Petfinder Adoption Options in Action Grant (Invitation Only)

Breckinridge County Animal Shelter: Petfinder Adoption Options in Action Grant (Invitation Only) Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Dog/puppy play yard project

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The play yard project has really given our dogs a safe, comfortable and enriching place to play. We noticed that the dogs are showing their true colors once in the play yard. Playgroups have also become a daily enrichment since the play yard project was completed. Our volunteers are thrilled to have a place to interact with the dogs. The public/community has really embraced our play yard as well. They have donated new toys, treats and a kiddie pool just for the play yard. They love our updates on social media and want to give back to our dogs in need. The dogs in our care are truly benefiting in many ways, all thanks to the play yard.

How many pets did this grant help?

100, and more to come!

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Burt and Ernie were two German shepherd brothers who came into the shelter as owner-surrenders. Their owner was diagnosed with an illness and could not care for them any longer. We knew adopting out two bonded adult brothers would not be easy. After posting a picture of the brothers in the play yard, we had a wonderful family come by the shelter to meet them. We walked the family into the play yard to introduce everyone. They soon fell in love with Burt and Ernie! Burt was showing off all his tricks and spunky characteristics on the puppy play ramps. Ernie was giving kisses to their youngest granddaughter. The family got to see Burt and Ernie’s real personalities in the play yard, which made them adopt. Everyone got a happy ending!

Miss Maggie May's Rescue: Petfinder Adoption Options in Action Grant (Invitation Only) Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

We used the money to offset the cost of much-needed training for dogs who have been in rescue for a while and one who was very scared of human interaction. Our goal was to help eight dogs. Four of the dogs did not make it to training: Two got adopted and are doing great in their homes, one passed away from kidney failure, and the other one has been responding well to the training his foster is providing.

The stories of the other four are below.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It helped reset a few of the dogs so that we can start getting them to adoption events, building up their confidence and helping our fosters to better understand them and continue helping these dogs to be all they can be.

How many pets did this grant help?

4

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Sabrina (first and second photos) was born in rescue over three years ago. She was adopted at 4 months of age and came back to us a month later due to a family emergency. She was adopted out again a few weeks later, and again returned to us due to a changed work schedule. Sabrina was going to adoptions at our local Petsmart twice a month. In the last year, she started to get a little reactive towards other dogs, and not too happy when people would approach, so she started to stay home. We had her evaluated and it was found that she was attached to her foster family and was being protective. Our trainer started working with her by taking her out and about and letting her know the world is still okay. Sabrina will be attending an adoption event this month, but another foster will be handling her. The second pic is a goofy photo of Sabrina not wanting to get out of the trainer’s car when she was brought back home, the first is Sabrina at a cafe. Meet Sabrina here.

Zelda (third photo) came to us very pregnant, and very scared. She couldn’t walk, she was so pregnant. Her foster was only able to handle her and pick her up because she couldn’t run away. Zelda gave birth four days after she arrived. Her foster continued to try to handle her, but as the pups grew, Zelda kept finding places to hide. You could see that she wanted human interaction but was scared of it — she wouldn’t even eat in front of people. Zelda’s foster was eventually able to pet her and give her ear scratches, but very slowly. Zelda started to turn around a little bit after a year in rescue, but only with her foster mom. She was okay with the large resident dog, but not the other dogs or the other adults in the home.

We had to get her over that final bump in her road, so we had her evaluated and it was determined that she would benefit from a board-and-train situation in our trainer’s home. She has made great progress and soon will be returning to her foster home. She still needs a little more work, but our trainer will give her foster the tips and guidance to continue working with Zelda and building up her confidence.

Two other dogs also went into board-and-train situations. Beau needed a little bit more manner training than we could provide and went into a day camp/boarding situation. He is now attending adoption events. The fourth photo shows him from our Adopt Love Adopt Local event here in Tucson. Meet Beau here.

Fifi has been in rescue for more than two years and started getting too protective of her foster mom with other dogs while out in public. She will be attending adoption events again starting this month. Meet Fifi here.

Stephens County Humane Society: Petfinder Adoption Options in Action Grant (Invitation Only) Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Stephens County Humane Society purchased new Petco folding crates with our grant money. Many of our existing crates were bent, starting to show signs of rust, had broken or missing bottoms and were rapidly becoming unusable. We were definitely in need of new crates, and were delighted when our grant request was approved.

Because of a company-wide sale going on at Petco at the time of purchase, we were able to order two more crates than originally planned, for a total of seven medium, seven large and five extra-large Petco premium, two-door crates!

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The crates we were able to purchase with this grant have helped in so many ways! First and foremost, we have been able to supply new crates to our families taking dogs home as part of our foster-to-adopt (sleepover) program. The crates are returned to us at the time of adoption or when the dog is returned because the family decided not to adopt. Previously, all we had to offer were old crates with missing or broken trays, bent doors, etc. Offering new crates provides better security for the dog, looks much better and is representative of the image Stephens County Humane Society wants to portray.

