Disaster Grant

10th Life Surgical Center dba A DOGGIE 4 YOU: Disaster Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The $2,000 Disaster Grant money was used to replace water-damaged dry food supplies ($1,442.87) and pay higher utility bills resulting from power-grid failure ($557.13).

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The $2,000 Disaster Grant helped to recover the loss of food to keep the rescued dogs healthy. The utility bills helped to keep the heat on during the winter once the energy issues were corrected.

How many pets did this grant help?

172 dogs

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Wally, the escape artist, as he has been known by A Doggie 4 You staff, was a long-term resident at the rescue. We are sure that escaping his yard is how Wally came to be separated from his former home.

When Wally first came to A Doggie 4 You, we were unaware of his past life and placed him in a normal kennel. Much to our surprise, he quickly shimmied up and over the six-foot chain-link outdoor kennel. Next, we thought we would outsmart Wally and put a covering over the top of his kennel. But no, we were wrong. Wally has a unique talent for finding a way to squeeze his body out of any confined area!

One day while construction was going on at the rescue, a potential adopter drove up and saw Wally sitting loose close to a pickup truck just outside the kennels. She assumed that he belonged to one of the construction workers. When she mentioned the dog to the rescue staff, she was told, “Don’t worry, that’s just Wally, our escape artist. He’s perfectly happy. We will put him up later.”

Thankfully, Wally’s long tenure at the rescue recently ended when he was adopted. We were so happy for him and his forever family. The family was made very aware of his Houdini escape-artist tricks! So far, so good, as Wally has not returned to the rescue on his own nor by his adopters.

Texas Best Choices Animal Rescue: Disaster Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The Texas storm hit us hard and we had unexpected expenses that the $2,500 Disaster Grant funds were used for:

Heat lamps
Propane heaters
Electric heaters
Propane gas to run the heaters
Extreme electric bill
Kennel supplies — Water jugs to go get water when the water was cut off in our area, buckets to distribute the water, blankets, straw.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant was extremely beneficial for us to meet the extra expenses required due to the storm. We in Texas have never experienced this type of cold weather and your generosity helped us keep the animals warm and meet their basic needs despite the conditions. Rolling power outages and no water were devastating, but propane heaters, propane gas, jugs, and buckets provided just what was needed. Blankets, too, were much appreciated!

How many pets did this grant help?

66 dogs and puppies

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Luna came to us from her owner, who was threatening to dump her in the lake if we did not take her. She had no hair and was suffering with extreme mange, but she did not deserve to die. The first photo is her intake photo. We began medicating her, but when the cold weather hit, she was especially vulnerable. She not only thrived, but grew her hair back and found a very special forever home (third photo)! Thank you for your generosity! You made a difference in so many lives!

Jackson (fourth photo) was also a resident during these tough times. Every dog at the rescue benefitted from your support, but we share Jackson’s story because he also got a forever home thanks to Petfinder!

Palm Valley Animal Society: Disaster Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The funding was for disaster relief from Winter Storm Uri. The funding covered repair of our AC compressor that blew when generators came on and off several times as we gained and lost power.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Funding had to be diverted away from our animal care operations in order to cover the cost of repair for our AC compressor. Having the Petfinder Foundation come back and cover the cost of this unexpected expense means that we won’t have any interruption in our capacity to care for animals in our facilities.

How many pets did this grant help?

550, which is the average daily population count of animals in our shelter

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Space is a Great Dane who is deaf and was rescued off the streets in the days leading up to Winter Storm Uri. He was undernourished and skinny. Thankfully, as it got colder, we had a few XXL dog sweaters that he was able to use to stay warm. As we battled the cold and the failure of our equipment, a partner shelter in Minnesota heard about Space and immediately snatched him up for rescue. He left our care just a few days after the storm and is living happily in Minnesota now!

Houston Humane Society: Disaster Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Due to damage sustained to the shelter from the winter storm, many repairs were required, including replacing the well pump and water filter, copper pipes in the kennels, and two new batteries for the generators. The Petfinder Foundation grant funds were used to reimburse HHS for these repairs.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant enabled us to replenish the accounts that we used to pay for the upfront costs of damage repairs. This meant that we could use that money on the care of the animals instead.

How many pets did this grant help?

300

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

The Houston Humane Society rescued eight dogs and one adult pig from the deadly temperatures during last month’s winter freeze. The dogs were discovered after a report was made to the Harris County Animal Cruelty Taskforce by a concerned citizen. The officers on-scene from the Harris County Sheriff’s Office and Harris County Pets, partners of the Harris County Animal Cruelty Taskforce, shared that the animals appeared to have been left outside with no shelter, food, or water access during the storm, during which temperatures reached a horrifying 18 degrees.

The youngest victim, a puppy, was found barely alive, covered in ice, and suffering from a broken jaw, clearly the result of abuse. The puppy, now named Arctic (first three photos), received specialized surgery to repair her injuries. She remains in stable condition. We are happy to share that our strong girl Arctic will now begin her long road to recovery with her head held up high. She has refused the feeding tube that veterinarians thought she would need, and instead prefers her food wet and in a bowl!

