years after a day in our house. He sits in the recliner with us every time we get in it.

“We renamed him Dexter, as my wife had a dream we named a pound dog Dexter the night before I picked him up. Funny part was, it was a surprise to my wife that I was adopting him. Bottom line: He is a great addition to our family and a great companion for our other dog.”

The LAST animal in our shelter relocated from the Woolsey Fire evacuations is a a cat named Esperanza (fourth photo). From her Petfinder profile: “Esperanza, our diva cat, is sweet and sour. She is very independent and does not require much attention. For the most part, Esperanza just likes to do her own thing. Some of the things she enjoys are long naps, big fluffy bedding, catnip, and wet food and feather toys. Boy does she like her wet food. Esperanza is one of the chubbiest kitties that we have. When she plays, she will waddle across her room and stand on her hind legs to catch the toy. It is definitely a sight to see. Come out and meet this big sassy kitty. Maybe she can have some catnip so you can really see how funny she can get.” You can meet her here.

Surfcat Cafe and Adoptions: Disaster Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Medical bills and home care for burns from the Woolsey Fire

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant made it possible for Surfcat to provide a safe haven for and treat cats belonging to those who had lost everything in the fire. We also still have three unclaimed fire monkeys whom we are caring for until we can find them forever homes. Being able to help these fire kitties has made Surfcat a household name in our community. We are so grateful for your help.

How many pets did this grant help?

At this point we have helped 10 cats recover from this fire and we are still helping to find and reunite Woolsey Fire cats today.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Saucy was one of many cats left behind as the massive flames raged closer. It was over a week after the fire before authorities allowed us up to search for survivors. We found more than 50 deceased cats at this particular property nestled in the rolling hills of Malibu California. Saucy was found hiding inside a lamppost with third-degree burns on her paws, face, legs and head. Search and rescue rushed her out of the burn zone and met us at the closest veterinary E.R., where she was placed on oxygen and given some time to adjust (first photo). About a week later, Surfcat was able to bring Saucy home. She is now looking for her forever home (second photo).

She has no interest in going past the front door. Soft cozy blankets are her thing now. She loves to play with people way better then cats, although it would be nice for her to stay together with her pal Koda. If you love purrs, toys and laps, then she’s your gal! Meet Saucy here.

Koda was rescued by Animal Control and brought to Little Angels Project, a nonprofit animal clinic located nearby the fire zone. He too had burns over his face, head, and feet (third photo). He spent about a month in treatment before being transferred to Surfcat to continue home-care. Koda is still undergoing medical care on his feet and is looking for his forever home (fourth photo). He’s still a bit nervous but he loves to be loved on and play with humans and fellow felines. Meet Koda here.

Albert (fifth photo) was pulled from the rubble the same day Saucy was and taken to the same E.R. After he was released, we realized that he had an infection in one of his paws (sixth photo). After being transferred to Little Angels and spending an additional month in critical care, Albert came home to Surfcat. He is still undergoing foot treatments and will be available for adoption soon.