Bar Dog Operation Grant

The Humane Society and Animal Rescue of Muskegon County: Bar Dog Operation Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

We used the $500 granted to us to purchase one month’s worth of vaccines for our shelter pets.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This was a blessing; we were able to vaccinate a month’s worth of pets coming into our care. Vaccinations ensure that our pets remain healthy as they wait to find their forever homes. Vaccines are a big expense for our organization, so we appreciate grants that can help cover these kinds of required medical costs of running an animal shelter.

How many pets did this grant help?

150

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

During this grant period, we had a transport mission that went down to Arkansas and brought up 19 dogs that were in desperate need at one of our partner shelters. Bringing these dogs up while continuing our normal intake can put a strain on our medical budget, but thanks to the support of this grant, we were able to cover the vaccine costs without issue.

I’m attaching photos of animals that cane to us from this rescue and benefitted from the vaccines purchased by this grant.

One in particular is Popcorn (first photo), a gorgeous white puppy who arrived malnourished. We are hoping Popcorn will find his fur’ever home this week. The majority of the animals from this transport have found homes already, though.

Lewis County Humane Society: Bar Dog Operation Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

This grant of $500 was used for the needs of the animals in the shelter that are available for adoption. We have several dogs with special food needs due to allergies, skin irritations, or dental issues. Any animal leaving the shelter is required to be spayed or neutered, so this money helps with some of that cost. Currently we have a couple of senior cats, mommas with kittens, and an FIV-positive cat with special food needs and supplements.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Our current vet bills, food bills, and cat litter bills are extremely high right now. We have had an overwhelming number of animals surrendered or rescued this year and this money helps us tremendously with those issues. As a small rural shelter, we try to save all the animals we can so they have a second chance at a loving home. We rely on our community, volunteers, and supporters. Receiving grant awards is very special and helps us assist more animals in need.

How many pets did this grant help?

15

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Bella is one of our success stories and was helped by this grant. When she arrived at the shelter, she was scared of her own shadow, extremely underweight, and would throw up from eating too fast (first photo). We were able to purchase a slow-feed bowl and a tunnel tent for her to feel protected in and support her special needs.

Bella was adopted in March 2021 and is doing fantastic. She has come out of her shell and loves life. You will see this by the comments from her new family in the second, third, and fourth photos.

Vlad (fifth photo) and Tiger (sixth photo) are senior cats who needed special food. Vlad was adopted in April 2021 and is spoiled rotten by his new family.

Tiger is a 12-year-old male with a mind of his own. He loves living at the shelter and seems to want to stay with us. He was adopted twice, but decided to do his business outside the litter box (he doesn’t do that at the shelter) both times and was returned. Nothing the new owners did worked in order to keep him in their home. Tiger is reaping the benefits of this grant money with his daily wet and dry cat food, treats, comfortable bed, and toys. He is still available for adoption and we are hoping the third time is the charm! You can meet Tiger here.

Casa de Love Animal Rescue: Bar Dog Operation Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The money was used to buy special food, supplements, and shampoo for several of our medical dogs.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It helped us help our special-needs dogs become healthy and adoptable.

How many pets did this grant help?

5

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We rescued Lucas from the shelter. He was in the most horrific condition and there was no one stepping up for him. His time was up. He had the worst case of mange — no hair! In addition, he had really bad ear infections and horrific teeth. He was adopted today!

Green Acres Animal Rescue: Bar Dog Operation Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The money was used to purchase dog toys, leashes, bowls, material for beds for kennels, treats for training, and microchips.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This money helped our organization by providing necessary supplies to ensure that the dogs we rescue feel comfortable in their new temporary environment. It also provided the opportunity for us to purchase microchips to provide safety to the animal and its new owner so that the pet will be reunited with their owner should they get loose. The Kong toys purchased will help with training, limiting aggression, and providing exercise and entertainment to these dogs while they are in a rescue environment.

How many pets did this grant help?

6

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Abby was an 8-year-old terrier whose owner passed away. She was shy and depressed. She would lie around and curl up in a ball and just stay by herself. After we bought toys and some soft crinkle toys, a special small bed, and some treats for her, she came out of her shell.

We had a crinkle teddy-bear toy and would throw it for her and she would run and get it and bring it back. Her tail wagged and she would jump several feet in the air to grab it. She loved the treats we gave her too. Her previous owner lived in an apartment so she had to be on a leash all the time. We provided her with exercise time off the leash in a fenced area and she would run around with her tail wagging.

She opened up so much and when she was adopted! At check-in, the family said she was so happy, sat on their laps, and loved to play. It seems like she became a few years younger just with our providing her entertainment and exercise.

