Bar Dog Operation Grant

Cabin Critters Rescue: Bar Dog Operation Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

To purchase our first microchip starter kit. We have since ordered additional microchips.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It has allowed us to microchip all the dogs adopted from the rescue and also to offer microchips as a service to the community at a reasonable cost.

How many pets did this grant help?

100

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Forest came to us through a hoarding situation in which we received 19 Chihuahuas. He was very shy and scared, and after we spent some time working with him, he was finally ready for adoption. Forest was microchipped before he was adopted and now his new family doesn’t have to worry if Forest wanders off because he is microchipped, and once he is scanned, the microchip is registered to his new owners.

Valley Animal Haven: Bar Dog Operation Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

We used the grant funds to purchase vaccines for the animals at our facility. From May 4, 2021, through Aug. 13, 2021, we purchased a grand total of $3,529 in vaccines. The grant was used to offset the cost of these vaccines.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We provide vaccinations to all shelter animals prior to adoption. In the case of puppies and kittens, we provide them a series of vaccines, as outlined in our treatment protocols, through the date of adoption. These vaccines are of extreme importance in our life-saving efforts.

How many pets did this grant help?

272

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Victoria (first photo) was found running at large and immensely pregnant. She was very close to being ready to deliver her kittens when she came into our facility. She was immediately moved into one of our foster homes and delivered her kittens four days later.

It was determined that this was very likely Victoria’s first litter, as she is very young. She was a very dedicated mom while also remaining very loving to her foster family and their personal pets. Victoria LOVED to play and interact with the family dog whenever she wasn’t caring for her kittens.

Victoria and her kittens were returned to the shelter when the kittens were 12 weeks old. They were all spayed/neutered and the kittens were adopted right away. As usual, it took Victoria a little longer to meet her furever family, as most adopters prefer to adopt kittens rather than adult cats.

The grant funds from the Petfinder Foundation were instrumental in helping us prepare Victoria and her babies for adoption in that it provided the funds to purchase their life-saving vaccines.

We provide three different vaccines for our cats/kittens: The first is an HCPCH/FELV combination vaccine that protects the animals against feline upper-respiratory, calicivirus, feline herpes, and feline leukemia. The second vaccine, given three weeks after the first, provides additional protection against feline upper-respiratory, calicivirus, and feline herpes.

The third vaccine is a rabies vaccination that is administered by our veterinarian when the kittens are 4 months old. The leukemia component is only administered once a year and a subsequent vaccine is not needed within the kitten series.

These vaccines allow our team to provide the adopter with a tremendous sense of security in knowing that the animal they are adopting from our facility has been given vaccines to help prevent illness. We could not continue our life-saving mission without the help of amazing partners like the Petfinder Foundation.

We are the only facility in our area that houses cats and kittens and prepares them for adoption. We took in more than 325 cats/kittens between Feb. 1 and Aug. 10, 2021. All of these animals received life-saving vaccines while in our care. Of that number, 223 cats and kittens have been adopted as of the date of this report. We are including photos of some of the cats who had their litters while in our care. Each of these animals was helped by these grant funds.

Henry County Humane Society-Geneseo: Bar Dog Operation Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

We used the money we were awarded through this grant to fully vet 11 dogs that we pulled from an overcrowded shelter in another state. This allowed us to deworm every dog, provide monthly heartworm preventative and flea treatment, spay a momma dog, and give the first round of shots to seven puppies.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant allowed us to help pull a larger number of dogs from an overcrowded shelter in Oklahoma. This shelter’s intake has been over 600+ animals a month, with several litters of puppies being surrendered each week. The fate of a lot of these dogs would have been very grim if we were not able to transport them to our shelter to be adopted out. We were able to get these dogs healthy and into their forever homes.

How many pets did this grant help?

11

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Oaklynn (first photo) was a pregnant pit mix who was surrendered to the shelter in Oklahoma. She was a very special save for us as this was the first time we have ever taken in a pregnant dog. We were introduced to the shelter in Oklahoma where Oaklynn came from by another shelter in our area. We had been partnering with the shelter in Oklahoma for several months when they reached out to us asking if we would be interested in taking a pregnant dog.

We agreed to take her because if they hadn’t been able to find another shelter or rescue for her, she would have been euthanized. So we put out a plea on Facebook to find a foster who would be willing to take Oaklynn and help care for her and her puppies when they were born.

