COVID-19 Operation Grant

Town of Saugerties Animal Shelter: COVID-19 Operation Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The $250 awarded to the Saugerties Animal Shelter from the 2020 COVID-19 Operation Grant was used to spay or neuter and rabies-vaccinate four cats as stated in our application. We do not have our own medical staff, so we rely on our local mobile unit, Upstate Spay and Neuter Services, to care for our pets medically. The cost to us for each cat is $65 for a spay or neuter, with a rabies vaccine included.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Medical costs are a major expense for our small shelter. $250 may not seem like a lot of money and four cats may not seem like a huge impact, but to us at the Saugerties Animal Shelter, it means the world — especially at this time when the pandemic has brought our fundraising and donations to a screeching halt. We greatly appreciate your support and contribution to our daily struggle to help as many animals we can.

How many pets did this grant help?

4

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

This grant award helped to get four cats ready for adoption. They are all now in loving homes, bringing pleasure to their new parents.

Pennsylvania SPCA: COVID-19 Operation Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

This grant was used to support the daily operations of our animal shelters during the COVID-19 pandemic. In order to protect the health and safety of our staff and the community, we needed to alter our operations and cancel some fundraising events, which placed a great strain on our budget. We appreciate supporters like the Petfinder Foundation who stepped up to fund us during this critical time of need.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant funds went directly to providing food, shelter, and medical care for the more than 500 animals currently in our care. The PSPCA rescues victims of animal cruelty and neglect and provides them with medical and behavioral rehabilitation until they are ready to find their forever homes.

How many pets did this grant help?

500

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

When Furby arrived in our care earlier this summer, he was on the brink of death. He had been brought in to our Lancaster Center as a stray. A good Samaritan had found him in a county park with a collar or leash embedded in his mouth. We don’t know how long the collar had been restricting his ability to eat and drink or how long he had been out on his own, but we knew he was in very bad shape. He was underweight, dirty, dehydrated and, most of all, had a severe wound in his mouth that needed immediate attention.

Our Lancaster team knew his case was urgent and immediately transported Furby to our shelter hospital at our Philadelphia headquarters. Before the trip, Furby was lethargic and not moving, so he was given fluids and off they went. Our staff member driving him was frightened that he might not make it.

But he did.

And when he arrived into the waiting hands of our veterinary team at Erie Avenue, he was taken immediately to surgery for a sedated wound flush. From there, he was put on fluids and given small amounts of food to help him gain weight and strength slowly and safely. Miraculously, he perked up in no time.

Today, he is gaining weight, healing well, and was just recently ADOPTED by a wonderful family.

Kitty Cat Prevent a Litter Society: COVID-19 Operation Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

We used this grant money to help adopt out our cats who have been in hospice care.
This grant allowed KCP to waive the adoption fee, to cover the costs of their medication for up to two months, and to provide food for up to two months and a visit with the vet after adoption to discuss the medical needs.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This helped our organization by removing a yearly cost of nearly $28,000 to care for these cats.

How many pets did this grant help?

4

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Rockstar, who was born on June 21, 2017, and was brought in to Kitty Cat PALS’ care when he was a kitten, was diagnosed with Feline Leukemia Virus. Rockstar had to have all his teeth removed due to this virus and has many food allergies. KCP has paid for Rockstar’s medical fees since he entered our care. We are all beyond thrilled, for many reasons, that he now has a forever home!

Sweet little Lemmon is the size of a kitten at 9 years old. Lemmon was found after being hit by a car. She came in to our KCP care missing all the pads on her feet, with no whiskers, half her hair missing, and broken teeth. She has severe allergies to just about everything. After much testing, analyzing and love, she has fully come around. (Although she still does not like other cats.)

We call Clifford “the ole man.” He is 15 years old. He came into our care in 2018, found abandoned after a drug raid, with rotted teeth, allergies and covered in fleas that lead him to have flea dermatitis. He is the sweetest old man around.