Misty Eyes Dog Shelter & Humane Education Learning Center dba Misty Eyes Animal Center, Inc.: Bar Dog Operation Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

This $500 grant was used to purchase flea/tick and heartworm-prevention medications for dogs rescued by Misty Eyes.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

All Misty Eyes pets receive routine and special-needs animal-care services (medical, dental, and behavioral) prior to adoption. Routine care includes flea/tick and heartworm preventions.

An important method for getting pets healthy is providing flea/tick and heartworm-prevention medications, a treatment recommended for all companion pets. Misty Eyes gives dogs their first dose of Iverhart and flea/tick prevention on intake. Then the dogs receive it every month until adoption to ensure their health. At times, their next dose is sent home with the new adoptive family to ensure that they are given enough time to submit the medical records to their veterinarian so they can start purchasing the preventions.

As of March 30th, we had already rescued 56 dogs for the year. Forty of these dogs were transferred from under-resourced rural communities across Indiana through our Lifesaver Pet Transfer Program. We are on track to rescue 225 dogs by year-end. Fifty percent of these will come through the Lifesaver Program. This grant helped us to continue to increase our efforts to rescue dogs from under-resourced communities in which they are at the highest risk for euthanasia.

How many pets did this grant help?

33 dogs

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

All dogs rescued by Misty Eyes receive flea/tick and heartworm preventions as part of their routine care prior to adoption. Here are two dogs who benefitted:

Adam (first three photos) is a super sweet 12-year-old Schnauzer mix who wound up in an overcrowded shelter when his owner passed away. This shelter, which is located in a rural, under-resourced Indiana community, had heard about our Lifesaver Pet Transfer Program and our Seniors Saving Seniors Program. In January 2021, they contacted us about this little man and we were happy to transport him into our organization.

Adam had quite a few medical needs when he came to us. The worst was his poor little mouth. It was just loaded with rotten teeth. He had to feel absolutely awful and that type of decay can lead to so many other problems, including infections and heart problems. We also found that he had a couple of growths that looked very suspicious and needed to be removed. Our wonderful team of veterinarians took great care of Adam. He did lose most of his teeth, but he feels so much better. The growth was removed and sent out for labs. Luckily, it was benign and he has healed up very well. Adam has now been adopted into a loving home where he can live out his years in comfort.

Francine (aka Frankie), bottom four photos: In January 2021, this beautiful, sweet, but extremely skinny pit-bull mix was found roaming the streets of Indianapolis by a good Samaritan. Three weeks later, the Samaritan brought her to Misty Eyes due to concerns about her declining condition.

We discovered that she was critically underweight, lethargic, vomiting frequently, and couldn’t keep anything down. She only weighed 24 lbs., when for her estimated age of 1-2 years, she should have weighed 40-50 lbs. We got her to an animal hospital right away. She had surgery to remove a long, black piece of fabric from her abdomen and spent three days there in recovery.

Since then, she has recovered beautifully and gained weight with the help of her foster mom, Laura. She is a loving, snuggly, and playful pup who loves to play with other dogs and cats (and humans)! In March 2021, she was adopted. She has adjusted quickly to her new family. She loves to sleep with her new dad, run around her fenced yard and the woods behind it with her family, and play with her new “brother,” Otis.

Stray Hearts Animal Shelter: Bar Dog Operation Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Spay and neuter funding to help fill a gap between a contracted veterinarian and a full-time, in-house veterinarian.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We were able to spay and neuter 11 animals with these funds. These animals then either were returned to or adopted into their forever homes, or transferred to our partner no-kill, high-adoption-rate shelters.

How many pets did this grant help?

11

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Quincy (first photo) was one of four puppies who were brought to us. These giant and fluffy puppies were so adorable, they found their forever homes quickly. Thanks to this grant, Quincy was able to be neutered and head to his forever home. Since finishing the grant, all of Quincy’s siblings have been adopted and are also heading home.

Cow (second photo) was picked up as a stray, unaltered, and brought to Stray Hearts, but this cutie wasn’t here for long before she found her forever home. We were able to use this grant money to get her altered and into her new home.

A Forever Home Animal Rescue: Bar Dog Operation Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The $250 was used toward the purchase of an order for vaccines from ValleyVet.com. The order total was $468.35.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Any dog who is placed in our rescue who has not been vaccinated receives a vaccination.

How many pets did this grant help?

25

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Mickey (first photo), pictured with A Forever Home Animal Rescue president and owner Lori Mastrantoni, is a 7-year-old dachshund who is paralyzed in his back legs. He is one of many dogs who have received and are receiving the vaccines partially paid for by the $250 Petfinder Foundation grant. We are tremendously grateful for this help. With the exception of BrynLee (second photo) and Olaf (third photo), these dogs will require careful placement. We are hopeful that will happen soon. In the meantime, they are being well taken care of at the rescue.

Meet Mickey here.
Meet BynLee here.
Meet Olaf here.