Build-A-Bear Youth Humane Education Grant

Maclean-Animal Adoption Center: Build-A-Bear Youth Humane Education Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The funds were used to purchase a large Konica Minolta printer, which helped to cut down on our printing costs and keeps more money in our facility and helping the animals in our care.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped the pets in our care by saving money on printing costs. The funds saved were then able to be used to take care of the animals in our facility.

How many pets did this grant help?

Thus far, this grant has helped more than 500 animals and continues to help the animals in our facility.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Most recently, Chestnut is one of our long-term residents at the Maclean-Cameron Animal Adoption Center. She is a senior girl at 9 years old, but you wouldn’t believe that when she runs after a tennis ball. She likes to be the only animal in the house, but enjoys kids — especially when they throw her favorite toy for her to fetch! At the end of a long day of playing, her favorite thing is to snuggle and give kisses.

Chestnut was a hard dog to find a home for because she is older but still very spunky and has a dislike for cats. She was adopted twice and came back due to the families not being able to take care of Chestnut’s needs. She has finally found her perfect family with three kids to run with and no other animals to take her attention.

M&M’s Fur-Ever Furbabies: Build-A-Bear Youth Humane Education Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

MMFFR was awarded the Build A Bear Youth Humane Education Grant by the Petfinder Foundation in 2017 to assist with our youth program N.G.A.A. (Next Generation Animal Advocates). The funding was used to purchase new supplies for the youth participants, advertising of the program and for transportation which allowed the youth participants to attend the program and events.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant helped the youth participants of the program by providing proper animal behavior-training techniques and teaching responsible pet ownership practices. The pets of our organization benefited through having the youth participants assist with handling, bathing, walking, feeding, and socializing with them. They also each had a specific youth volunteer who worked with an individual animal, which they then advocated for at events to help find them forever homes.

How many pets did this grant help?

20

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Because so many were helped as the result of this grant, it was hard to choose just one to speak about. One who stands out would have to be Mystasha (first photo), a female pit-bull terrier who was abused prior to being rescued. She was particularly afraid of men and boys, but through working with the youth participants of N.G.A.A., Mystasha was able to overcome her fear and open up to a young boy named Alex who advocated for her while he attended the program. They became very close and bonded, which lead to Alex and his family adopting Mystasha. She now lives with them as the princess she’s always been.

Santa Cruz Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals: Build-A-Bear Youth Humane Education Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

We used $1,650 this year to offer full-coverage scholarships to our summer-camp for students who would normally not be able to afford it.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

-It helped us to bring humane education to the most underserved members of our community
-Each of the campers wrote a story or made a video that went up on our website to help get one of our adoptable animals a home.

How many pets did this grant help?

Six shelter pets, as well as the animals already in the homes of each of these campers.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

ADOPTED! Hi, I’m Randall (first photo). Once I know you, I will jump into your arms and kiss your face. I love to go on walks and I walk really well on my leash. I am still pretty young, so I would really like to go to a training class and have lots of playtime with you and other dogs. As I can be a bit shy at first, I would feel most comfortable with older kids who can give me my space when I need it. If I sound like the puppy for you then please adopt me! [Written by summer camper Allison, age 9]

ADOPTED on June 28, 2018! Hi, my name is Paula (second photo). I am small and shy, but I can be very sweet once I get to know you. I would much rather have a quiet, adult home, as young children might be too much for me. I need lots of love, especially since it takes time for me to warm up to people. I had a special surgery on my back legs and now I am all better! [Written by summer camper Vivienne, age 6]

ADOPTED! Hi, I’m Diamond (third photo). I might be a little shy at first, but once I get used to you, I will wag my tail and jump in your lap. I hope you will adopt me soon! [Written by summer campers Ava, age 7, and Kenia, age 9]

Pets Alive: Build-A-Bear Youth Humane Education Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

This grant is being used for expansion of our Humane Education Program, now called the Pets Alive Kids Team, or PAKT. We are currently in Phase 2 of the project. Phase 1 was completed in Q1 2018, including creation of the expanded program, finding suitable space to hold the education sessions, and marketing/awareness-raising. A graphic-designer volunteer created a new logo for use with our marketing materials that utilized our regular logo. Through a partnership with our local community, a nursing facility that’s both close to our shelter and centrally located – Glen Arden in Goshen, NY – has agreed to host our program by donating conference-room space for our monthly sessions. Over time, we may expand locations as the program matures.