We didn’t have a lot confidence that we would be able to find someone. To our amazement, a single mom who had two kids still at home agreed to foster Oaklynn and her puppies. She said since she was working at home it was the perfect time to foster. She had never fostered before and didn’t have any experience with pregnant dogs.

Because we were very fortunate that a foster stepped up, Oaklynn made the 12+-hour ride up to our shelter in a van full of other dogs. Oaklynn arrived at our shelter on a Friday night at about 11:00 p.m., and we had an appointment scheduled the next day for her to see the vet so that we could get an idea about how many puppies she was expected to have.

Once she arrived at our shelter, she was picked up by her foster and taken home. To our surprise, Oaklynn was at the foster home getting settled in and it wasn’t even 30 minutes after she’d come off the transport that I got a text from Jodi, Oaklynn’s foster, saying Oaklynn had had her first puppy! This poor girl waited the whole ride up here until she was safe in a home to give birth.

Jodi did an amazing job and said Oaklynn was a great mom, which made it much easier on Jodi. In the end, Oaklynn gave birth to seven puppies who were all pretty different from each other.

We were so very thankful that we were able to find a foster so we could save the lives of these eight amazing dogs. Jodi did an amazing job. She made sure that the puppies received lots of attention and were well-socialized. She even did such an amazing job posting about her experience on Facebook that she had potential adopters reach out to us before the puppies were even ready to be adopted. Five of them ended up having homes lined up a couple of weeks before they were even ready to go home.

Jodi even had birth certificates made up and had baby pictures of each puppy printed for each adopter! I was her foster mentor, which means that at any time she could reach out to me with questions or for help, support, or whatever she needed. This is something we provide all of our fosters with.

Our shelter is working hard to grow and expand in different ways so that we can help as many animals as possible. It is because of pets like Oaklynn and her puppies that we know we want to strive to do more and that it really takes a whole lot of teamwork to make it possible.

The grant money made it possible for us to not hesitate to take on the expense of a momma dog with a litter of puppies. Each and every one of the puppies and the mom all found amazing homes:

  • Oaklynn was adopted by a friend of Jodi’s and is loving life with her new dad and his other dog.
  • Milo was adopted by Jodi. He has a four-legged brother along with Jodi’s kids (Milo is on the right in the second photo).
  • Lola (third photo) was adopted by a great family. She is actually the first dog they have owned and she gets to go to all the kids’ sports games.
  • Sunny (fourth photo) went to a lady that I used to work with. She and her husband had been looking for a puppy for several months but either were too late in applying or just couldn’t find what they wanted.
  • Gus was adopted by Jodi’s neighbors. He lives with another dog and two kids.
  • Remy was the runt and was adopted by the parents of a couple who are Jodi’s neighbors. They wanted to take him home immediately when they saw him and could hardly wait the two weeks until he was ready. He is living with a couple of feline friends, also.
  • Meek was adopted by the brother of Jodi’s boyfriend, so he gets to see his brother Milo all the time.
  • Tito was the only one who went to a family that no one knew previously. But he has two school-age kids to play with and his family adores him.

Against All Odds Cat Rescue: Bar Dog Operation Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

This grant allowed Against All Odds Cat Rescue to provide routine and special care for several cats and kittens. With these funds, the rescue was able to take in and find homes for cats who otherwise may not have been able to safely find homes without exhaustion of resources. Funds were used to spay and neuter, vaccinate, microchip, and combo-test cats and kittens and allowed for send-off testing as needed for at-risk or special-needs kitties. These funds also helped provide supplies such as dietary supplements and medications for cats in need.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant has supported vital routine, preventative, and special care for cats and kittens, which directly results in saved and fulfilled cat lives. Funds such as these allow our organization to directly support and sponsor more cats, ensuring their long-term safety and health. Our organization focuses particularly on helping to save at-risk or special-needs cats, which inherently increases our need for funds to provide tailored care. Because of grants such the Bar Dog Operation Grant, we are able to facilitate health and ensure safety for the most vulnerable cat populations.

How many pets did this grant help?

10

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

The impact of the Bar Dog Operation Grant is fully realized through the examples of the lives directly impacted. These funds provided direct care and support for one of our mom cats and her litter, and two special-needs kittens we were able to commit to with these funds.