Henry is 8 years old and he came to us 4 years ago after he was found living under a house. He hardly looked like a cat upon arrival. Sadly, Henry has been diagnosed with kidney failure.

Small Lives Matter Kitten Rescue: COVID-19 Operation Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The money was used to provide spay and neuter services to three kittens named Sage (female), Thyme (female) and Fennel (male) and their mother, Rosemary.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It paid for spay and neuter surgery so they could be adopted. All of our cats and kittens are spayed or neutered before placement into your home for life and ending the kitten cycles for those kittens and cats.

How many pets did this grant help?

Three kittens and one adult cat.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

During COVID-19, all of our county shelters were closed and there was no place for the homeless cats and kittens in our county. We took in more than 100 kittens this summer and desperately needed funding. Rosemary, pregnant and with half of her fur falling out, showed up at the county shelter. The shelter put out a plea to save her and Small Lives Matter Kitten Rescue responded.

We saved Rosemary and put her into foster care. Two weeks later, she had four kittens in foster care: the herbs — Thyme, Sage, Basil and Fennel. The grant money was used to provide spay and neuter services to three of these kittens, Sage (female: $75), Thyme (female: $75), and Fennel (male: $50) and their mother, Rosemary ($75).

Rosemary and Fennel were adopted on July 11, 2020. Thyme and Sage are at the Frisky Cat Cafe waiting adoption.

Meet Thyme here.
Meet Sage here.

Upper Peninsula Animal Welfare Shelter: COVID-19 Operation Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Flea and tick treatment and vaccines $250 toward

Revolution 3pk Dog/Cat x quantity 5
Vanguard B Oral 25 x 1ds

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Revolution Plus is much needed for the shelter dogs and cats with ticks, ear mites and fleas etc., but it is costly. Vaccines are a must and again with the downside in monetary donations, the grant was an incredible help for us.

How many pets did this grant help?

the potential to help 250

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Beans is a cat that came to us in rough shape, he had lived outside for months. Revolution and vaccines were a must as he had had no previous vet care.

Remy is a great dog that was surrendered to us after the former family had a baby. She benefited from our routine vaccinations for which this grant helped us purchase. Here is her Petfinder link: https://www.petfinder.com/dog/remy-48477119/mi/negaunee/upper-peninsula-animal-welfare-shelter-mi557/

Protectors of Animals, Inc.: COVID-19 Operation Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The grant award was used to purchase needed dog food and supplies for foster homes during the COVID-19 pandemic.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

To limit the number of volunteers and staff in the shelter, all dogs in our care were moved into foster homes once our state was issued a COVID-19 shutdown order. This award allowed us to purchase food and other supplies needed for our foster homes to provide care for the dogs. This helped ease the financial burden of the COVID-19 impact on our shelter.

How many pets did this grant help?

12

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

AJ (now Fez) is a 10-year-old Chihuahua who came to us when his owner could no longer care for him. AJ is still very active and has a quite a unique trait: His tongue sticks out of his mouth! One of our spay/neuter clinic employees volunteered to foster him while our shelter animals were placed into foster care. The two quickly became fast friends and AJ was soon adopted!

Animal Lifeline of Iowa: COVID-19 Operation Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The money provided from the Petfinder Foundation Covid-19 grant was put towards our extensive veterinary invoice for rescuing dogs and cats with special needs, including a cat who needed an emergency c-section.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Providing medical care for animals with special medical needs in our specialty. The funds helped ensure we did not have to wait to provide care for animals in need.

How many pets did this grant help?

One: an emergency c-section for a cat

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Scottie was a very young cat who went into labor and was rushed to the veterinarian by a good Samaritan. It was quickly determined she was in distress and needed delivery assistance. Animal Lifeline immediately assumed responsibility for Scottie and she was given an emergency c-section, saving her and two of her babies!

Underdog Animal Rescue: COVID-19 Operation Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Our grant money was used for the care of a sweet little dog named Aria. Aria was left for dead in a field with a bullet in her leg. Thankfully, she was found, and the finder contacted one of our foster families, who quickly stepped up to take her in. They honestly did not think she would make it through the first night. Miraculously, three months, a leg amputation and major dental work later, she is doing great as a three-legged dog!