To date, we have spent $1,000 of the $3,045 awarded. We purchased books to be used with the participants; marketing materials at events to advertise the program; a laptop computer to use at the sessions; and supplies that are used in the sessions. The remaining grant money will be used to procure an overhead projector for use with the classes (to project what’s on the laptop) and additional class supplies. Each session has a theme; for example, during the last session, the kids made dog toys out of various materials.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We held our inaugural Humane Education session on April 29 and had our second session on May 27, 2018. We will be holding future sessions the last Sunday of each of the month. During our first session, 36 people attended, an equal mix of adults and children. Since we held the session in a nursing facility, a number of residents attended along with their grandchildren. After a book reading, the participants engaged in an activity and made shelters out of Styrofoam boxes to provide a warm and safe home for community cats. The shelters were then presented to one of the staff members at the nursing facility who cares for community cats on the nursing-home property. A short slide show of the event is shown here: https://youtu.be/13Q5SYlvxYs

During the second session, the two dozen attendees made more than 50 dog toys that will be used at our shelter to provide enrichment to the animals as they await adoption. The classes will help the pets in our care through the increased visibility of the program and its connection to our organization and helping attendees understand compassion for animals. Several attendees expressed an interest in volunteering at our shelter to help the animals in our care. We anticipate this will be another avenue to widen our volunteer reach; we depend upon volunteers to help us care for the animals.

How many pets did this grant help?

250

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

At Pets Alive, 250-300 animals are living at our facility at any given time, reaping the benefits of the kindness of our community. Recently, attendees from our Pets Alive Kids Team (PAKT) humane-education program made more than 50 dog toys to provide enrichment for our dogs as they await their forever homes. One in particular is Chico, a young 2-year-old dog who recently came to Pets Alive. He loves to run around in our play yard, fetching a dog toy and playing catch! He is one of the many recipients of the dog toys recently made by PAKT team members. Here is his Petfinder story: http://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/41524758

Rural Animal Rescue Effort (RARE): Build-A-Bear Youth Humane Education Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Laptop for presentations
Projector for presentations
Supplies for education workshops
Training and certification for therapy dogs

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

As a result of the Build A Bear Youth Education Grant, we have been able to perform presentations during our Youth Education Workshops and we will begin presenting to schools in the fall of 2018. The main objective of our youth education program is to bring awareness regarding humane treatment of animals, spay/neuter, adoption and volunteering to the young people of our communities. Our focus is on the most rural areas of Tennessee, as the overpopulation there is the highest. As we educate towards animal “guardianship” rather than animal “ownership,” our youth begin to value companion animals as part of their families. We believe that education starts with our youth. The Build A Bear Youth Education Grant is helping us to grow our education program and allowing us to purchase tools that are enhancing our presentations and program overall. The attendees of our workshops have added enrichment and socialization for the animals in our care. We will also have one of our adoptable dogs (and possibly a cat and rabbit as well!) become a therapy animal this summer to attend our school presentations.

How many pets did this grant help?

4

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

During our youth-education workshops, children are learning appropriate handling of animals and how to provide proper care as animal guardians. We also have enrichment sections of the workshops, with puppy playtime and socialization with children in order for both children and puppies to learn how to play appropriately. One child claimed to be the “dog whisperer,” as she had all of the puppies from a group following her around like the pied piper. Another gained confidence as he and Carlo the cat (fourth and fifth photos) became friends in the cattery. Unfortunately, the family’s dog was not cat-friendly, but we are still hoping that, by word of mouth, Carlo will find his furever home!

