Disaster Grant

Capital Area Rescue Effort (CARE): Disaster Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

As a result of a record snowfall, the roofs on six of our outdoor play areas caved in under the weight of the snow. The play areas were unusable during periods of snow or rain. The grant was used to replace six 10 ft. x 10 ft. outdoor kennel covers with ones better able to withstand future snowfall.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

These covers provide the play areas with protection from snow, rain and sun so that our dogs receive outdoor exercise, play and enrichment.

How many pets did this grant help?

We rescue and place 250-270 dogs a year. A large portion of those dogs will use the outdoor play areas.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Miss Mary is a 3-year-old hound mix who has short legs and is low to the ground. She was surrendered to a shelter with her seven young puppies. We rescued Miss Mary and her pups and cared for the family until the puppies had received all of their shots. All of the puppies have been adopted and Miss Mary is waiting for the right family to come along that finds her as beautiful and sweet as we do. She spends her days now in one of our covered outdoor play areas. Meet Miss Mary here.

Jefferson County SPCA: Disaster Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

On January 12, 2019, during a particularly cold night when temperatures reached -5 degrees in Watertown, New York, a pipe burst in our main shelter location, which resulted in over four inches of water flooding the facility. As a result, the Jefferson County SPCA (JCSPCA) suffered major water-damage loss.

Fortunately, no animals were harmed directly by the flooding. However, the flood caused over $50,000 in damage. Although insurance will cover the majority of the structural and property loss, it will not cover the loss of income or payroll expenses during the closure. During the flood, we were closed for two weeks, leaving us with only our second location at Petco open, which has limited caging. In order to keep getting animals adopted from the main shelter, we had to have multiple staff members transport to Petco to showcase them for the day so they could get adopted. The grant monies paid for this to happen for two weeks. The great news is that we were still able to adopt 114 pets that month with the closure.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant was imperative, as being closed for two weeks made it almost impossible to do business and pay staff to care for the animals. This allowed us to care for animals and also pay staff to transport animals to our other shelter so they could be seen and adopted.

How many pets did this grant help?

114

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

The first picture is Rusty, a dog who was in a Long Island Shelter for almost two years. We transferred him up here to help try and get him adopted, but he wasn’t doing well with the transition. So when the flood occurred, I tried to get him out and into the public as much as possible. I brought him on TV and begged the community to help get him into a home (second photo). Staff kept bringing him to Petco to try and get him adopted.

Anyway, long story short, the contractor doing the repairs to the shelter was working I had Rusty and was doing a TV interview about the flood and had Rusty in the shot; then Rusty walked over and peed all over the contractor’s tools! I was devastated, but the contractor went home and told his wife what this dog had done and she said, “Oh my gosh, that’s the dog Heather was on TV with! He was marking his territory — it’s a sign we should adopt him!”

The next day they came in and met with Rusty and did a foster-to-adopt! Today, he’s gained 15 lbs., he’s super happy and a big couch potato (third photo), and he has two loving kids who give him all the attention in the world! So if it wasn’t for the extra exposure for Rusty, the wife wouldn’t have seen him and he may still be looking for a forever home! Thank you, Petfinder Foundation!

Butte Humane Society: Disaster Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The support we received was used for our Pet Pantry. The Camp Fire hit our community on Nov. 8, 2018, and raged for weeks. We started our Pet Food and Supply Pantry on the 9th. To date, we have helped more than 6,000 households and 18,000 animals who were impacted by the fire.

We also provided veterinary care for injured animals and are continuing to provide veterinary services for families displaced by the fire.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This support helped thousands of people in the immediate aftermath of the fire to be able to meet the immediate needs of their animals.

How many pets did this grant help?

More than 18,000

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

One of our goals during this crisis was to help people keep their animals so they wouldn’t have to surrender them. One story that stands out was a 67-year-old man named Garth. He and his wife had recently retired. He was a former roofer and construction manager. They retired and planned to live in Paradise and enjoy their retirement with their dog, Quincy. Then the fire happened, and Garth and his wife are now living with his former supervisor. Their dog was at the North Valley Animal Disaster Group shelter because his supervisor had a dog who wasn’t friendly to other dogs. Garth got a crate from us at no cost and started to cry because that meant he could get Quincy and have him stay with his wife and him.

