COVID-19 Operation Grant

A New Chance Animal Rescue: COVID-19 Operation Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Some of this grant was used towards medical care for a dog who came to us from a backyard breeder. Dorothy’s care totaled over $1,500. This grant was used to help pay for the x-rays that were needed to evaluate her orthopedic issues that had been left untreated for years. This grant was also used to help cover the cost of monthly preventatives for some of our dogs.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped to subsidize some of the medical-care costs associated with dogs in our care (see above). We have been struggling with fundraising, so it was a welcome relief to have this grant to help with a few of our expenses.

How many pets did this grant help?

8

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Dorothy was rescued from a backyard breeder, where she spent the first 8 years of her life living in a rabbit hutch. She needed 13 dental extractions, and had a grade-2 heart murmur, bilateral medial patella luxation, cataracts, and bilateral hip dysplasia with moderate degenerative joint disease.

Dorothy was a matted mess when she came into our care, and she also had allergies and skin issues. Once we got her healthy, she was adopted by a wonderful woman who needed Dorothy’s love as much as Dorothy needed hers.

Chasin Tail Rescue, Inc.: COVID-19 Operation Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The $250 grant was applied to medical care for Jean, a stray dog who was underweight and had severe skin conditions. She is now at one of our North Carolina foster homes, making a complete recovery, and hopefully she will be adopted soon.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

At the time we were considering Jean, there was a significant chance we would have passed her up without this grant.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Jean was a stray with some sores or a skin condition on her hind end; she was also definitely underweight. She was not being adopted at the shelter, so Chasin Tail Rescue pulled her on Aug. 14 and she has been with a foster since. When she has completely recovered, she will be put up for adoption. When she was picked up, she had a tear in her eye, captured in one of the photos.

Humane Society of Summit County: COVID-19 Operation Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Grant support from the Petfinder Foundation was used to support our foster program, which quickly expanded to include available animals following the onset of the coronavirus pandemic.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Specifically, funding from the Petfinder Foundation provided the means to purchase essential foster-care supplies such as large crates, bedding, bowls, food, and toys to support our foster families while they temporarily cared for our animals.

How many pets did this grant help?

19

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

During the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic, our available dogs needed foster families, and our organization was lucky to have many families reach out to us willing to open their hearts and homes to an animal in need.

Ryker, a young pit-bull terrier mix, was one of our available dogs in need of a foster family. He was soon matched with a generous family, and Ryker settled in well to his new temporary home.

Things didn’t remain temporary for long though!

Ryker immediately bonded with the family’s resident senior pit-bull terrier mix, Panda, who was adopted from HSSC in 2016. With his silly and playful personality, Ryker helped to bring out the puppy hiding in Panda, and the pair became inseparable.

Ryker also won over the heart of his new dad, who, when making his initial decision to foster, insisted that the arrangement would be temporary. The two became best buds.

Ryker fit into his foster family so well that they officially adopted him!

Benld Adopt-A-Pet: COVID-19 Operation Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The grant funds were used to purchase enough vaccines to vaccinate at least 50 of our pets. All of our pets are kept up-to-date on vaccinations.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

In the past couple months, our intake numbers have not necessarily increased, as they have at many shelters, but we have taken in more animals needing immediate and follow-up medical care. The increased medical expenses have greatly impacted our budget. The Petfinder Foundation grant enabled us to ensure that we had the needed vaccines on hand so that pets at the shelter stayed up-to-date on vaccinations and all pets adopted were up-to-date on vaccinations.

How many pets did this grant help?

50

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Lou Anne (first photo) is a kitten who was brought to the shelter in August. Below is part of the story we posted about Lou Anne on Facebook. We did the vaccinations for Lou Anne as needed, and she received emergency care and surgery at vet clinics in Springfield.

Friday afternoon, the shelter office manager did not get to go home as planned. Instead, she drove an injured kitten towards Springfield. She was met partway by our acting shelter director, who then took the kitten to the Animal Emergency Clinic in Springfield, IL.

The kitten had been brought to the Benld shelter that afternoon. She had been found in the middle of a road by Lake Lou Yaeger in Litchfield. A lady stopped to check and move what she thought was a dead kitten. She found two kittens; one was deceased and the second was alive, but severely injured. She wrapped up the injured kitten and brought it to the shelter looking for help.