From Carlo’s Petfinder profile: “Hi, I’m Carlo, a.k.a. the friendliest cat on the planet! I just love being around people and getting attention. I will help you do your housework, watch TV with you and take naps. I was fortunate enough to be rescued by RARE from [an open-admission] shelter in a rural town in Tennessee. I would make a loving addition to any home, and hope to meet my new forever family soon!” Meet him: http://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/41276423

Operation Kindness: Build-A-Bear Youth Humane Education Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The $3,045 grant was used to provide support for our Humane Education Program. The donation directly funded the design and printing of a new Humane Education activity/coloring book that teaches kids about care for their pet, adoption, and approaching strange animals. We were able to print 5,000 books for all of the children we serve annually.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The Humane Education Program is a vital component of preventing animal cruelty, reducing owner surrender, and increasing awareness about spaying and neutering family pets. The Humane Education Team focuses on reaching students in after-school programs. We identified the need for humane community education by talking to our constituents, partner organizations, and the public. Other organizations are addressing needs for animal services such as low-cost spay/neuter, “trap, neuter, release” programs for feral cats, and low-cost vaccines. However, no other organization was providing community education or surrender prevention in this geographic area.

Our Humane Education team targets elementary and middle-school children through after-school programs in under-served neighborhoods of North Texas. The goal is to teach children about interacting with animals and treating animals with respect. The projected benefit is that children will learn about responsible pet ownership, including the importance of spay/neuter, humane animal treatment, and proper pet care. The goal is that children will bring that message home to their families, and will keep it with them into adulthood. As we deliver this education, we expect the incidence of animal abuse, unwanted litters, and stray animals to decline in the areas in which we teach.

How many pets did this grant help?

N/A

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

This grant will allow us to provide each child we serve with a fun activity/coloring book that teaches them about how to care for their animal, where to adopt an animal and how to choose the right animal for their family, what a veterinarian is, how to approach a strange animal, word search, matching game, maze and much more!

Wyoming County SPCA: Build-A-Bear Youth Humane Education Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The grant we received from the Petfinder Foundation/Build-a-Bear for $3,045 was partially used to buy books recommended by Red Rover. Ms. Pamela Doore, a certified elementary educator, leads our education program and is certified in the Red Rover program. Ms. Doore has presented her Red Rover program three times so far since January 2018 using these books as the subject. The students loved the program and had many questions. The other part of the grant was used to supply 49 area classrooms, grades K-4, with subscriptions to Kind News. The feedback we have gotten has been very positive. The publication was well-received and inspired a “kind to animals” conversation. We were excited to bring both of these programs to the students to encourage and educate current and future pet owners and to teach the children how to live in harmony with animals. We thank you very much!!

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant allowed us to continue an education program for another year at a much larger scale than last year. From this exposure, we had groups outside the classroom come to visit and do some hands-on work with the cats in our shelter. One of these groups was a Boy Scout troop who earned badges. Another was a 4H group who, by their creed, gave back to the community with handmade cat toys. This summer will bring more groups to pitch in for the animals.

How many pets did this grant help?

An endless number — these children will take what they have learned about kindness into their future.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

The education of youth has an indirect benefit. We’d like to share a story that inspired us to build and expand our education program. It was mid-October when two boys, both about 14 years old, found a mother cat who had been hit by a car and was lying in the street. Around her were her two 4-week-old kittens, huddled against her for warmth. These two boys could have walked away, but they didn’t. They had no means to care for the cats and did not know what to do, but they did not walk away. They scooped up the kittens and called WCSPCA. These boys come from a “rough” home life, but something inside of them made them do the right thing. This is what we want to instill in each and every child. The two kittens, Winston and Harmony, are pictured. Although their mother, sadly, passed away, both kittens have been adopted.