Santa Maria Valley Humane Society: Disaster Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The Disaster Grant from the Petfinder Foundation was used to provide food, shelter, and veterinary care for dogs and cats who were evacuated as a result of the Woolsey Fire in November 2018. Because of the grant funds, Santa Maria Valley Humane Society was able to accept 77 animals from our partner shelters, making room for animals on the front lines of the disaster.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The Woolsey Fire was a destructive wildfire that burned in California’s Los Angeles and Ventura Counties. The fire ignited on Nov. 8, 2018, and burned 96,949 acres of land. The fire destroyed 1,643 structures, killed three people, and prompted the evacuation of more than 295,000 people.

When Central Coast communities of California are facing a disaster, animal shelters network to provide swift response to the demand to care for evacuated pets. Because of the grant funds, we were able to accept 77 dogs and cats who were already in-care at partner shelters to allow those shelters to accept evacuated pets. In turn, we were able to spay or neuter, vaccinate, and provide medical care to the transferred pets and find those animals homes.

How many pets did this grant help?

77

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Awesome follow-up stories from the Woolsey Fire evacuations (Nov. 13-30, 2018):
1. Say hello to Bella, formerly Luna (first photo)! Bella was transferred to Santa Maria Valley Humane Society in mid-November from Ventura County Animal Services so they could make room for animals being evacuated due to the Woolsey Fire. Bella had a short three-day stay with us before she found her new family. Now, a few months after being in her new home, this is what her family has to say:

“Bella has been settling in wonderfully! We’ve been on many adventures together, including enjoying the ocean at Avila Dog Beach, hiking on the Bob Jones Trail, socializing at Woof Pac Park, and many more. We even entered her in Santa’s Doggie Parade in Avila before Christmas! Bella didn’t win, but she looked beautiful in her festive collar. She loves waking up and giving us morning kisses every day. We can’t imagine our life without Bella!”

2. Harley, formerly Harvey Dent (second photo), a 3-year-old pit bull, was an owner-surrender to Santa Barbara County Animal Services. After not being able to find a home for three months, Harley was transferred to Santa Maria Valley Humane Society due to the Woolsey Fire evacuations. Within two weeks, Harley found his match! Now, a month later, this is what his new family has to say:

“I’ve been having the time of my life with Harley. He’s been the best pup; he’s sweet, affectionate, athletic, mellow, polite, loving of all people and other dogs, and a ton of fun. I live alone and work from home so I wanted a buddy I could hang out with all the time and I couldn’t have asked for a better partner in crime. Previously, I was living with and taking care of my mother, who was sick and passed away eight months ago, so it has been a very hard season of life for me, but having Harley has brought me so much joy and comfort. I’m so thankful I found Harley when I did, and I may have needed him even more than he needed me. He’s such a light in my life.

“We go for tons of walks, hikes, doggie playdates, runs, dog beach outings, and he’s becoming a local celebrity in downtown San Luis Obispo because he’s so sweet and handsome. I’m extremely thankful to SMVHS for all you do to give pups good homes, and I hope my story brings you joy. Very grateful for your team and for my boy, Harley!”

3. Meet Dexter, formerly Deputy (third photo)! Dexter was an owner-surrender to Santa Barbara County Animal Services and he was later transferred to Santa Maria Valley Humane Society to make room for evacuated animals. Combined, he spent nearly six months searching for his perfect match, but they finally came for him! Now, several months later, this is what his family has to say: “It’s as if Deputy was in our family for years after a day in our house. He sits in the recliner with us every time we get in it.

“We renamed him Dexter, as my wife had a dream we named a pound dog Dexter the night before I picked him up. Funny part was, it was a surprise to my wife that I was adopting him. Bottom line: He is a great addition to our family and a great companion for our other dog.”

The LAST animal in our shelter relocated from the Woolsey Fire evacuations is a a cat named Esperanza (fourth photo). From her Petfinder profile: “Esperanza, our diva cat, is sweet and sour. She is very independent and does not require much attention. For the most part, Esperanza just likes to do her own thing. Some of the things she enjoys are long naps, big fluffy bedding, catnip, and wet food and feather toys. Boy does she like her wet food. Esperanza is one of the chubbiest kitties that we have. When she plays, she will waddle across her room and stand on her hind legs to catch the toy. It is definitely a sight to see. Come out and meet this big sassy kitty. Maybe she can have some catnip so you can really see how funny she can get.” You can meet her here.