Jory and her kittens were found locked in a garage when the kittens were estimated to be around 2-3 days old. At the point of rescue, momma was very hungry, which meant her kittens were too. With dedicated funds, we were able to readily take them all in and remain prepared with nutritional supplements as needed. While mom and babies took right off, there were certainly complications along the way.

One of her kittens, Penelope, had a complication with her spay surgery and required a second operation and special care in the weeks following. She and her sister Rosie both required nutritional supplementation and special medication related to difficulty maintaining a healthy weight. Their brother Marty had to undergo special testing to rule out feline leukemia as well since he had a positive test originally. Thankfully, the full blood tests for Marty showed he was negative for FeLV! ​

Later, mama Jory was found to be FIV-positive and our organization was able to remain prepared for any new or developing needs that may arise for her, as well as for her extended time in foster care while she was searching for an appropriate forever home.

Additionally, this grant also allowed us to take in some very special and fun kittens from a nearby shelter. Otis and Ophelia are two very sweet and cool kittens who have a condition called cerebellar hypoplasia. They are healthy and fun in every way, other than they walk a little funny and have a hard time staying balanced.

Due to their condition, the shelter knew it would be a lot harder to adopt them out and take care of their needs in the meantime — that’s when they reached out to us to see if we could help. Thankfully, we did have a foster available! Otis and Ophelia are still looking for their furever homes here.

Jory and her kittens have all been adopted to happy and loving homes, and we were able to commit to helping Otis and Ophelia and many other kittens with the generous support of the Bar Dog Operation Grant. Funds such as these have a tremendous impact for our organization!

McCracken County Humane Society: Bar Dog Operation Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Puppy and kitten milk replacer and Nutrical

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We have had a very busy kitten season and have had several litters of kittens and puppies that have come in malnourished. We have been able to supplement them all with kitten/puppy milk replacer to help them put on healthy weight to prepare for spay/neuter. Some of the puppies and kittens have had very heavy flea infestations and were severely anemic, and we have been able to supplement them with Nutrical to further boost their health, making them ready for adoption.

How many pets did this grant help?

140

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Button (first four photos) was a kitten who came to us weighing around 1 lb. He was severely anemic, missing fur, and covered in fleas. We immediately began supplementing his diet with Nutrical and giving him wet kitten food with kitten milk replacer mixed in.

He went into a foster home where he could be given frequent, small meals throughout the day and night. With continued supplementation, he has gained weight, his fur has grown back soft and healthy, and he is scheduled to have his neuter and be placed for adoption.

Staff came in to work one morning after it had stormed all night to find a tote containing nine wet, cold, dehydrated kittens (fifth photo), including Dewey (sixth photo). They had been left in the rain sometime overnight and a brick had been placed on top of the tote to keep them inside.

They were immediately rushed in, bathed, and fed. They were given Nutrical for several days as well as wet food with kitten milk replacer added to help nurse them back to health. After a few weeks of supplementation, they gained enough weight and became healthy enough to have their spays/neuters; most of them have been adopted!

Wagon Tails Farm Rescue: Bar Dog Operation Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Flea/tick and heartworm preventatives for foster animals

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This allows us to keep our fosters safe and happy while they are in our care! Nobody likes being covered I’m fleas or having heartworms, so we start them on preventatives as soon as they come to us! Having a grant to help cover even just a portion of this allows us to use that money on more important things, such as special veterinary care for fosters like October, a 7-week-old kitten who came in with two pelvic fractures and a diaphragmatic hernia. While in the end, she only survived a few weeks because the surgery was too much for her, we were able to give her every chance we could at surviving those wounds!

How many pets did this grant help?

50

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Flea/tick and heartworm prevention is such a vital, yet commonly overlooked, part of rescue. This grant has helped so many pets, but the one who stands out the most is Tito. Tito originally came to rescue with his mother and nine siblings at only 1-2 weeks old back in February. Tito struggled in the beginning; he was so badly infested with worms that, when the litter was dewormed, he almost didn’t survive because he had that many in him that needed to come out.

He finally started to come around from that when we realized his hair was falling out in patches, so he was quarantined for suspected ringworm or some other fungal issue. To better cover his needs, he was moved to a new foster home.

With monthly preventatives and lots of love and time and training, Tito is now a strong, handsome, loveable pup looking for his furever home! Coming up on his five-month birthday, he would make the perfect addition to any home!