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

By helping us cover the cost of Aria’s care, this grant helped us save more than 350 dogs this year. The closure of animal shelters has meant that we’ve had to do all of the vetting ourselves that sometimes would be done by a shelter vet at a much lower cost. It’s been a challenge to get all of the dogs we are intaking in for spay/neuter surgery, but we have done it, and it has been so rewarding!

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Aria’s foster writes: “I’m going to try to do this without crying. Well, too much, anyway. Today was a hard one. Kelly Macauley Perry, the amazing woman who has fixed so, so many cats for me and has never asked for anything, called me. She said she had ladies trapping out in Bay Point and they came across a ‘sick puppy,’ the description by the kids who kindly showed these ladies the dog. Kelly needed someone to take this dog, so I said, of course, bring it over. The ladies scooped this dog up in a cat trap and brought it over. When the ladies went back to the neighborhood, they talked to the father of the children who alerted them to the dog. Story goes, the dog showed up ‘a few days ago’ in front of their house, and the daughter ‘put it behind the fence to keep it safe.’

“I have never in my life seen anything like this dog. To say she is a bag of bones is an understatement. Not only is there zero fat on this girl, she is so dehydrated that we couldn’t even get her skin pulled from her bones and her nails are so long that some have turned back into her pads.

“4/27: Aria saw the vet this afternoon. I am sure it was not fun for her. They clipped all of her nails. Two were embedded in her paws and infected. She is severely underweight. She currently weighs 5.5 lbs. It is estimated that she should weigh in the 12-15 lb. range. She has some expensive dental work on the horizon, but that can’t be done until she puts on some weight and gets a little healthier.

“5/10: Aria has finally gained some weight! She weighed in at a whopping 6.6 lbs.! She is still limping significantly on her front, right foot. Is that from the nail being embedded in her pad or does she have something actually wrong with her leg? Questions for the vet once she is at a weight where her little body can undergo the surgery to remove her rotten teeth and spay.

“5/24: She was spayed on the 19th and had her leg x-rayed. The news from the x-rays isn’t good. It has been decided that there is just too much damage to the leg to save it. I am heartbroken for her. She has been through so much and deserves so much better in her life. Whatever happened to her, we will never know. Is it a bullet, a pellet, whatever it is, shattered her joint. But, we will get her through this next hurdle. She will have the leg amputated and her nasty, painful teeth removed soon. Hopefully, once the painful leg is removed, she will be able to start healing her heart.”

Since then Aria has been doing amazing! She still has some recovery before we will adopt her out.

Loving Heart Animal Shelter: COVID-19 Operation Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

We have a senior special-needs boy who has to have daily prescription medications and prescription food. This money helped us purchase the bottle of Apoquel for his skin allergies. It also bought a bag of his ZD prescription food.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This helped us because right now with the Covid-19 pandemic, donations are down. We have to find ways to raise money because all public fundraisers have been cancelled.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Meet Frankie. We think he is about 10, but we’re not sure how old he really is. He was abandoned with three other dogs. We took them all in a few years ago. All have been adopted except Frankie. Finding someone to take on the added expense of a senior pet has been tough. He also was diagnosed with oral cancer last fall. We currently are looking only for hospice-type home for him.

Lowell Humane Society: COVID-19 Operation Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

To buy two trays of Feline Ultra Nasal FVRCP vaccines

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It helped protects incoming cats from disease and helped to make them adoption ready.

How many pets did this grant help?

40

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Skip Jack was rescued from a tree by a local animal control officer. Upon arrival, he was vaccinated and neutered. Although not feral, Skip Jack is having a difficult time adjusting in a shelter environment. He has not been adopted, but will be transferred to a rescue partner this week with volunteers who specialize in cats like Skip Jack. This is a prime example of the positive impact collaborations can have: government agencies working with shelters, working with rescues, all with the same goals in mind.