Bar Dog Operation Grant

Indiana County Humane Society: Bar Dog Operation Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Indiana County Humane Society used the money from the Bar Dog Grant for vet trips, medications, and special dog food.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped us provide our dogs with the special foods they need for their diets. We have many dogs in our facility who need to be on specific food just for them, and this grant helped us pay for that. We also had a couple dogs who needed to go to the vet and get medications for issues they were having, such as medications and steroids for skin issues. This grant helped our dogs so much and we are so grateful to have gotten approved.

How many pets did this grant help?

It helped all our dogs, but it really helped two of them the most.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Jed (first four photos) came to ICHS as an owner surrender in June. When Jed arrived, he was severely overweight and in great pain from being overweight. He weighed around 140 lbs. He could barley walk; he would walk for a few minutes and then need to sit or lie down to catch his breath.

Jed has had to make several trips to the vet for his weight. They put him on a special food and a weight-loss plan. ICHS noticed one day that Jed was acting unlike himself, so we rushed him to the animal hospital, where we found out that Jed had a bunch of rocks in his stomach.

The vet gave Jed something to see if he would pass the rocks on his own before deciding whether he needed to have surgery. Thankfully, the medication worked and Jed passed the stones on his own. After Jed recovered from the stones, we got him back on his weight-loss plan and he is down 30 lbs.!

Jed now weighs around 110 lbs. and is running and playing in the pool every chance he can get. Jed is still with us for the time being.

Fronz (bottom two photos) came to ICHS as a stray. Fronz was a mess: He had a horrible skin condition and an infection in one eye. Fronz was also so scared when he came to us, he did not want anyone to touch him or come near him.

It took ICHS some time to get Fronz comfortable with us. We took him to the vet and he needed drops for his eye infection and an antibiotic. They also put him on medication for his skin along with a steroid.

Fronz was incredibly thankful when he finally started feeling better. Once he was finished with his medications and all healed up, he became available for adoption and got adopted in a week! Fronz’s new owner has contacted us to keep us updated on his progress and she has said that Fronz is a completely different dog and is such a happy guy.

2 Hands Saving 4 Paws Humane Society: Bar Dog Operation Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Medications, vaccines

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We were able to receive compounded ponazuril, metroniazole, and vaccines to keep the rescues healthy and rid of coccidia. With a recent coccidiosis outbreak in a litter of puppies, we were able to obtain a prescription that helped treat those pups and the pups they were in a play yard with. All the pups were treated and had been given ponazuril compounded medication, which is a fast-acting medicine that kills the coccidia. Treatment was three days rather than the typical 10-day regimen. Two trays of vaccines were also purchased to vaccinate 50 pups in rescue. We thank you for helping us help the voiceless animals.

How many pets did this grant help?

50

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

This is the remarkable story of Fallon the Fighter. She just found her forever home, and she will have a wonderful life. Her eight siblings were not as fortunate, but I’m sure they will all be watching over her as she experiences her new healthy, happy life.

On July 1, 2021, 2 Hands Saving 4 Paws Humane Society, Inc., received a plea for help from a resident within in our community. They had a litter of puppies that needed to be surrendered due to a family member being unable to care for them.

Upon viewing the initial photo we received (first photo), and the deplorable condition the pups were living in, we immediately took the puppies into rescue.

When we received the puppies, they were extremely dehydrated and infested with fleas. Their tiny bodies were bloated with worms; they had skin issues and weeping sores all over their bodies; they were lethargic, lacking a proper food source; and several had neurological issues, as evidenced by their tremors and shaking.

We immediately bathed, wormed, and settled them into our indoor quarantine area (second photo).

Over the next several days, we rushed them one by one to our veterinarian (third photo) for declining health and an overburden of intestinal parasites like nothing we’d ever seen.

The director of the organization watched them around the clock, giving them supportive care, subcutaneous fluids, vitamins, glucose, probiotics, and wet food by hand to help them gain strength. The puppies were diagnosed with several different parasites, coccidiosis, giardia, and skin infections. One by one, they started to pass away, leaving just one survivor, whom we named Fallon the Fighter.

Like her siblings, Fallon had enormous abscesses develop all over her body as a result of living in a crowded crate and sleeping in her own feces and urine. Some of the abscesses needed to be drained several times a day and have warm compresses applied to help keep them from hardening.

Unfortunately, the initial treatment for the coccidiosis and runny stool was not working.

The grant we received gave us the funds to purchase a stronger, compounded medication that immediately helped kill the coccidiosis that was ravaging Fallon’s body. We ordered and received our ponazuril overnight, along with a compounded metronidazole prescribed by our veterinarian. After the first couple of doses, we noticed an immediate change (fourth photo). Fallon was eating more, and no longer having watery, greenish stools.