Surfcat Cafe and Adoptions: Disaster Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Medical bills and home care for burns from the Woolsey Fire

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant made it possible for Surfcat to provide a safe haven for and treat cats belonging to those who had lost everything in the fire. We also still have three unclaimed fire monkeys whom we are caring for until we can find them forever homes. Being able to help these fire kitties has made Surfcat a household name in our community. We are so grateful for your help.

How many pets did this grant help?

At this point we have helped 10 cats recover from this fire and we are still helping to find and reunite Woolsey Fire cats today.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Saucy was one of many cats left behind as the massive flames raged closer. It was over a week after the fire before authorities allowed us up to search for survivors. We found more than 50 deceased cats at this particular property nestled in the rolling hills of Malibu California. Saucy was found hiding inside a lamppost with third-degree burns on her paws, face, legs and head. Search and rescue rushed her out of the burn zone and met us at the closest veterinary E.R., where she was placed on oxygen and given some time to adjust (first photo). About a week later, Surfcat was able to bring Saucy home. She is now looking for her forever home (second photo).

She has no interest in going past the front door. Soft cozy blankets are her thing now. She loves to play with people way better then cats, although it would be nice for her to stay together with her pal Koda. If you love purrs, toys and laps, then she’s your gal! Meet Saucy here.

Koda was rescued by Animal Control and brought to Little Angels Project, a nonprofit animal clinic located nearby the fire zone. He too had burns over his face, head, and feet (third photo). He spent about a month in treatment before being transferred to Surfcat to continue home-care. Koda is still undergoing medical care on his feet and is looking for his forever home (fourth photo). He’s still a bit nervous but he loves to be loved on and play with humans and fellow felines. Meet Koda here.

Albert (fifth photo) was pulled from the rubble the same day Saucy was and taken to the same E.R. After he was released, we realized that he had an infection in one of his paws (sixth photo). After being transferred to Little Angels and spending an additional month in critical care, Albert came home to Surfcat. He is still undergoing foot treatments and will be available for adoption soon.

Brother Wolf Animal Rescue: Disaster Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

This generous grant from the Petfinder Foundation supported medical care for animals rescued during our disaster-relief efforts following Hurricane Florence.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Disaster relief work is some of the most expensive work we do, but also critical to saving lives. When animals are rescued from floodwaters like what we saw after Hurricane Florence and brought into our care, they often require urgent care as they heal from injuries and illnesses.

Grants like this allow us to act quickly to save these vulnerable lives.

How many pets did this grant help?

33

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Ahead of Hurricane Florence, we organized several transports of animals out of coastal areas that were expected to be hit the hardest to partnered shelters in the northeast. Each of these transports stopped at our Adoption Center in Asheville, N.C., to be loaded onto another van and to give the dogs time to stretch their legs.

During one of these transports, we met a dog named Hutch, who had obviously been neglected in his previous shelter. Even though he had been with them for months, he was severely underweight, with his ribs and hip bones sticking out, and had a large amount of parasites in his frail body.

We could see right away that he needed immediate care, so we pulled him off transport and rushed him into our medical room. After an exam, fluids, a dose of dewormer, and a generous meal, we placed him into a loving foster home.

In November, after being in our care for just over two months, he had gained 22 lbs. and had turned into a happy, healthy puppy!

In early December, Hutch was adopted by a terrific family who will love and spoil him for the rest of his life. Thanks for helping us give Hutch the life he deserves!

Peak Lab Rescue: Disaster Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Care of dogs rescued as the result of Hurricane Florence.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Peak Lab Rescue pulled 48 dogs in advance of Hurricane Florence as shelters were cleared in the projected impact area. An additional 71 dogs were pulled after the hurricane from partner shelters in eight affected counties. This brought the total number of dogs saved from the disaster by Peak Lab Rescue to 119.

Of the 119 dogs saved, 101 have been adopted. Fifteen were transferred to other rescue groups. Two were reclaimed by their owners. One was humanely euthanized as the result of a ruptured cranial malignancy and multiple other health issues.

The total cost of care for dogs rescued from Hurricane Florence by Peak Lab Rescue was $37,875, with a net cost to the rescue (after the collection of adoption fees) of $10,100. Special thanks to the Petfinder Foundation for a Disaster Relief Grant in the amount of $2,500 to help offset this unplanned expense.

How many pets did this grant help?