A second way in which we have been helped has been in our foster program. As of this writing, we have four crates out with puppies in temporary foster programs. It is much safer for young, vulnerable puppies to be in foster homes until after their second booster shot and for us to be able to send a large crate so the puppies have plenty of room to play, sleep and begin puppy-pad training is key to the success of our puppy foster program.

A third use for these crates has been at on-site adoptions. These crates are so lovely, it gives our on-site adoptions the professional appearance we are seeking to assure our potential adopters that we are a legitimate animal-welfare rescue and shelter. And having the additional crates means our on-sites can include more dogs and/or we can have more than one on-site scheduled at a time.

Lastly, we use one of the new crates in our office for dogs who need a little extra TLC. We had a young pup who came to us with a fractured rear leg. He was our office companion for several weeks, kenneled in one of our new Petco crates. In another situation, we had an adult male who developed a severe infection following neuter surgery. He also spent several days in the office, where we could keep him calm and give him the care he needed while he healed. (This boy – Rigsby – is in one of the included pictures.) Yet one more example is Bettie Jo. This young pup (included in the pictures submitted with this report) was adopted and returned after the family realized they could not give her the care she needed. She came back severely malnourished, with a dull, brittle coat. Bettie Jo was kenneled in the office, where we could give her personal care, monitor her food intake, keep her warm and get her back on the road to health. These are just a few examples of this valuable purpose for our new crates. (See the story below about Jack for yet another example.)

How many pets did this grant help?

Because we used the grant for crates that have multiple and repeated uses, determining a specific number of pets helped is difficult. A conservative estimate of animals helped is 50-75 from the date we received the grant up to the date of this report. And, of course, as outlined above, the crates continue to help us in a myriad of ways.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We recently had a little Jack Russell terrier at the shelter named Jack. He came to us as an owner-surrender, covered in fleas and in questionable mental health. It was obvious that Jack had been treated with a heavy hand because of his tendency to cower and be just a little hand-shy.

For three mornings in a row, while housed in our kennels, he was nervous and snappy and very difficult for staff and volunteers to deal with. So we set him up in the office, in one of our new Petco crates, with a blanket and a pet bed and let him live in the office, closing the crate at night.

What a difference! Throughout the day, he would routinely “put himself to bed” in the crate and take a nap, and we could see his confidence rising, knowing he had his own safe “den” to run to. He became more open and trusting and the snappiness completely disappeared.

Jack was adopted into a great, dog-experienced home the day after his neuter surgery. As a result of his time as our office dog, we were able to share a lot of information about him that will, hopefully, ensure his success with his new family. And we emphasized the need for Jack to have a crate where he could feel secure and have a safe place of his own to go.

Stanly County Animal Control: Petfinder Adoption Options in Action Grant (Invitation Only) Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

To purchase 100 microchips from the Michelson Found Animals Foundation, Inc.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

These will give the adopted animals a greater chance of being returned to their owners if they go missing.

How many pets did this grant help?

100 total

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Jaeger came to the shelter on Nov. 30, 2018, and was with us for two months. On Jan. 28, 2019, he was adopted to a loving family. Thanks to the Adoptions Options in Action grant, we were able to provide him with a free microchip that was registered to his new adopted family as well as to our shelter.

Friends with Four Paws: Petfinder Adoption Options in Action Grant (Invitation Only) Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The funds allowed us to purchase a high-quality camera with multiple lenses and equipment for a portable photography studio with lights and a backdrop.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helps our organization put our adoptable pets out on our Petfinder website in the best possible way and give them the extra little bit to look their best.

How many pets did this grant help?

So far, this grant has helped at least 80 dogs find their home!

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

This grant has specifically helped a little guy by the name of Dan to quickly find his home! With our new equipment, we were able to get good-quality photos of him and upload them to Petfinder, and within just a few hours the application came in that would put Dan and his new family together.

Living the Dream Rescue: Petfinder Adoption Options in Action Grant (Invitation Only) Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

We used the Adoption Options in Action grant to purchase volunteer-support tools. We were able to purchase a laptop computer to use in our clinic to expedite updating and maintaining the accuracy of our medical records. We were also able to purchase a microchip scanner to keep at each adoption venue location. We bought TILE trackers to put on the scanners as well so they would not disappear.

Laptop computer – $434.39
Two Halo microchip scanners – $163.50
TILE trackers for microchip scanners – $125.54
Total: $723.43

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped us to be able to verify the accuracy of our records and adoptions. We were also able to verify ownership and reunite animals more quickly when they are turned in at adoption locations. We also used the scanners to help the public outside of our organization by providing additional options to have animals scanned.

How many pets did this grant help?