Humane Society of Morgan County: Bar Dog Operation Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The funds helped us replace artificial turf in our exercise lots. The total cost was $16,000, but the $750 really helped us. Because there were several funding sources for the project, adding the Petfinder Foundation’s Bar Dog grant to the list gave added prestige to our requests and demonstrated that multiple contributions of similar amounts would help us reach our goal.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Replacement of the turf was critical because several rips had turned into deep holes, and muddy dogs were the result. We needed artificial turf to help make it easier for our rescues to learn housetraining as a result of their experience in the shelter. More importantly, artificial turf makes it much easier to disinfect the area and keep disease under control.

How many pets did this grant help?

All the dogs that pass through our center: on average, 20 dogs at a time, as they are rotated through each yard.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Jett and Raleigh are examples of the dogs who enjoy the area. Jett has been adopted, and Raleigh is in foster care to have experience in a family home. She is getting chicken training, dog training, and practice avoiding cars. Many of our foster dogs are adopted by their foster parents. Several families have expressed an interest in Raleigh. She is on Petfinder; you can meet Raleigh here.

Humane Society of Tampa Bay: Bar Dog Operation Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The grant was used to purchase 200 microchips for shelter animals.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped us to provide microchips to 200 pets for putting them up for adoption. In Florida especially, we see an increase in the number of pets escaping in the summer months. This is because they will get frightened by the thunderstorms and/or fireworks. Microchips are essential to helping reunite pets with their loving owners.

How many pets did this grant help?

200

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

This grant helped Beau, a 2-year-old beagle mix who was found wandering the streets by a good Samaritan. He was brought into our shelter, where we provided appropriate medical care and vaccinations, as well as a microchip. Beau has been adopted, but should he ever escape his new family’s home, he can be quickly reunited because of his microchip thanks to the Petfinder Foundation.

Ridgefield Operation for Animal Rescue (ROAR): Bar Dog Operation Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The Petfinder Foundation grant has been used to purchase special food for our senior dog, Jericho, for his food allergies; his joint supplement medication for arthritis; and training sessions while he is at the shelter and in his foster home as we try find him his forever home.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

In addition to the special food, Jericho has also undergone two x-ray procedures to monitor his digestive system. Proper equipment has been purchased, including a lead harness, crate, the durable toys we are observing him with, a slow-feeder for meals, and a month or more of the special food.

The total cost of these necessities for Jericho, including annualization of the cost of his special food, exceeded the grant amount. We are securing additional funding with our appeals and social media fundraising plans.

How many pets did this grant help?

one

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Jericho is a pittie/Staffordshire terrier/bulldog. During his nine months at ROAR, he celebrated his eighth birthday. Nine months in the shelter is a long time given that the average stay for our pets is approximately one month. Jericho is a big boy with a number of medical issues, the costs of which the Petfinder Foundation grant is intended to offset.

He is deaf, has vision issues, has had multiple grade-2 mast cell tumors removed, has had multiple teeth pulled, and he will most likely need more teeth pulled in the future. While he has had skin issues potentially due to food allergies, a change in food and a strict diet has helped to get this under control. He interacts well with dogs in a doggy daycare setting.

Jerico’s background is unknown, so his quirks are interesting to figure out. He loves to be pet and kissed but doesn’t know how to cuddle, which is typical of many shelter pets. He is extremely food-motivated, which is very helpful for training purposes. He will do anything for a treat and is a fast learner.

Jerico has been living in foster care, which is fully financed by ROAR, and outside of the shelter environment has shown himself to be a perfect gentleman. He is house-trained, has never tried to run away or out a door, and has never chewed anything, including our foster mom’s much-loved Ugg boots. He sleeps on his own bed and can snore with the best of them.

There is nothing not to love about this wonderful pet and companion. ROAR is dedicated to supporting him in the right home.

Jericho has yet to be adopted. Meet Jericho here.

Boone Area Humane Society: Bar Dog Operation Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The $500 grant was used to purchase microchips and rabies vaccines.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Having the costs of microchips and rabies vaccines paid for freed up money in our budget to pay for some medical costs for dogs transferred in from overcrowded shelters.

How many pets did this grant help?

39

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Hank was transferred into our shelter from a small shelter in Iowa. They were having trouble getting him adopted because they could not afford the eye surgery Hank needed.

With the Petfinder Foundation grant covering microchips and rabies vaccinations for 39 dogs, we were able to free up funds so Hank could get his needed eye surgery. Hank was adopted to a wonderful family and is living his best life now!