119

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Six-week-old Phelps was plucked by a good Samaritan from the rushing floodwaters in Duplin County, North Carolina, after Hurricane Florence. Shivering and dehydrated, he arrived at the county’s pet-friendly evacuation center just as a Peak Lab Rescue volunteer was delivering a truckload of donations. Without immediate veterinary care, it was obvious that Phelps would not survive the night.

Baby Phelps clearly isn’t a Labrador retriever. But without hesitation, he was accepted by Peak Lab Rescue and provided with warm IV fluids and a full veterinary exam. Once stabilized, Phelps moved to the home of a foster family, who report that he was “shaking like a leaf and didn’t want to be out of someone’s arms.” The frightened little guy quickly became comfortable and made himself right at home.

Exactly two weeks later, Phelps was adopted by a loving family who have another small dog to keep him company. He is an “honorary” Lab and will live happily ever after thanks to a Disaster Relief Grant from the Petfinder Foundation.

JerseyGirls Animal Rescue: Disaster Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Spay/neuter, routine vet care, transport, and miscellaneous expenses

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We received a $1,000 grant, which enabled us to rescue more dogs after the hurricane passed.

How many pets did this grant help?

5+

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Celia was an owner surrender shortly before Hurricane Florence hit North Carolina in September 2018. We rescued her just before the storm and had her taken to the vet for routine care prior to transport (with little time to spare). Because she had some skin issues, the vet was unable to spay her prior to transport, but was able to vaccinate her and give her medication for the skin issues.

I, personally, picked her up from transport when she arrived in New Jersey and I cried when I saw her. This beautiful girl with such great potential looked horrendous — she had many areas of her body that were bald, she was filthy, and she looked like she’d never had a bath in her life, yet she was as sweet as could be and greeted us with kisses. She went to a foster home where she received tremendous amounts of love and TLC, medication, and rubs with coconut oil to heal her skin and fur. In less than three months, Celia has transformed into the stunning girl we expected her to be, and she is absolutely gorgeous!

We didn’t rush an adoption for her because we wanted to get her skin issues under control first. She has since been spayed, fully vaccinated, had most of her fur grow back, and she has gotten rid of the intestinal worms she arrived with. She is in fantastic condition and, just this past weekend (Dec. 9, 2018), met her forever family. She will go home to them just after the new year and she will live in a beautiful brownstone in Brooklyn, N.Y., with a huge park just around the corner and a back yard (in Brooklyn!) where she can run and play. She will also have two children to love, both of whom hope to have her sleep in their bed, so an abundance of love is in her near future, as well as a life filled with hikes in the country at the family’s country home on weekends.

NOTE: We have MANY other pictures of Celia from when she had many bald patches to her meeting with her forever family. Please let me know if I can email them to you to include with her story. The transformation of this dog has been incredible!

Humane Society for Inland Mendocino County: Disaster Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The Petfinder Foundation grant funds dispersed to our facility enabled us to provide shelter and medical care to 24 animals evacuated from their homes due to the Ranch Fire.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We were able to give pet owners spay/neuter services, vaccinations, testing, microchips and emergency medical care for animals we took in that were in need.

How many pets did this grant help?

Dogs: 11; cats: 13

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Runt, a cat (first photo), was found in the Blue Lake area, not far from what was her home. We provided medical care for the burned tops of her ears, her burned feet and serious respiratory problems due to smoke inhalation. Her owner walked into the burn area to rescue her and bring her to us. He also brought us seven other cats he was caring for at the time of the fire.

Bonnie (second photo), a pit bull terrier, came to us from the Upper Lake area, where she and her family lost their home to the Ranch Fire. Her family had rescued her from a life on the streets just six months prior. They are still working through the obstacles and aftermath of the fires and we hope to see all of them reunited soon. We continue to provide food, shelter and medical care for Bonnie.

Arabian Rescue Mission, Inc.: Disaster Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Lumber and contractor to rebuild a barn damaged by a tornado.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

On June 26, 2018, a tornado hit our Kentucky farm, causing major damage to our back barn, the roof of the front barn, our trailers, and our fencing and minor damage to the house. We had 10 stalls that needed an entire new roof, electric, and supports, and our front barn roof sustained damage and needed to be replaced.

Without this grant, we would not have been able to house all of our horses in the inclement weather, especially with winter coming.

How many pets did this grant help?

10

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

One of our permanent residents, in the sanctuary program, is Charlie (first photo). He is 40 years old and blind and when it is bad weather — icy or very snowy — he is brought inside where it’s warmer and he has nice shavings with fresh water, hay and feed. His picture is attached.