Friends for Pets Foundation: Build-A-Bear Youth Humane Education Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

See below.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Recognition by the Petfinder Foundation with the awarding of this grant brought FFP recognition and involvement from various Boy and Girl Scout groups, community-service school leaders, and parents who wished to involve their children to be in a worthwhile enterprise.

How many pets did this grant help?

Approximately 45

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

The grant was used to expand our student involvement program. Each Sunday, under the direction of Will Moffitt, our Volunteer Coordinator, volunteers of all ages gather to walk, bathe, exercise, and love the FFP dogs. Students, many working on community-service hours, often are in the group. Many enjoy the involvement so greatly that they continue volunteering after their service hours are completed. Included are photos of student volunteers with the dogs who benefited from their attention.

Ruff Start Rescue: Build-A-Bear Youth Humane Education Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Grant funds were used in part to print copies of presentation materials. We also purchased pens, sticky note pads, and animal welfare coloring books for our formal education presentations. For our arts and crafts events for children, we purchased feral cat house supplies: Rubbermaid totes, Styrofoam coolers, straw, and duct tape. Paracord and latches were purchased to make leashes. Wooden dowels, felt, ribbon, thread, glue guns and eyelet hooks were purchased to make cat fishing toys. Cardboard boxes will be decorated with the purchased construction paper and markers. These boxes will used as hiding spots for rescued cats. Fleece will be used to create small beds inside the boxes and to make toys for the animals in our care.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant supported our Children’s Education Program. We believe that education is key to improving the lives and welfare of animals in the generations to come. Our formal presentations and arts-and-crafts activities allow children the opportunity to learn about animal welfare issues and develop a passion and appreciation for all animal kind. We anticipate that with all items purchased for our arts-and-crafts activities, at least 200 dogs and cats will receive enrichment items made by children in our community. For example, cats in our care will have a safe place to lounge while at our facility. The cardboard houses will allow them to perch on top of these boxes or sleep/hide inside them. Fleece toys will be made for dogs and cats in our care, and fishing toys will serve as a great energy expender for our foster cats. Additionally, some children made feral-cat houses with some of the products purchased. Colony caretakers will be picking up these houses over the next week. This is perfect timing, as we are in the heart of winter in Minnesota, and providing adequate shelter for feral/barn cats is a lifesaving measure.

How many pets did this grant help?

214

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We were contacted by a woman who cares for 38 feral cats. She was grateful to hear that we were making feral-cat houses through our Children’s Education Program. After our recent children’s arts event (see pictures) we were able to provide this caretaker with six Rubbermaid houses to support her colony. We are so grateful that we were able to provide these cats with safe and warm places to live. We also received some great feedback from a high-school student who attended a recent education presentation. This student is very interested in getting a dog. He informed us that he learned a lot from the presentation about what responsibilities are required in owning a dog and what the needs of the animal are.

Heartland Rescue Ranch: Build-A-Bear Youth Humane Education Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The Build-A-Bear Humane Education Grant helped Heartland Rescue Ranch educate hundreds of children in Bay County. We used the funding mainly to host field trips and family-fun days where children could have fun while learning. We were able to bring out 150 girls who attend Girls, Inc., a lower-income daycare-type program. We had a day for families that are caring for and have adopted children from the foster-care system. One day we hosted a group from Bethel Village, a drug-rehab facility for women. These women were able to spend the day with their children at the rescue.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We also purchased supplies that will continue to help our education programs: visual aides; a costume for our mascot, Henry the Heartland hound; books; etc.

How many pets did this grant help?

100s

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We were also able to put together a booklet that I have wanted to do for a long time, as well as a one-page sheet of pet life-expectancy timelines. The booklet I would love to share with other rescues — just some fun tidbits about various pets, but the main thing we want to teach children is that pets are not disposable; they are a lifetime commitment.