Like many Texans, Arctic is resilient and a true example of how Texans progress toward recovery: proud and tough. Arctic is a sweet girl who, despite the stitches, loves to give wet kisses and will attempt to hug you when held. She is sure to have that tail wagging, begging for attention when you come near. The rest of the pups and pig remain under medical review and are adjusting well to volunteers and staff. All enjoy treats and playtime. The pig especially enjoys fresh strawberries.

NaNook & NaKoda's Big Paw Rescue: Disaster Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The 2021 Disaster Grant money was used to purchase two generators and replace an a/c wall unit that was damaged when the power outage occurred.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant allowed us to purchase two generators to run our buildings’ electricity so that the dogs will not be without heat or air conditioning, lights, refrigeration of medications, foods, etc., again. During the last storm, power was knocked out in our area for three days. For three days, our founder dogpiled with all the dogs in our rescue in one room in between outside time to keep them warm.

How many pets did this grant help?

24

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Four days before the Texas storm hit, four puppies (first four photos) were dumped about 20 miles outside of our rural town. We took these babies in and named them Cupid, Teddy, Paddy, and Nora. They were scared and timid and cold. It was difficult to get them to pile up with the other dogs and our founder, but she struggled through and kept these four and all the other dogs warm. Now, if a storm or other disaster ever knocks the power out again, the dogs will be warm or cool in their own spaces without such a struggle to pile up. Food and meds that are refrigerated will be safe.

Sanctuary One: Disaster Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Funds were used for spay and neuter surgeries, vaccinations/boosters, heartworm tests, and food for all dogs taken in from the county shelter during the local wildfire, as well as special diagnostic vet care for two senior dogs.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Typically, due to funding limitations, we do not do direct intake with animals who are not spayed/neutered. The dogs taken in from the county shelter required more medical care than we had budgeted for the year (and regular resources were directed to our being able to go into the fire zones with the county sheriff to rescue over 60 animals). This grant allowed us to care for the county dogs; they have all been adopted.

How many pets did this grant help?

5

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Goldie was a senior pup who needed to be spayed and receive a complete medical review. She had knowledge of training, but either had been a stray for a while or had simply not received medical attention in her previous home. After her medical care was given and she found her new foundation with consistent food, love, and care, she flourished.

From her adopter: “Goldie is doing so great! We go on walks every day and she loves going on drives with me. We’ve been hiking every weekend and having so much fun. She’s not a huge fan of all the noises of the city, but is getting used to them. She’s found her spot on my bed and I just love her so much.”

Big Sky Ranch/CATNIP Foundation: Disaster Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Funds from this grant helped us to continue to meet the overwhelming medical needs of animals in this region in an unprecedented climate of multi-tiered devastation brought on by multiple hurricanes in the same area, on top of one of the hardest-hit COVID-stricken areas, in an already impoverished region. With a desperate shortage of options for sick, injured, and surrendered pets, and an overwhelming number of animals needing homes, it became more critical than ever to utilized our transport partners and get animals out to adopters in other parts of the country. These dollars helped us do just that.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We are known for our roles in emergency response, but the situation created by these multiple disasters was very different from responding to singular disasters like hurricanes Michael or Harvey. We were functioning as a de facto emergency room for animals all over the state, and from Texas to Mississippi, as well as one of the very few intake resources for cats. The opportunity for alternative, positive outcomes for these animals was almost non-existent. This grant helped us fund the medical care and expenses associated with that care, as well as additional transport that not only allowed more pets to get out of Louisiana and on to new homes, but also created space for new intake.

How many pets did this grant help?

64

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Many cats and kittens were rescued from the aftermath of Hurricane Laura, but one little kitten’s journey certainly stands out. In the two short months of Chafaye’s life, she experienced more than most kitties do in a lifetime, even when they use all nine lives!

Chafaye was rescued one dark, rainy night, in the middle of an 18-mile stretch of bridge over the Achafalaya swamp, by a good Samaritan on his way back to Lake Charles from our clinic, where he sadly had to say a heartbreaking goodbye to one of his older kitties.

It was a miracle that he saw her, and that she had not been hit by all the cars and trucks speeding by. He immediately took the sick, soaked and terrified kitten into his lap and warmed her, brought her home and for the next few days, cared for her, syringe-fed her and helped her regain her strength.

Then came the news of Hurricane Laura heading straight for them as a Category 5. He did everything he could to secure his small trailer and create a safe space for himself and his cats to ride out the storm. The next 24 hours were sheer terror, as everything around his humble home was devastated. Amazingly, his carpentry skills paid off, and in the wee hours after the storm had passed, he quickly learned that it was only his trailer left standing for as far as the eye could see.