57

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

While picking up a cat who had wondered into a hotel lobby and needed rescue, we learned of additional kitties on the premises who were being taken care of by employees. We were able to scan all three. Two of them, Zackery and Binx, were chipped to the same owner, who was actually a guest at the hotel. We contacted the guest and were told they could not keep the cats but did not know what to do with them. They had moved all the way from North Carolina to Phoenix recently. An employee of the hotel, Jason, was very fond of the cats and took them home since he knew they needed a home now! The third kitty who did not have a chip is safe with our rescue and awaiting adoption.

Save The Cats Arizona: Petfinder Adoption Options in Action Grant (Invitation Only) Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

To start a formal behavioral program.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant is helping us help the cats in our care. There are some cats who need a little socialization to get them ready for their forever homes and there are some of our cats who are not accustomed to human touch. Both scenarios are very important to us. One will get the kitty into a home and the other will allow us to give medications and be able to groom the cats.

How many pets did this grant help?

It was a benefit to all 50 of our cats in general. Fourteen of the cats need human introduction and 10 need less-intense interaction.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Terry, our sanctuary manager, has been working with three cats to get them more comfortable with interactions with people. She is working with the more mild kitties first and working on her skills to tackle the spicier ones later. She’s pictured here with our cats Poe (first photo) and Jetta (second and third photos).

Eden Animal Haven: Petfinder Adoption Options in Action Grant (Invitation Only) Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The money was used to purchase feline leukemia vaccinations.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We are a cage-free cat shelter, meaning that our cats are housed in community rooms after their intake quarantine period. Even though all of our cats are tested for feline leukemia upon intake, there is always a chance for a false negative due to the cat having recently gotten infected. At this year’s Adoption Options conference, the presentation made by the veterinarian emphasized the importance of vaccinating for FeLV in shelters where the cats are in community housing. In the past three months, we have vaccinated all incoming cats with two boosters and those due for re-vaccinations. We have enough funds left over to hopefully continue these vaccinations until the end of the year.

How many pets did this grant help?

38

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

On Oct. 19, 2018, Chex, her three siblings, and their mother were pulled by Eden Animal Haven from a city pound when the kittens were only about 8 weeks old. They all tested negative for feline leukemia and, with help from the Petfinder Foundation Adoption Options in Action grant, we were able give them all a series of two feline leukemia vaccination boosters. This helped ensure that they would be protected from contracting feline leukemia while in our community housing rooms. Three of the kittens have since found loving families. Chex and her mother, Gretchen, are still patiently waiting for their forever homes.
Chex’s Petfinder profile can be found here.
Gretchen’s profile is here.

Bridge to Home Animal Rescue: Petfinder Adoption Options in Action Grant (Invitation Only) Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

Bridge to Home Animal Rescue utilized the grant money by purchasing six crates, two puppy scales, and two heat lamp units for dogs and puppies. We were graciously granted $911.94 and the total of our purchases was $926.34.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Bridge to Home Animal Rescue was enormously helped by being able to purchase quality equipment to distribute to our new foster families. In addition, as of Dec. 23, 2018, we have welcomed three litters with a total of 17 newborn pups! The puppy scales and heat lamps cannot come too soon for our brand-new additions. The cages are perfect for large dogs and litters of puppies: The animals are elevated so their paws are not constantly making contact with feces or urine while in transport or at home.

How many pets did this grant help?

This grant helped numerous dogs, and will continue to in the future. As of the beginning of January 2019, we have rescued 70 dogs, which does not include the newborns!

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

The story I am going to share with you is about the first dogs who were able to benefit from the crates we purchased with the grant money. They were originally known as the “Y” puppies (first photo), and were finally named Yara, Yanna, Yogi, Yoshi, Yankee, Yahoo,and Yuengling. These puppies had a terrible beginning to their little lives: Unwanted and unloved, they were in a box that was dumped in someone‚Äôs front yard. Animal Control picked them up and took them to the shelter at Taylor County Humane Society in Grafton, W.V., where Bridge to Home Animal Rescue rescued them when they were approximately 6 weeks old. Happily, all seven puppies were adopted at the end of December 2018 to their forever homes.

Life On Paws Rescue: Petfinder Adoption Options in Action Grant (Invitation Only) Grant Report

What was the money or product used for?

The grant money was used to install a fenced-in play yard for the rescue dogs to play and interact.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The dogs at the rescue can now use the play yard to socialize and play with one another while they await their forever homes. The time in the play yard helps them to learn from each other to read social cues and learn acceptable play habits.

How many pets did this grant help?

There are currently six dogs who are using the play yard.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Twitty is a female mixed breed who came to the rescue completely afraid of people and other dogs. She would cower if any person or dog approached her. She also appeared to have no experience on a leash. Since the play yard was installed, Twitty has spent time there with two other dogs from the rescue and, while she isn’t playing with them yet, she isn’t running away, and has relaxed when they approach her. Twitty has not been adopted yet but this is a huge step forward for her. Meet Twitty here.