Fallon the Fighter was living up to her name: She started to bloom and grow (fifth photo). She no longer weighed just a few ounces. She become playful and found her bark rather than only crying and whining. Vaccines were given every two weeks and in late August 2021, she was healthy enough to be spayed.

Just this past week, Fallon the Fighter was cleared for adoption, and we transported her to New Jersey (sixth photo), where we host adoption events monthly. This past Saturday, Sept. 18, 2021, she found a wonderful forever home (last photo). We told her new dad her story and the fight she fought to thrive and survive the horrific start to her life.

We know her eight siblings will be watching over her from beyond the Rainbow Bridge and cheering her on as she gets to experience a full, healthy, happy life.

We are thrilled with this “happy tail” ending for one very special little fighter who was determined to live on.

Humane Society of Dover-Stewart County: Bar Dog Operation Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The grant was used for medical care and treatment for a total of seven abandoned dogs.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

One of the seven dogs helped by this grant had been shot by an unknown person (first photo). The grant helped offset some of the costs of her surgery and medical treatment.

Another had been abandoned near a local river ferry (second photo). The grant paid for his medical evaluation and shots/vaccinations.

The remaining five dogs cared for were a set of puppies abandoned on a rural county road (third photo). The grant paid for their initial puppy shot series.

All these puppies and dogs are currently being fostered and will be adopted to new families when their vaccinations and spays/neuters are completed.

How many pets did this grant help?

Seven

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Baby Girl is a friendly dog who was abandoned in a rural area in the county. She was shot in the mouth by an unknown person. The gunshot fractured her mandible/jaw bone and she required two complicated surgeries to repair the extensive internal injuries. She was rescued, treated, and is being fostered by a Humane Society of Dover-Stewart County volunteer while she is healing. She is expected to make a full recovery after her next surgery on her jaw. Although the vet bill is expected to exceed $800, the Bar Dog Grant helped defray at least a bit of the cost. Baby Girl is a super-sweet dog and will be adopted when she recovers from her wounds.

The Grateful Dog Animal Rescue: Bar Dog Operation Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The $500 grant will be used to provide 2.5 months worth of Khan’s (very expensive) medication, Atopica, when he is adopted. The $500 is set aside in our account to purchase this medication for his adoptive family when the time comes. We have not purchased the medication yet, as it doesn’t have a long shelf life and we don’t want it to expire. We don’t know how long it will be until he finds his forever home.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant will help Khan significantly. Khan’s medication costs us $200 per month, and this is not including a very expensive diet, which is averaging $500 per month. Being able to purchase two months worth of Khan’s medication will, we hope, increase his chances of finding a forever home, as his medical condition is not the easiest to deal with, and we want to make sure he is set up for success!

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Khan has not been adopted yet, as he still has a very long way to go until he is cleared, medically. Khan suffers from severe environmental allergies, as well as allergies to all meat-based proteins.

He was surrendered to us skin and bones and without any fur on his body. While his fur has started to grow back, we are struggling with trying to get him to a healthy weight, despite the amount of food he is eating. We have upped his caloric intake and are trying to get him to a healthy weight and let the rest of his fur fill in.

He has only been in rescue with us since June. We anticipate him being in rescue with us at least for the next six months. He has some ways to go for his recovery, and is not posted on Petfinder yet as a result.

FIV Felines, Transports and More: Bar Dog Operation Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Cat food

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant helped us to buy quality food for the cats in our shelter.

How many pets did this grant help?

20

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Oscar was trapped in a local community and was neutered. He was found to have FIV, an abscess, and severe infections in both ears. The vet determined that he had food allergies and had to be put on a prescription diet. The prescription food was very expensive and would have put a huge dent in our food budget. Thankfully, the grant has enabled us to buy his food so far. Oscar is still with us. You can meet Oscar here.

Centre County PAWS: Bar Dog Operation Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

We used the funds received from this grant to purchase microchips for our shelter dogs.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

PAWS spends approximately $8,000 annually on microchips for the animals in our care. Your grant of $750 allowed us to offset our annual expenditure by this amount.

How many pets did this grant help?

68 dogs

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We had two dogs surrendered to us a few months ago from a humane case – Francine (first photo) and Beans (second photo). Francine was emaciated but was gaining weight and we quickly found out she was pregnant. She gave birth to five beautiful puppies shortly after arriving at PAWS (third photo). Francine, Beans, and all of the “Beanie babies,” as we called the puppies, were micrcochipped thanks to your generosity.

ROC the Dogs Rescue, Inc.: Bar Dog Operation Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

We used the granted money to purchase new cat enrichment toys from Chewy and Amazon.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It allowed us to supply and offer our cats a variety of enriching toys and play towers.

How many pets did this grant help?