It was another miracle for this tiny kitten, but the stress and lack of food and water had taken its toll on her tiny, already-depleted little body. As soon as we could get through the tree-covered roads, we made our way to his place in DeQuincy, LA, one of the hardest-hit areas, and brought little Chafaye, and dozens of other cats and kittens in need, back to Big Sky.

Once again, Chafaye was in need of critical care. Sick and dehydrated, she spent the next two weeks receiving critical medical treatment, and as she got stronger and healthier, her personality blossomed. She was one of the sweetest kittens at the ranch.

We worked with our transport partners, and with the help of this grant, Chafaye once again boarded our van with several other kitties from the same location to make her longest trip yet: 1,500 miles to the Northeast, where she quickly found her forever home — before we even returned home!

What a long journey in such a short life, but what a happy destination — and thanks to the Petfinder Foundation for making that last, so very important, leg possible!

Animal Aid for Vermilion Area: Disaster Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

We received this grant shortly after Hurricane Laura. Southern Louisiana, particularly southwest Vermilion parish, was decimated by the hurricane, causing many families and pets to become homeless. Vermilion Parish Rabies Animal Control, the shelter we work with which has no adoption/rescue program (all animals go through us), was flooded with phone calls regarding stray and abandoned animals. The shelter was already overcrowded, with nowhere to put the newly homeless animals.

Hurricane Laura hit south Louisiana on Aug. 29, 2020. From Aug. 28 to Sept. 30, Vermilion Parish Animal Control picked up 80 dogs and 35 cats. This grant allowed us to fund the medical requirements of transporting agencies to move out those pets that had been in the shelter for a long time to make room for the new guys.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We were able to get many dogs the vaccinations and health certificates required for travel to other states.

How many pets did this grant help?

100

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

On Sept. 14, 2020, 24 long-term shelter residents boarded a Wings of Rescue flight to San Diego. Some of the dogs had been in the shelter for over a year with very little interest from adopters or other rescues. All of the dogs were heartworm-positive with bully facial features. Because of this grant, we were able to give all of the dogs the vetting required to make the flight. At last check-in with the rescue, all but one dog had been adopted.

One particular pet that this helped was Peter. Peter arrived in January 2020 emaciated, terrified, and heartworm-positive (first photo). He was scared of the environment and didn’t show potential adopters or rescues what volunteers could see was hiding inside. During his long stint at Animal Control, Peter accumulated nearly $1,000 in vet bills due to heartworm complications, further lessening his appeal to potential rescues and adopters. In flies Wings of Rescue, which coordinated with San Diego Humane Society to save not just Peter, but many other heartworm-positive, bully-looking dogs. Peter has been treated for his heartworms in California but unfortunately is still looking for his forever home. The change of scenery has allowed Peter to show his true personality (second photo).

Siskiyou Humane Society: Disaster Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Costs associated with animal rescue during the Slater Fire in California. Pet food and animal supplies for pet owners who lost their homes in their fire.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant helped to provide extra food and supplies for the animals displaced by the fire and helped cover expenses to send a team out for boots-on-the-ground rescue.

How many pets did this grant help?

More than 100

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We received many cats from the Slater Fire after no one had claimed them. Buck (first photo) was my favorite; he was a beautiful manx kitten. All the cats have been adopted.

Exotic Bird Rescue of Oregon: Disaster Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The Exotic Bird Rescue of Oregon (EBR) is deeply grateful to the Petfinder Foundation for your support during the intense fire season we experienced this year. We used the full amount of your grant to conduct medical exams for three of the parrots we took in as a result of their families being evacuated from the wildfires.

Isabella, a 21-year-old green-wing macaw, was treated with medications for an infection. Butch (sixth photo), a 41-year-old African grey, had a basic health check and was converted to a better diet. Triton, a 17-year-old sulfur-crested cockatoo who is a severe plucker, was prescribed medication, anti-plucking collars, and a Kevlar anti-plucking vest. All three of these birds are still with EBR while their families recover from the devastation of the wildfires we experienced.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant ensured that EBR was able to immediately serve and care for parrots and their families after fire evacuation. Because the grant was able to support the medical costs of these birds post-fire, EBR was able to use other funds raised from individuals to assist with food and toys for these birds. Moreover, because of the support from the Petfinder Foundation and these individual donors during the fires, EBR was able to keep sheltering current foster parrots in their homes and coordinating temporary housing for several current foster parrots who needed to evacuate from the fires or heavy smoke.

How many pets did this grant help?

7

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Triton (first photo), Isabella (second photo), and Zach (with Isabella in the third photo and another foster bird in the fourth photo) are parrots who all belong to a family that evacuated during the severe wildfires we had this fall. They were brought to EBR to be cared for while the family sheltered to wait out the fires. Upon returning to their home, they discovered that the home had burned. (The fifth photo shows the fire aftermath, with the surviving metal cages surrounded by burned rubble.)

The family is relieved and glad that their birds are safe with us until they can rebuild their home and create a safe space for them again. As much as EBR loves these birds too, we can’t wait for them to finally be reunited with their family!