We decided that bringing the kitten to Springfield was the only option, as the local animal hospitals were closing for the night. The kitten’s mouth was bleeding, her jaw appeared broken, and a back leg was shattered with bone exposed.

They could not hear her lung sounds at the shelter because the kitten would not stop purring. We had to take a chance that the doctors at the Animal Emergency Clinic could help her or, if not, to at least help her pass away free of pain and fear.

Little kitten Lou Anne spent the weekend at the emergency clinic on antibiotics and fluids. She was even able to eat a little. Monday morning, Lou Anne will go to Coble Animal Hospital. The plan is to amputate her shattered leg and stabilize her jaw.

Lou Anne was an excellent patient! She was sweet to everyone and healed quickly. She was just recently adopted by a friend of the shelter, who several years ago adopted a dog from us named Ruby. Ruby had also been in horrible shape (emaciated — she’d been purposely starved by her owner) when she arrived at the shelter. Ruby and Lou Anne are the best of friends now (second photo) and Lou Anne races around the house like a mad kitten!

Cinnamon (third photo) came to the shelter very pregnant! She soon had 10 pups at her foster home. They are almost ready for adoption.

Callie (fourth photo) was also brought to the shelter pregnant. Her owners had taken her to the vet to be spayed, but when they learned that she was pregnant they did not spay her and the vet contacted us to ask if we would be able to take her. Callie and her kittens will also be ready for adoption soon. Callie is such a good mom!

Lexington Humane Society: COVID-19 Operation Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The $1,000 grant was used to help cover the medicating costs for 20 animals in our care. This includes vaccinations, parasite treatment and control, and testing.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Receiving $1,000 to help cover vet expenses during the initial stage of the pandemic was such a relief to our organization. With the closure and cancellation of fundraising events, our income will drop by $300,000 this year alone.

How many pets did this grant help?

20

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Nikita arrived at LHS in March as a scared, nervous girl. She stayed in the back of her cage and was shy with adopters who passed by her cage in our Adoption Center. When LHS closed to the public due to the pandemic, we sent as many animals into foster homes as possible, including Nikita. After a few months in her foster home, she began to feel safe and gain confidence. Nikita thrived! Her foster mom knew it was meant to be after their months of home-quarantining together and adopted her in July. Thanks to the grant, we were able to fund her continuing vet care over the five months she was in LHS’s care.

Rebound Hounds: COVID-19 Operation Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Funds were used to provide vetting and supplies for three “fospice” dogs, a program for seniors and medical dogs whom Rebound supports for life. These dogs require constant vetting and a steady supply of medication and other supplies.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped three senior fospice dogs by providing needed vet care and supplies so that they could remain healthy and comfortable in their golden years.

How many pets did this grant help?

3

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Fourteen-year-old Venus is one senior fospice beneficiary of this grant. We took her into our care after she was surrendered to the Manhattan ACC shelter. Her owner was no longer able to care for her, likely because of her extensive and expensive medical issues. Venus has Cushing’s disease and came to us with many dental needs and a torn ACL. She has so much life left to live but has many common problems we see in senior dogs. We absolutely adore her! She is living in a forever home with her fospice mom, Nicole, where she spends her days sunbathing, taking slow walks in the woods, and eating a healthy and nourishing diet.

Sheltering Hands, Inc.: COVID-19 Operation Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The funds were used for adoption preparation, which includes medical exams, spay/neuter, microchips, dentals and vaccinations.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

During Covid-19, we saw our adoptions increase by 25-50% in the months directly after quarantine began. This increased our anticipated budget for adoption prep, which typically costs our organization about $75 a kitten. An adult cat with no issues who is already spayed/neutered costs about $25 for the vet exam, vaccinations and microchip. We did have one cat who was three years old who needed to have all but four teeth extracted, which cost $276. We were able to take in six additional kittens and two adults, one of whom needed a dental.

How many pets did this grant help?

8

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Indy was adopted as a kitten and unfortunately did not receive proper medical care. He and his brother Speedway were taken in by Sheltering Hands. During his intake exam, it was determined that he had severe dental issues and needed to have most, if not all, of his teeth removed.

While waiting for his extractions, Indy played with all of the other cats, including his brother. You would never know he was in pain. The volunteers fell in love. Indy loved to play with humans and reward them with cuddles.