Six to seven so far, but these toys will be offered to any and all cats who come into our rescue.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Pistachio is a small black-and-white kitten who was trapped with many other kittens. She is a very spunky, playful kitten who likes to explore her surroundings. These new enrichments allow her to explore and further develop the skills needed to live a safe and healthy life. She is currently not adopted.

Animal Shelter Alliance of Rhea: Bar Dog Operation Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Each healthy dog or puppy costs approximately $200 for basic medical care, including spay/neuter, basic vaccines, de-worming, flea/tick/heartworm prevention, food, etc. Our normal adoption fee is $135, so we used the Bar Dog Operation grant to offset the medical costs towards the adoption fees of dogs during the month of July.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

In the summer months our facility, like many others, is near capacity at all times. By lowering our adoption fees to $65, we were able to place more than 30 dogs and puppies in homes during the month of July. Many more were transported to other no-kill facilities in larger areas where the animals have more opportunity for adoption. Every dog who is adopted or transported makes room for the next dog to receive love and care at our facility.

How many pets did this grant help?

We’re going to say 64: the 32 dogs who were adopted in July, and the 32 more whom we are able to help this month because we have more room! We know that the $1,000 grant specifically offset costs for 7.4 dogs, and we also know that having that cushion allows us to advertise the lower fee, and THAT gets lots of dogs placed locally!

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

All of the pets in the last two photos were adopted in the month of July! The shepherd-mix puppies (from top: Violet, Sky, Oscar, Max, and Colby) were such a mess when they came in – full of fleas and ticks and, of course, worms. They all got their first baths, then their medical assessments and treatments for all the nasty creatures living in and on them, as well as some time to decompress and get back to a normal weight. Then the adoptions started! That kept us busy for a couple of days, but they are all so sweet and adorable, it didn’t take too long for their adoptions to be completed! We are so excited to have them in their homes and so thankful to the Petfinder Foundation for helping us to help them!

Cabin Critters Rescue: Bar Dog Operation Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

To purchase our first microchip starter kit. We have since ordered additional microchips.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It has allowed us to microchip all the dogs adopted from the rescue and also to offer microchips as a service to the community at a reasonable cost.

How many pets did this grant help?

100

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Forest came to us through a hoarding situation in which we received 19 Chihuahuas. He was very shy and scared, and after we spent some time working with him, he was finally ready for adoption. Forest was microchipped before he was adopted and now his new family doesn’t have to worry if Forest wanders off because he is microchipped, and once he is scanned, the microchip is registered to his new owners.

Valley Animal Haven: Bar Dog Operation Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

We used the grant funds to purchase vaccines for the animals at our facility. From May 4, 2021, through Aug. 13, 2021, we purchased a grand total of $3,529 in vaccines. The grant was used to offset the cost of these vaccines.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We provide vaccinations to all shelter animals prior to adoption. In the case of puppies and kittens, we provide them a series of vaccines, as outlined in our treatment protocols, through the date of adoption. These vaccines are of extreme importance in our life-saving efforts.

How many pets did this grant help?

272

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Victoria (first photo) was found running at large and immensely pregnant. She was very close to being ready to deliver her kittens when she came into our facility. She was immediately moved into one of our foster homes and delivered her kittens four days later.

It was determined that this was very likely Victoria’s first litter, as she is very young. She was a very dedicated mom while also remaining very loving to her foster family and their personal pets. Victoria LOVED to play and interact with the family dog whenever she wasn’t caring for her kittens.

Victoria and her kittens were returned to the shelter when the kittens were 12 weeks old. They were all spayed/neutered and the kittens were adopted right away. As usual, it took Victoria a little longer to meet her furever family, as most adopters prefer to adopt kittens rather than adult cats.

The grant funds from the Petfinder Foundation were instrumental in helping us prepare Victoria and her babies for adoption in that it provided the funds to purchase their life-saving vaccines.

We provide three different vaccines for our cats/kittens: The first is an HCPCH/FELV combination vaccine that protects the animals against feline upper-respiratory, calicivirus, feline herpes, and feline leukemia. The second vaccine, given three weeks after the first, provides additional protection against feline upper-respiratory, calicivirus, and feline herpes.

The third vaccine is a rabies vaccination that is administered by our veterinarian when the kittens are 4 months old. The leukemia component is only administered once a year and a subsequent vaccine is not needed within the kitten series.

These vaccines allow our team to provide the adopter with a tremendous sense of security in knowing that the animal they are adopting from our facility has been given vaccines to help prevent illness. We could not continue our life-saving mission without the help of amazing partners like the Petfinder Foundation.

We are the only facility in our area that houses cats and kittens and prepares them for adoption. We took in more than 325 cats/kittens between Feb. 1 and Aug. 10, 2021. All of these animals received life-saving vaccines while in our care. Of that number, 223 cats and kittens have been adopted as of the date of this report. We are including photos of some of the cats who had their litters while in our care. Each of these animals was helped by these grant funds.