Indy is now in his forever home and, last time we checked, his new mom was more in love with him than she was the day he picked her to live with.

Animal Rescue Connections: COVID-19 Operation Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The funding provided from this grant project was utilized to purchase several large crates for temporary housing for cats.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

When our adoption center was forced to close due to COVID-19 restrictions right before kitten season begins here in south Texas, we were forced to reintegrate more than 15 cats back into foster homes that had already taken in new families. Crates were utilized to help keep animals/families separated during transitions and, in one case, allow a young mama kitty to be brought into care with her kittens when we wouldn’t otherwise have been able to intake the family.

How many pets did this grant help?

12

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Cream-sickle was a young, feral cat whom we had attempted to trap for some time, particularly when we noticed she was pregnant. She disappeared from her regular feeding station for about three weeks, then returned with her three kittens in tow.

Because our foster homes were overcrowded with cats who had been returned to them from the adoption center, Cream-sickle was caught with her kittens and housed in a foster home in a semi-private room within her own (blocked-off) large crate. She and the kittens lived there until the kittens were old enough to be weaned.

When we took Cream-sickle to have her spayed, she was already 5-6 weeks pregnant again, according to the doctor — having gotten pregnant again at an unheard of 2-3 weeks post-delivery.

Cream-sickle returned to her crate for rest after her surgery, and her kittens were acclimated to a “kitten nursery” in one of the foster’s other rooms so Cream-sickle could rest and recover. Cream-sickle has since been returned to her outdoor home, and the kittens will be ready for adoption in October!

Badass Brooklyn Animal Rescue: COVID-19 Operation Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The entire Badass Brooklyn community remains grateful to the Petfinder Foundation for your $750 grant. With the funding, we paid for urgent medical needs for dogs in our foster care.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The Petfinder Foundation grant helped us provide medical services to three of our rescues whom we retrieved from high-[intake] shelters in the south:

Moira Rose (first and second photos) is an adult Chihuahua mix who also had surgery for her cranial cruciate ligament, and funding paid for her post-surgery vet visit ($125).

Robert March (third and fourth photos) is a senior hound mix who came to us with an array of health issues. Funding paid for treatment of his respiratory issues — which turned out to be heartworm — including a fungal serology panel ($475) and medications ($25).

Cliff Booth (fifth and sixth photos) is an adult shepherd mix who had surgery for his torn cranial cruciate ligament (the same as ACL surgery for humans), and funding paid for his post-surgery vet visit ($125).

How many pets did this grant help?

Three

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We rescued Moira Rose (first and second photos) from a hoarding situation in Georgia, where her medical needs had been sadly neglected. When she arrived in Brooklyn in the fall of 2019, we found that she needed heartworm treatment and CCL surgery! After recovering from her heartworm treatment in April 2020, she was cleared for the surgery. Our fosters who cared for her through recovery fell in love and adopted her in late May! She will live out her full and happy long life with a dog brother and many adoring fans.

Dolly's Legacy Animal Rescue: COVID-19 Operation Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Dolly’s Legacy Animal Rescue used the $500 award to help with the spay/neuter costs for the many dogs and cats we rescued during the July timeframe. We were able to provide about five surgeries for the rescued animals with the money. We are so grateful for the funding!

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

During this time of COVID, there was an increase in people looking to adopt pets and there are always more animals that need to be rescued than there should be. This grant helped our organization to provide spay/neuter fees for some of the dogs and cats who came from high[-intake] shelter areas to Nebraska so they were ready for adoptions.

Our organization takes on all kinds of cases and, sadly, a number of expensive heartworm cases (with great outcomes, mind you!), so additional funding is important to us because it allows us to stretch resources and get to our organization’s ultimate goal of saving all the animals that we can. We are so grateful for the funding!

How many pets did this grant help?

5+

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

One of the puppies helped by this grant was Warrior. He came from Oklahoma, where their shelters are overwhelmed and under-funded. He had been abandoned. Our organization partners with an individual in Oklahoma who helps to tag animals for our rescue and send them to Nebraska for better lives. Warrior arrived in early July from Oklahoma and stayed with a foster while he was vetted and neutered (with the Petfinder Foundation’s grant!). He found his family in August! Warrior is a black-and-white puppy and the photos show him at transport (coming in from Oklahoma), with his foster family, and, finally, at adoption day with his forever family!